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seen Apr 11 '13 at 19:56

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awarded  Nice Question
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Mar
7
awarded  Commentator
Mar
7
comment How to read the Modulo operator in a formula
Thank you for your answer, like I said on Ryo's answer I wish I could accept all of these, but I'll go with oldergod's answer simply because they also provided another way to read the formula which I am seeing a lot now that I know what I am looking for. Thank you for your time.
Mar
7
accepted How to read the Modulo operator in a formula
Mar
7
comment How to read the Modulo operator in a formula
Thank you for your answer, I wish I could accept all of these answers but I am going with oldergod's answer because now that I know what I am looking for I'm seeing aをbで割った余り more than aをbで割るところの余り.
Mar
7
comment How to express the concept of negation in mathematics
@ssb Thank you for letting me know, I'll have to take a look at them.
Mar
7
comment How to express the concept of negation in mathematics
Thank you for linking me to this definition. Just for everyone else's information, I found that the word for the - operator in Japanese when used as -$a is 単項マイナス演算子 (Unary Minus Operator).
Mar
7
accepted How to express the concept of negation in mathematics
Mar
7
asked How to express the concept of negation in mathematics
Mar
7
revised How to read the Modulo operator in a formula
edited tags
Mar
7
revised How to read the Modulo operator in a formula
Removed question about negation into a separate new question
Mar
7
comment How to read the Modulo operator in a formula
Of course, I'll move the Negation related part into another question now.
Mar
7
asked How to read the Modulo operator in a formula
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18
awarded  Nice Question
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15
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
11
comment Particles in the Passive form causing me confusion (を、に、が)
@user1087 Perhaps it is worth adding that the reason the を version sounds like "My" wine has been drunk by someone, is because it is in this case what seems to be commonly called the "suffering passive" (I don't know if that is the proper term for it; I'm not a linguist...), because it can describe how the receiver of the action could suffer in some way, meaning there must be some receiver of the action, as opposed to the に version (I think). For example you could say 財布を盗まれた instead of 財布が盗まれた. Perhaps someone else can explain better but I thought I would give it a shot.
Feb
4
awarded  Supporter
Feb
4
comment 揺れる with に or で
Thank you both for your answers! I wish I could accept two answers at the same time, but this has helped me a lot - Thank you.