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16

中点 ・ is used to express listing. In English, it would be expressed with a comma and the word and. A・B・C   (Japanese) A, B, and C  (English) Japanese has a counterpart to the comma, that is 読点 、, but its use is different from a comma. Some people use 読点 for listing things like this: A、B、C but it is not standard. In horizontal writing, some ...


6

As @dainichi has suggested in his comment I think you could use ちょっと。おススメのお酒/日本酒ちょうだい。or ちょっと。おススメのお酒/日本酒持ってきて。or ちょっと。おススメのお酒/日本酒もらうわ。 etc. in a Japanese restaurant. If in [居酒屋]{いざかや} you would say [熱燗]{あつかん}つけて。 一本つけて。 [沢の鶴]{さわのつる}、[冷]{ひや}で。 etc., depending on what (type/brand) you want / how (hot/iced/warm/room temperature) you want ...


6

When writing on a grid, they go in the upper right hand corner of the square below. Similarly, full-stops and commas (。、) also go in the upper right hand corner. At school, all Japanese first learn on such a grid. In normal handwriting, the distances become closer than on the grid, of course. (Also, 振り仮名 and Japanese "italicizing" (indicated by dots) go ...


5

Names of Japanese people have a specific spelling that may be in hiragana, katakana, kanji, or any mix thereof. You should spell their name as it is spelled, e.g. 「田中けい子」 (TANAKA Keiko). Names of foreigners are written in katakana, unless they have decided on the equivalent kanji they want to use. Or if they ask you to choose the kanji then do so paying ...


5

In Japanese calligraphy and penmanship, usually kana are written slightly smaller than kanji. Basically, the more strokes a character has, the larger it should be written for proper balance and appearance. This is because simple characters look larger than complicated ones with human eyes. This article says, "漢字:10、ひらがな:8、カナ・ローマ字・数字:7~6、特殊記号:6". Addition: ...


5

Usually, they should be the same size, but considering the history that okurigana used to be markings (like subscripts) on the Chinese text to add Japanese inflections, it is natural that they are written smaller than kanji. In fact, in caligraphy, it is usually said that hiragana should be written smaller than kanji.


3

Now, in between the words 開発 and 販売 there happens to be a nakaguro. In this context what does it mean? Is it simply a short hand listing for する verbs? (similar to an & sign?) or perhaps it is used to build some special type of compound verbs? According to the Japanese Wikipedia article on 「・」, this mark is mainly used as a divider in compound words. ...


3

There are different methods to use in different contexts. For form samples, they tend to use the institution name in place of a family name and stereotypical names such as 太郎, 花子 for the given name. 三井 太郎 河合 花子 ○○大 太郎 In real estate contractions, traditional variable names are used. Cf. 甲は乙に対して、... In mathematical contexts, it is natural to ...


2

I haven't seen a lot of those cases in daily life. I feel like people use English in sentences when they want to add some "fanciness" (for some reason people seem to think it's cool to use English). Like you said in the comments, the only places I can think of where English words are used in Japanese sentences are titles in magazines and TV ads. Although ...


1

A non-Japanese name that ends in a consonant is transcribed using the -u kanas, and in some cases the -o or the -i. The Japanese language, being moraic, lacks any syllable coda, as you mentioned above. The -u and -i sounds are implicitly silent when they come at the end of a word. So some examples would be: Erik: エリク Mike: マイク Chris: クリス Ash: アッシュ Robert: ...


1

You should keep in mind writing non-japanese names with kanji COULD be seen as somewhat not in very good taste. While it's there's no universal rule about it, since some people might see it as ranging from childish to culturally-insensitive, I'd keep using exclusively katakana for foreign names. Straying a little from your question, it's generally a nice ...


1

In this particular case ギャル文字 is referring to the uber-feminine use of the language. Some of those characters like the ッ are like our emoticons ;-) and some are legitimate. For example in ギャル文字, the ギ{gi} is modified by ャ{ya}(small YA), so instead of reading it "Giyaru" it is read "Gyaru". Most of the time you see the smaller character it will be modifying ...



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