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location Tokyo, Japan
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visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jul 16 at 19:15

Feb
10
comment What is the meaning of あるある?
@DaveMG I looked at those questions. I think what qualifies as a question here is just a bit too strict. Really seems like you guys are narrowing down your potential audience. This exchange of comments alone and seeing this question-poster berated has made me decide to stop coming here. If your response to that is, "well go away then," then you clearly don't have the site overall in mind. It just seems like a power trip to see who can follow the rules the closest, rather than actually encouraging an exchange of knowledge. I'm gonna go away now. Have fun with your FAQs and strict rules.
Feb
9
comment What is the meaning of あるある?
@DaveMG This seems like a completely valid question to me...Just being in a dictionary doesn't always mean it's clear to everyone. And seeing how this site is in beta and falls way below the numerical goals of StackExchange as listed in Area51, I think it might be in the best interest of the site to try and make everyone feel welcome to ask questions, and not berate them...But what do I know, I'm just the new guy.
Feb
7
comment What is じゃ in じゃない?
Can anyone clarify the level of difference in politeness/nuances between じゃありません and ではありいません?
Jan
23
comment How do I convey “As you all know”?
"知っている通りに" in quotes gets about 6 million hits on Google, plenty of examples of usage out there. But for a conference, yeah, definitely not, stick with the keigo.
Jan
23
comment How do I convey “As you all know”?
I'm not sure. Maybe it would be more fitting on the above answer as a comment since it's closely related? Still, it's a valid point, "知っている通りに" is fine and used.
Jan
23
comment attending court clerk in Japanese
In that case I'll write it as an answer.
Jan
23
comment attending court clerk in Japanese
Err, do you mean to ask, "how do you say attending court clerk in Japanese?" or, do you mean, "I found some Japanese that translates to 'attending court clerk', what does that mean in English?" If you're looking for "court clerk", it's 裁判所書記官. The use of "attending" is going to vary depending on the situation/context. Is he/she attending a party? A meeting? A court hearing? An execution?
Jan
23
comment How can I improve my Japanese vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills?
That's what I do, and I love it. But I know a lot of people find that becoming a flash card drone drains them out really fast because it can seem so systematic and lifeless. Only way to find out if it works for you is to try :)
Jan
23
comment How can I improve my Japanese vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills?
Ahah, looks like this was closed as I was writing my answer :) Oh well. Good luck to you, OP.
Jan
21
comment Is こんばんは too formal for everyday conversation?
"biiru (wo) go-hon kudasai" is correct. This is something I just learned and accepted without asking why, so as for the nitty gritty grammatical details as to why, I'm curious as well. I asked a native just now what she thinks of "go-hon no biiru wo kudasai", and she said it's slightly weird, but definitely understandable. To my surprise, she said that in that case you'd wanna go with "itsutsu no biiru wo kudasai" instead of go-hon. When I asked why, she just said, "it's just better," lol, but even then, she said it sounds like you're asking for a beer called "itsutsu," instead of for five
Jan
20
comment Difference between 「~のない~」 and 「~がない~」?
Strange, I just did it again, "顔がない男" gives me "About 43,700,000 results (0.10 seconds)" and "顔のない男" gives me "About 114,000 results (0.12 seconds)", both searches in quotes.  Top result I get for が is a photograph: [顔がない男] (matome.naver.jp/odai/2126630425930832201/2126637041231295603) Is the title of that photograph as 顔がない男 incorrect? How is it different than this book:  [顔のない男] (amazon.co.jp/…)
Jan
20
comment Difference between 「~のない~」 and 「~がない~」?
I'm a bit confused on the "logical scope" part to be honest, keeping in mind the movie title example (顔のないスパイ). Particularly because the example is so short (there are only two nouns and no numbers). I tried another similar example via Google Search. In quotes, in Google, 顔がない男 = 22 million results. 顔のない男 = 114,000 results. の, while far less used, seems to get more legitimate results (i.e. a book on Amazon titled 顔のない男). But the が version has plenty of people using it in forums and blogs. So both are clearly legal in terms of grammar, but something must be different.
Jan
20
comment Difference between 「~のない~」 and 「~がない~」?
Thank you for your answer. I'd still specifically like to know the difference in the case of ない. For example, the movie title I found: 「顔のないスパイ」 ("Spy without a face"). What would the difference be, if any, between that, and 「顔がないスパイ」? If the movie were titled that, instead of 顔のないスパイ, on a scale of "flat out wrong" to "perfectly correct", where would it fall? How, in concrete detail, would it change the meaning?
Jan
19
comment Any books or websites dedicated to Japanese tech/IT language?
Thanks a lot, this is very helpful.