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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


Mar
31
answered Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
Mar
31
comment Is 行かされた a typo?
Did you try Google? Search for '"行かされた" conjugation' and the first couple of hits will tell you this is a causative passive.
Mar
27
comment Likely Sentences (Nuance in use of 〜てもらう vs Passive form)
@YangMuye, what is passitive?
Mar
27
comment is ~だ~だ another way of listing things, or does my JLPT book have a typo?
Does "I thought you lived in Japan?" serve any purpose, except for making fun of OP?
Mar
27
comment ー vs small kana vs long kana for writing long vowels
OK, for おねえさん, this is the "correct" spelling and おねーさん or おねぇさん would be "alternative". For "correct" spelling, ー is not used with hiragana, and small kana are not used to indicate long vowels. All this is ignoring the question of とう versus とお and えい versus ええ.
Mar
27
comment ー vs small kana vs long kana for writing long vowels
Whether it's すげー, すげぇ or すげえ, to me is like asking whether LOL is upper or lower case. It's not standard to begin with, so it's up to personal taste. Whether it's すげー or すっげー, of course, depends on how you pronounce it.
Mar
27
comment Is it true that the meaning of あ可よろし is unknown?
detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1017711765
Mar
26
answered What exactly does the grammatical form NがNなだけに mean?
Mar
25
comment What exactly does the grammatical form NがNなだけに mean?
Yeah, that explanation is useless. It means something like "At a time like this", or "Given the circumstances", hinting that the extreme/unusual time/circumstances call for extreme/unusual measures.
Mar
25
comment は and が in this sentence
Both は and が are acceptable here, but by using は, I feel there's a slight change of focus from the alloy itself to its applications. Some more context might be useful. Does the text go on to describe these applications in more detail?
Mar
25
comment When is 死に used to describe something is dead instead of 死んでいる or 死んだ?
"死んだ人 isn't entirely unheard of" gives a false impression. 死ぬ with people is very commonly used. It's just that euphemisms are often used when addressing someone directly affected by the death or when showing respect to the deceased. Similar to English "die" vs "pass away".
Mar
21
comment Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
Right, and neither is が. I think it makes more sense to say that either が or を can mark objects of stative verbs than to say that 食べたい can either mean "want to eat" or "is the object of desire to eat" or some such.
Mar
21
answered Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
Mar
21
comment Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
In listings like that, you can't really expect full sentences. In this case, it's explaining the meaning of a noun with a noun phrase.
Mar
21
comment Use of が vs を with transitive verb, 受け入れる(+もらえる)
"his feelings take が and are therefore the subject". Do textbooks really teach that? How do they explain りんごが食べたい? 食べたい means "to be the object of desire to eat" or something?
Mar
21
comment あなたがこの文のおかしいと思うところは?
Interesting question, but I think you could improve it by explaining what you find strange about the sentences. How do you attempt to parse them? Do you interpret the の as possessive-の or relative-clause-が-turned-の? Is the reason you want to move あなたが that that would allow you to parse the の as a possessive の?
Mar
20
comment causative passive potential form
To elaborate: cross-linguistically, "potential" is often used to describe a mood indicating that something "is likely", but for Japanese, it's mostly used for える・れる, which describes CAPABILITY.
Mar
20
comment causative passive potential form
I'm confused. "It is possible" is not usually expressed by える・れる in modern Japanese. By "potential", do you mean this specific auxiliary verb, or are you talking about a broader category?
Mar
20
comment causative passive potential form
“It is possible that she may make you eat her cooking”. Where's the passive here?
Mar
20
comment Modifying adjectives: カンペキ [に or な?] 思ったとおりの仕上がり
@Kaji, it's being used as an adverb to modify the verb, な (copula rentaikei).