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Feb
5
comment Which personal pronouns and sentence ending particles would an old man use?
@TsuyoshiIto, are you sure about that? My image of だい and かい is more that it's a way for (possibly elderly) adults to speak to children to "soften" the tone. "坊や、もっと遊びたいのかい?" "うん、遊びたいっ!"
Feb
5
comment Which personal pronouns and sentence ending particles would an old man use?
@ssb, Wikipedia (ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%BD%B9%E5%89%B2%E8%AA%9E) mentions that it is similar to Hiroshima-ben, but might have different roots. I've also seen a theory that it comes from the way 長州藩 guys spoke in the Meiji/Taisho eras when they had a lot of power. In either case, the stylized version usually doesn't have other Hiroshima-ben traits, like けん or けえ instead of (conjunctive) から.
Feb
4
comment Parsing a specific sentence from a book
As for "horizontal line", good point. 換える is ichi-dan. It's 言い換えて.
Feb
4
comment Question on expressing a half-completed action — 動作が中途である状態
@TsuyoshiIto, the example has context, so it's unambiguous, you're right. But 書いていない in isolation is ambiguous between "is not writing" and "has not written".
Feb
4
comment Question on expressing a half-completed action — 動作が中途である状態
@TsuyoshiIto I agree that using ている as perfective aspect for action verbs is very common and correct in speech. And it might well be in (formal) writing as well, so maybe I shouldn't have added the last paragraph. There is definitely something fishy going on with the combination of tense-aspect and negative, too. The negative of 書いた is generally 書かなかった, but the negative of もう書いた is not まだ書かなかった, but rather まだ書いていない (or まだ書き終えていない).
Feb
4
comment Parsing a specific sentence from a book
The subject is unspecified. Another way to say it in English is "(The side line is) my remaining life visualized". Visualized by whom? I dunno... the computer, if I'm guessing correctly about the context.
Feb
4
answered Question on expressing a half-completed action — 動作が中途である状態
Feb
4
answered Which personal pronouns and sentence ending particles would an old man use?
Feb
4
answered Parsing a specific sentence from a book
Jan
31
comment Pronunciation of しゃ, し, しゅ, しぇ, and しょ
Wikipedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwanese_Mandarin#Taiwanese-influenced says that retroflex sounds aren't used much in Taiwanese Mandarin. I do not know if OP is Taiwanese, but even if he isn't, this could be one reason that the retroflex-ness is considered allophonic.
Jan
31
comment Pronunciation of しゃ, し, しゅ, しぇ, and しょ
Do some Mandarin speakers pronounce Pinyin "sh" in a non-retroflex way? I think I've heard that from some native speakers, and your question sorta suggests that as well. A bit off topic, but I'm curious.
Jan
20
comment What is the origin of the word 無{な}し?
Some other 終止形 commonly heard or seen in modern Japanese are あり and よし. And many nouns are really old 終止形s, like 仲良し, 証{あかし}, 寿司{すし} etc.
Jan
20
comment Does the nominalizer 〜の require the adnominal form before it? If yes, why?
@Sindry, little children? Where do you get that idea from?
Jan
19
awarded  Yearling
Jan
16
answered A は/が difference
Jan
16
comment A は/が difference
"neutral description only works with action verbs, existential verbs, and adjectives/nominal adjectives that represent state change". Are you sure this is from Kuno's "The Structure of the Japanese Language"? I've seen lots of grammatical examples in the book which don't follow this, like "空が青い" or something to that extent. I don't have the book with me right now, but I can give specific page numbers later.
Jan
8
answered Usage of noun-modifying である
Jan
8
comment Different meaning of 何?
@yadokari, Hyperworm's "What else must I lose for my heart to be forgiven" seems like the best translation to me, since it's an accurate translation and natural English. Of course, this is poetry, so as long as you're willing to relax the accuracy constraint, "best" can be highly subjective.
Jan
7
comment Different meaning of 何?
@yadokari, I fully agree with Hyperworm's analysis. Japanese allows question words in dependent clauses, but in English the rules for wh-extraction from dependent clauses are more complicated. You might be able to get away with "What will my heart be forgiven if I lose (on top of what I already lost)", but it sounds rather awkward, and it's not easy to see where the "what" was extracted from.
Dec
23
comment What does “クズな” mean?
@Dono, I don't find 犬なだけ ungrammatical at all. Google has lots of hits for it. And I did already try another noun, 男. See my comment above.