801 reputation
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location Seattle, WA
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Mar 11 '12 at 21:53

I'm a software engineer at a Japanese company, and I've been studying Japanese for a little over 10 years. I passed the JLPT Level 1 back in 2005, when the test still consisted of only 4 levels. I love the Japanese language and helping others to appreciate it!


Jan
24
comment Lunar Seas and Sun Hills at a sports park?
Not quite sure, but it seems to me very akin to naming the two places "Moon Beach" and "Sun Hill." I don't think there's any particular logic to it, but I'll add this as a comment since I'm not sure.
Jan
24
comment Words made from strokes of a kanji like 女 toくノ一
The 字 doesn't have to do with sleeping; 「川の字」 is literally translated as "the character for river." The 字 is specifically pointing out that the people are in the shape of the character itself. I think you're overthinking it :)
Jan
22
comment what does it mean when a causative verb is conjugated in the causative form?
かぶせる means "to put on" or "to cover with," so かぶせさせる means "to make (someone) cover" or "to have (someone) cover." The causative here is pretty standard; in the first example, it means "to make them put (the foil on the leaves)." In the second example, it is, as Ito-san said in another comment, more similar to かぶせる in meaning than かぶさせる. But grammatically, it's just causative, not "causative of causative."
Jan
22
comment what does it mean when a causative verb is conjugated in the causative form?
The verb is most definitely not かぶる; it is かぶせる. かぶせる is not a causative form; it's a normal, transitive verb. That verb is then conjugated into causative form, becoming かぶせさせる. Here's a link to the dictionary entry for かぶせる: dic.yahoo.co.jp/…
Jan
21
comment Is こんばんは too formal for everyday conversation?
I like to think of the "gohon" as acting grammatically like an adverb here. It makes the sentence placement and grammar seem more intuitive.
Jan
20
comment Why is it 日本語がわかります instead of 日本語をわかります?
This sort of explanation is what I came in here to post, but you beat me to it :) This is how I explain 「~が分かる」 to people--it's like concepts dividing themselves in your mind into categories. The etymology of the word gives us a very cool way of thinking about understanding in general!
Jan
19
comment How do you say “[amount of time] later”?
I agree, but any particular reason you added this as a comment and not an answer?
Jan
18
comment Difference between ゆくすえ, しょうらい and みらい
You're totally right! Thanks; I fixed the post.
Jan
16
comment の versus が used to mark the subject of an appositive clause?
「彼女が態度を尊敬しています」 would not be correct (modern) Japanese, since there's no verb for が to use--が is the marker for the grammatical subject of a verb, but there is no such verb here. If you want to leave out the verb clause 「どんな困難からも逃げない」 entirely, then you must use の:「彼女の態度を尊敬しています」.
Jan
16
comment の versus が used to mark the subject of an appositive clause?
Not exactly. Replacing の with が would break up the clauses differently, something like this: (彼女がどんな困難からも逃げない)(態度). But that sounds a bit strange--perhaps you could say it's similar to saying "I respect the attitude of her never running away from any hardships" (which sounds strange) versus "I respect her attitude of never running away from any hardships" (which sounds normal). Since the emphasis is on her attitude, it seems like 「彼女の態度」 should be the base clause from which everything else is built up within this sentence.
Jan
16
comment What is the difference between these words for “audience”?
In general, 観衆 is a more common word that 聴衆. Since you're also viewing most of the things you listen to, if it's a concert, for example, both 観衆 and 聴衆 are acceptable. Just Google "コンサートの_____" to see what I mean. 聴衆 doesn't work for events that you don't listen to, however--Google "試合の_____" to see how different the number of hits are between 聴衆 and 観衆. In general, the difference between 観衆 and 観客 is only one of collective versus individual. Hopefully that clears it up for you.
Jan
16
comment What is the difference between these words for “audience”?
Please read more carefully: in my opinion, these definitions are pretty distinct. To elaborate: as I said, a lot of it hinges on the medium. 聴衆 is for an audio performance, whereas 観客 and 観衆 (with singular and collective meanings, respectively) are for performances that you watch more than listen to. And 視聴者 is a passive listener or watcher of a streamed medium from far away. The situations in which you would use each of these words overlap at points, but are largely different ones.
Jan
15
comment When to use 種別 and when to use 区分 when programming
Ahh, お得意さん hadn't occurred to me. Thanks!
Jan
14
comment How do you conjugate i- and na- adjectives (into the presumptive, imperative, conditional, provisional, and progressive forms)?
Zhen Lin: Good point with 〜かれ. Of course, this is very uncommon. I think I've seen it even less than 〜かろう; I think the only time I every saw this was in classical Japanese class in college. Myeong: Hmmm. Yes, I've seen constructions like that before but they're exceeding uncommon.