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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Oct 30 at 11:14

Sep
4
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
1
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
9
revised Is 君 (きみ) obsolete as a way to call your romantic partner?
partner is ambiguous, the question really means romantic partner
Jan
9
comment Can Chinese and Japanese calligraphy of the same character be identified as such?
Yes, my intention was about consistent stylistic differences, particularly in brush calligraphy where they seem to be more pronounced.
Jan
9
asked Can Chinese and Japanese calligraphy of the same character be identified as such?
Jan
9
suggested approved edit on Is 君 (きみ) obsolete as a way to call your romantic partner?
Aug
27
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
29
accepted How did コンセント come to be used for “outlet”?
Jan
20
awarded  Yearling
Jan
20
asked How did コンセント come to be used for “outlet”?
Dec
6
accepted Was there a single word/concept もの which was later split into two (now distinct) kanji 者 and 物?
Dec
6
awarded  Editor
Dec
6
revised Was there a single word/concept もの which was later split into two (now distinct) kanji 者 and 物?
edited title
Dec
6
comment Was there a single word/concept もの which was later split into two (now distinct) kanji 者 and 物?
@user1205935 Thanks for the clarification. No particular reason, just that I came across it and was wondering. Also it offers a tantalizing look at a transition between a more "primitive" consciousness of all things being fundamentally the same to a division between things and people that could be linked to the introduction of a Chinese linguistic taxonomy.
Dec
6
comment Was there a single word/concept もの which was later split into two (now distinct) kanji 者 and 物?
@user1205935: that's a great question and list (to the extent that I can follow it...) but I think my question is different : in contemporary usage the kanji have clearly different meanings but their parallel usage and homophonic kunyomi hint that the Chinese characters may have created that difference rather than reflecting two different pre-existing concepts.
Dec
5
comment Was there a single word/concept もの which was later split into two (now distinct) kanji 者 and 物?
Concrete evidence could include early writings that "confuse" the kanji, using them in ways that indicate that the distinction between person and thing is new/unnatural. Perhaps one character was initially used for person and thing and only later the other character was introduced. I am not an expert (otherwise I would not have asked) but I would imagine there have been studies done on cases such as this. Regarding the name of the question I couldn't think of anything more fitting that would fit on a single line. Feel free to edit if you can think of a better title.
Dec
5
asked Was there a single word/concept もの which was later split into two (now distinct) kanji 者 and 物?
Jan
20
comment What does さようなら (左様なら) have to do with “left”?
Do you mean that 上 and 右 are never used as ateji?
Jan
20
revised What does さようなら (左様なら) have to do with “left”?
Changed tags to reflect the substance of the question (now that I know the answer)
Jan
19
comment What does さようなら (左様なら) have to do with “left”?
@sawa, I don't understand. I realize that 左 (as 左記), 右記 and I guess also 上 have the meaning of "the preceding" or "the following" based on the old writing order. But if it's ateji, what difference does it make?