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Apr
21
answered Is this sentence structured correctly?
Mar
25
comment Using a person's name in place of a pronoun
"Using a person's name in place of a pronoun". Think of it the other way round, pronouns are words that you use instead of nouns (including proper nouns). In English, the substitution is mandatory in certain situations (e.g. first and second persons), in Japanese it's not.
Mar
19
comment What does "ああ こいつ ひろわれっ子なんで かーちゃんいないんだ”
"ひろわれっ子 is a sound change of ひろわれた子", I doubt that, do you have any sources? I think it's a variation of ひろわれ子, just like もらいっ子 is a variation of もらい子.
Feb
24
comment Japanese for baby kangaroo
@broccoliforest, 子フクロウ does give quite a few Google hits, but so does 子カンガルー, so you're absolutely right that it's not as clear cut as I might have led to believe. Anyway, I was mostly trying to clarify your "always"-comment which I thought could be misleading.
Feb
21
comment Using demonstratives with time periods
Google gives many examples of "一年間半", many seemingly by native speakers, although I agree that "一年半" sounds better.
Feb
21
comment Japanese for baby kangaroo
@broccoliforest, I don't agree. That formula works best with native Japanese animal names. I can't think of any katakana animal names that it works well with, including 子カンガルー (which would be understood, but sounds unnatural).
Feb
13
awarded  word-choice
Jan
31
comment What does the phrase 「あんのかないのんか」 mean?
OK, thanks for checking. Unless the character speaks some rare non-stereotypical dialect, I think it's likely to be a typo by the author. By I'm also confused by your statement that the character speaks Kansai, since あんのか doesn't seem very Kansai to me, rather Eastern/Standard. Kansai would be more like あるんかないんか.
Jan
29
comment How is 口 used here?
Here's one jisho.org/search/%E5%8F%A3, entry 10
Jan
27
comment What does the phrase 「あんのかないのんか」 mean?
ないのんか, is that a typo?
Jan
19
awarded  Yearling
Jan
15
comment Is 何か an adverb?
@choco, yep, I agree. 一言 is usually used adverbially too.
Jan
7
comment What conjugation of 願う is 願わくば, and what does it mean here?
Very interesting! I was reminded of あわよくば, but in this case ば feels like a conditional marker, like in よければ, so I'm not sure if the etymology is related.
Dec
24
comment Why does も move in sentences involving だれも etc
Great question! This kind of も seems to want to travel up the syntax tree (which in Japanese usually means to the right), but I don't know the exact rules. だれにも頼まれなかった is correct. You could even say だれに頼まれもしないのに, but I feel it sounds a bit odd without the trailing のに, so there seem to be some subtleties.
Dec
24
comment だったら as an interjection
"ら is a rough indicator". I think you might be misunderstanding this one. ら means "if" here.
Dec
24
comment にとって as topic/subject marker and は as object marker?
としてはand にとっては are just topicalized versions of として and にとって.
Dec
24
comment Is there such a thing as a て particle?
@broccoliforest, not disagreeing, but how do you think べし is different from べきだ (except for the loftiness)?
Dec
24
comment にとって as topic/subject marker and は as object marker?
Just in case you didn't know, objects and adverbial phrases, not only subjects, can be marked as topics with は. So it's a subtle question of why the object is the topic here. Also, I feel the にとって adds the feeling of "as a newspaper company...", which a plain は wouldn't express
Dec
24
comment にとって as topic/subject marker and は as object marker?
Any chance you can provide 2 or 3 of the preceding sentences? They are likely to be relevant to the use of topic markers.
Dec
16
comment ~か ~かどうか 相対テンスの質問
Possibly what bothers Kentaro Tomono is that 完成する is often used as an intransitive verb, i.e. 任務が完成する or 任務を完成させる. But consulting dictionaries (e.g. dictionary.goo.ne.jp/jn/48651/meaning/m0u/%E5%AE%8C%E6%88%90), it seems that the transitive use also exists, so different speakers might give different grammaticality assessments here. If his concerns is simply that the subject is missing, then I cannot agree with him. Dropping subjects is completely common in Japanese.