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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Aug
24
answered Kanji for native Japanese concepts: Kun'yomi spanning multiple morphemes
Aug
23
comment Use of unit abbreviations in Japanese
30℃=摂氏30度. People would rarely say that in Japan, though, since Celcius is the default.
Aug
22
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
@jkerian, I'm not confusing the two, I'm saying that 送る is an action verb, i.e. the ている form expresses the progressive, not the perfective. But I'm losing confidence. Looking online and inquiring with other speakers, it seems some people would even use 食べている to mean "have eaten". This is not a natural use for me, but maybe I'm biased wrt. dialect and/or age group. Maybe I should ask another question about this from a diachronical/regional standpoint.
Aug
22
revised When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
deleted 92 characters in body
Aug
22
answered What is the つく used at the end of this sentence
Aug
22
answered When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
Aug
22
comment When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state?
戸を閉めている does not mean "The door is closed." It can only mean "Sby is closing the door."
Aug
22
comment What is the difference between “〜がる” and “〜がっている”
Nope, @Flaw. 怖がる is not a change-of-state verb, but a progressive-action verb (not sure about the nomenclature). Therefore 怖がっている is present progressive (showing signs of..) whereas 怖がる is either future or habitual.
Aug
22
comment What is the difference between “〜がる” and “〜がっている”
Disagree with 1. Verbs ending in がる are non-stative, so the plain がる form expresses habituality or future tense. I don't think either fits the situation you describe. It should be がっている.
Aug
20
comment 得意とするところ explanation?
"得意にする" sounds very unnatural to me, unless maybe you mean something like "become good at".
Aug
20
answered Where does the word キレる come from?
Aug
18
comment List of Japanese counter words
@MarkHosang who decides what is correct or not if not the people using the language?
Aug
18
comment List of Japanese counter words
"+ 船 (sen) for ships". Really? Don't see this in the page you link to. Sure you don't mean 隻 or 艘?
Aug
18
revised Why do children call themselves by their name?
added 17 characters in body
Aug
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
14
comment What exactly is “なの” (nano)?
You are correct that (な)の in the affirmative is feminine speech, but you might want to mention that in questions, it is neutral (at least in standard (Kanto?) Japanese, western speakers might feel differently).
Aug
14
comment What exactly is “なの” (nano)?
Ah, and also 大変よ and 大変ね are used, mainly in feminine speech. Yeah, I realize it's confusing.
Aug
14
comment What exactly is “なの” (nano)?
仕事は大変の? is ungrammatical. You might be confusing things, since you mention 高いのよ without saying that this is mainly feminine speech.
Aug
12
revised Imperative used instead of conditional form
deleted 2 characters in body
Aug
12
comment Imperative used instead of conditional form
@ZhenLin, basing this only on my gut feeling, I would think it's a similar parallel phenomenon going on in both spheres, rather than a translation... there definitely seems to be something going on with conditionals <-> subjunctives <-> imperatives. Maybe a good question for linguistics.stackexchange.com