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seen Mar 22 '12 at 15:08

Feb
9
comment What is とは、のが、のは、には、 へは and では?
Because it's unrelated to the question.
Feb
5
comment Term for health retreat accommodation
クルザール? Not sure if this fits the bill.
Feb
1
comment Expressing neighborhood in Japanese
How about どこらへん?
Feb
1
comment Where does the ド in ド素人 comes from?
どん百姓 is another one.
Feb
1
comment How can I differentiate between “risk” and “danger” in Japanese?
Dave M G, to avoid katakana because it's not Japanese is a very Western way of thinking. If you want to really feel Japanese, one way is to use katakana words the way Japanese use them, not as they are used in English. For example, if you say 仕事のパワー, you are using パワー in a very Japanese way to mean 'ability'. This is katakana, but it's definitely not English. So, it's not the use of katakana that should be a problem, it's how you use it!
Jan
31
comment Is 眠たい an adjective?
Nice, Chocolate, I didn't think of 重たい. But I can't think of any others.
Jan
24
comment Is 眠たい an adjective?
There is a somewhat similar case with 煙たい. (Conjugations can be described as 'irregular'. I'm not sure if it's useful to talk of derivations as 'irregular'.
Jan
23
comment When to use ご返事 and お返事?
Actually, 返事 is not a word of Chinese origin. It is a 'pseudo-word of Chinese origin'. It's not found in Chinese and is probably the Chinese reading of a Japanese word.
Jan
20
comment Why is the Hepburn system of romanization generally used over the Nihon-shiki system?
Thanks! I forgot ヴ!
Jan
18
comment How to speak in Kansai dialect
Of course there are patterns. If I remember rightly, it involves a shift to the right (or left) by one mora -- this was discovered by a Japanese linguist. In an intellectual sense that is fine, but it isn't going to help you very much in actually memorising the accent of words.
Jan
18
comment What does it mean to be “over a law”?
'In terms of' sounds better than 'from the viewpoint of'.
Jan
18
comment How to speak in Kansai dialect
The 全国アクセント辞典 by Hirayama Teruo (平山輝男) gives accent for Kyoto dialect. It even gives the accent for various verb forms. However, I would say you've got your work cut out for you if you want to be able to switch effortlessly between Kansai and Standard. It's not just a matter of putting on a funny Kansai-style accent. The accent on each individual word has to be just right, or you'll sound like you're totally mangling it. The other problem is learning two accents for every word. If you could do that for the entire vocabulary of Japanese, I'd certainly be impressed, because I know I can't.
Jan
17
comment Can もの be used to imply the value of something that is a こと?
Atlantiza, I hope you appreciate that your question has been answered. There is a difference between もの and こと, as explained. If you want to think of the difference as being due to もの referring to 'physical things', that is possible, although I'm doubtful that that is a good explanation.
Jan
17
comment What does this Japanese text say?
I don't know Pokemon, so I can only guess. But ねかしつける means 'to put to bed, put to sleep'. Because there is an を here, it means there is an unmentioned subject, but it would probably mean 'you' in the context.
Jan
15
comment Changing a question into a request for advice
どこへ行っていいです is fine in conversation. It means 'where is it permissible to go'.
Jan
15
comment Changing a question into a request for advice
どこへ行っていいですか? means 'Where is it ok to go?', which isn't the requested meaning. Using 良い makes it sound very formal.
Jan
9
comment Can もの be used to imply the value of something that is a こと?
I wouldn't say that you can't say them. But my feeling is that 君がくれたこと doesn't sound as right as 君がくれたもの. At any rate, I did a Google search of 君がくれたこと = 19 results. A similar search of 君がくれたもの = Page after page of results, although many related to the lyrics of one particular song. As for 君が教えてくれたもの, I didn't rule this out. As it turns out, a Google search yielded a lot more occurrences of 君が教えてくれたもの than 君が教えてくれたこと. I will have to think more about this question, and hope someone who has a better understanding / theoretical framework can answer it better.
Jan
8
comment Strange use of であった in narrative
It depends what you mean by "setting the scene". I think こうして here refers to what went before, i.e., the way that Bucky saved the four people, which could be some kind of description or actual events as observed. The meaning would thus be: "Here we had Bucky, who in this way had rescued four people". こうして could be omitted from the sentence and the relative clause would have the same narrative force.