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I speak Japanese semi-natively, but have never studied Japanese grammar formally (only the stuff I've picked up here and there). I'm very interested in grammar in general, but do not know much of the terminology specific to Japanese. Looking forward to learn (and teach)!


3h
comment What is the は doing in this sentence?
Hm, I first parsed 子供の私には as top-level, but the more I look at it, the more I think your parse is better, and at the very least permissible. I retract my comment.
5h
comment What is the は doing in this sentence?
"the は appears in a subordinate clause". I think that calls for an explanation. I disagree.
1d
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
10
answered トライしてみて. Usage?
Apr
9
comment Why should I use つかれました and not つかれたです
"there's no motivation", motivation or not, people still use it. There are looooads of hits on Google for "疲れたです" by native speakers. "there's no reason for people to start treating it as an acceptable part", what, people using it isn't a good reason? It's not standard, you're right about that, but what you're saying about reasons and motivation doesn't make much sense.
Apr
9
comment Appropriate context for お前【まえ】
It could be a place to use a pronoun, given the right context, like 俺はここに座ってるから、お前はビールをもってこい. I personally think your change makes the sentence a lot more natural, although maybe not very PC. It's pretty uncommon for a husband to address his wife as あなた.
Apr
8
comment Usage of passive form
「思い知らされ、だから」seems a bit strange to me. Is that really the wording? Or does the sentence not stop at しまうのだ?
Apr
8
comment This usage of 方 confuses me
Can you provide more context? What is it that people can or can't do in their imagination? Why does the person say that it's more peaceful not to be able to do this?
Apr
8
comment Questions about `〜はる` 敬語
@itrasci, according to ja.wiktionary.org/wiki/…, it's regional whether it attaches to 未然形 or 連用形. But apparently 来る is always きはる, and 通る is always 通らはる, so the grammar seems a bit more complicated than that.
Apr
7
comment What are the origins of the 「こそあど」 demonstratives?
This doesn't really answer the question, which is about origins.
Apr
7
comment What is the origin of ポイ as in “タバコのポイ”?
It really said that? タバコのポイ without 捨て? ポイ as a noun by itself strikes me as quite slangy and not likely to appear on a sign, although possible in colloquial speech: ポイはいけないよ!
Apr
7
comment Why are points used where furigana would be normally?
@SimonGill, I'm fairly certain that I've seen cases of both ルビ and 傍点 on top of each other... but can't seem to find any cases online.
Apr
4
comment Usage of すみません (sumimasen) versus ごめんなさい (gomen'nasai)
すみません's informal alternative is すまない. I'd consider すまん dialectal/non-standard.
Apr
2
awarded  Pundit
Apr
2
comment Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
@hippietrail, just in case you hadn't noticed, 泡盛 (at least etymologically) follows the same pattern, 泡 means foam, 盛る means something along the lines of "heap up". So 泡盛 would be something like "heap of foam" (referring to something in the brewing process, Wikipedia tells me). I guess in this case there's no logical reason why it's not 盛り泡 "heaped up foam" instead.
Apr
2
comment Meaning of ~かといえばそうではない
What part do you not understand? How did you attempt to understand it?
Apr
2
comment How do you pronounce みずうみ? (lake)
@YangMuye, no, I'd expect that to be いるう↓み. I suspect みずうみ might be special in the way that many speakers do not perceive a morpheme-break (and therefore do not downstep after う), while prescription says that there is one.
Apr
1
comment Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
@hippietrail, sorry, late reply. As you've seen from the other question, 割り works as a noun, modified by コーヒー. But I think it makes some sense to call it a suffix as you do, since it's a bound morpheme (at least with this meaning), i.e. *割りを飲む doesn't work.
Apr
1
revised Why is coffee with shochu or awamori called コーヒー割{わ}り “split / divided coffee”?
missing -ese
Apr
1
comment が vs を in sentences of desire (-たい)
I think this answer overstates the contrast. Maybe you're right that "It's a MOVIE that I want to see" is more common with が, and "I wanna SEE the movie" is more common with を, but for the neutral "I wanna see a movie", your distinction doesn't really make sense.