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4

To answer without looking at or copying from anything, 「しかも~~~ときている」 means "On top of all that, it comes with ~~~." This is an exclamatory expression or at least one of surprise. It is difficult to translate 「ときている」 all by itself (and it is not often used by itself, either). There would have to be other "advantages" mentioned in the immediate ...


2

Here, と + 来る is an idiomatic expression. The デジタル大辞泉 entry says: 6 (「…ときたら」「…ときては」「…とくると」などの形で)ある物事を特に取り上げ強調して言う意を表す。特に…の場合は。…について言うと。「酒とくると、からっきしだめだ」「甘い物ときたら、目がない」 which roughly means "used to focus on and emphasize a particular matter; when it comes to; as for". While the examples above don't perfectly match your case, you can get the spirit and ...


-1

It actually is "to kiteiru" not tokiteiru. The salesman is trying to say that the sale is upcoming. This website provides a nice response: http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1144370201 "漢字表現をどうしても当てはめるなら「来ている」になりますが、 補助的な意味ですので、ひらがなで書いた方が望ましいかと思います。" Perhaps rewriting the sentence could be elucidating: "しかもお値段は半額以下と来ている" What's ...


1

シュワー is the sound of something moving fast, in this case, a bullet train. Onomatopoeia in Japanese is quite interesting. It plays a bigger role in everyday Japanese than it does in everyday English. There is common onomatopoeia for Japanese words where we have none for the same words in English. And Japanese speakers will use often different onomatopoeia ...


3

This sentence is frank expression. I think only veteran seller tends to use it. In politely, 品数{しなかず}は少ないですが、種類{しゅるい}においてはその辺{あたり}りのデパート並{な}みです。 So 「おいちゃあ」menas「おいては」. And 「おいては」 is like 「ついては」. I think it can be translated "about" in english. There are few stuffs, but we can competitive with near department stores about a kind of stuffs. If ...


2

恩 - favor or kindness from others that one should be feeling a sense of gratitude toward 義務 - duty rooted in social systems, usually associated with legal senses, such as liability or military service 義理 - duty rooted in personal relations usually friendship. family relations never or rarely come in this category. 人情 - pity or sympathy one feels when ...


3

You can add focus particles like は or も to verbs, but in order to do so, you have to split the verb into two parts so that the particle has some place to go. We'll split the verb into its the continuative stem (called 連用形 in Japanese) and the verb する. For example:   忘れる   → 忘れ+する   忘れる+も = 忘れもする Or:   忘れない   → 忘れ+しない   忘れない+は = 忘れはしない Your example ...


1

ありゃしない in the context means "doesn't exists". So the whole sentence means "This good price doesn't exists anywhere else in this world." By the way, ありゃしない is a spoken form of ありはしない. It consists of ある(exists) + しない(deny).


3

If somebody calls other one ~~奴, I'll assume the referent is the speaker's close (often the same-sex) friend, or someone has frictions with him/her, or s/he is casually mentioning an unspecified person. There's no gender restrictions anyway. As an aside, 奴 can colloquially refer things whose names are unclear to the speaker or hearer, in this case it's even ...


4

Yes, I've heard 奴 used to refer to females before. Of course, it is more frequently used to refer to males. But remember that the rules of grammar and convention are not so strict in casual, colloquial conversation (which is typically where 奴 is used to refer to anyone). Although I've never heard a female refer to herself as 奴 before, I've heard college-age ...


4

済ませる= ”I will let the matter pass” 済まさない= ”I will not let the matter pass” すまさんぞ (済まさんぞ)= ”I will NEVER let the matter pass”


2

しとられん means you can't do something or can't focus on something, because there is something more important. In this sentence, it says when ジョー comes, you can't do businesses anymore. Probably, ジョー is a person who interrupt the businesses. ~ ちゅうて means "(someone) says ~". ちゅうて comes right after the content of what they speak. In this context, 商人 said ...


2

You could omit 数;「[彼等]{かれら}は多い。」. It is grammatically correct, but it is ambiguous on what you are talking about, unless it is clear because of the context. In sentence 「[彼等]{かれら}の[数]{かず}は多い。」, it is somewhat clear you are talking about "number of people" (though still have a little room the sentence can be interpreted differently.) but the meaning of the ...


2

今日の所は良いでしょう。 is roughly equivalent to "That's it for today." The sentence is used by a teacher or a boss and that means the speaker has finished speaking, lesson or anything else he/she want, and the listener(s) can leave now.


4

台 in this context is a short for パチンコ台, a Pachinko machine. やった is the past tense of やる, a verb "to play" in this context. Thus the topic of the sentense is "The Machine which Joe played". ガラス is a glass panel which is placed on the front of a machine. はずしてあった is the past ~てある form of a verb 外す, to remove. Thus the main sentence is "the front glass had been ...


1

やった It's the past (or perfect) form of a verb やる. This word doesn't contain more meaning than "do" does, but compared with する, it slightly emphasizes that the action involves physical movement. According to your context, it'd mean "played" here. 台【だい】 That's the way we casually call machine like in "slot machine". はずしてあった You can refer here for this ...


4

開発 is clearly different from the other two. 開発 means creation, engineering, etc., and 開発する is transitive. コンピュータを開発する means to create/build/engineer computers. As you pointed out, 開発(する) can be used when something new is created. 発展 and 発達 share the similar meaning to a certain extent. コンピュータの発展 and コンピュータの発達 both refer to the advancement of the computer ...


6

「[駅]{えき}の[近]{ちか}くで[食事]{しょくじ}を[食]{た}べました。」 is grammatical but the 「食事を食べる」 part is redundant and unnatural because 「食事」 already means "eating a meal" all by itself. It is not something that more careful speakers would say. 「食事をした」 or 「食事を[取]{と}った」 would sound far "better". It is like saying 「ロペスさんが[日本]{にほん}に[来日]{らいにち}した。」. It is saying "Japan" twice ...


4

ばかこくでねえ is a dialectal way of saying ばかこくんじゃない, ばかをいうな 'Don't be silly.' ばか(を)こく means [馬鹿]{ばか}(なこと)を言う, 'say a stupid thing' 'be stupid'. へえる is a dialectal or collapsed way of saying [入]{はい}る. へえるはずさ, 入るはずさ literally means 'should go in', so probably 'He should go in' 'I'm sure he will go into the Pachiko shop'.


7

「Verb or adjective + の + Same verb or adjective in negative form + の + って」 makes an idiomatic expression meaning: "Is it ever ~~?" or "Does it ever ~~?" In other words, this structure emphasizes the meaning of the verb or adjective. I would be inclined to believe that the sentence is about pachinko. You would need to use more words to write ...


2

Meaning-wise Considering only what a verb means to determine whether it is stative can be somewhat subjective. If we go purely by the semantics, we find as you mentioned the following explanation for the relevant sense: 馬鹿にする。甘くみる。みくびる。あなどる。 As this suggests, underestimate does not convey the nuance of the verb very well. Think of it like this: ...


4

As one of the commenters said 給料 means salary, 収入 means income. In terms of remuneration for a job performed at work these are equivalent. Typically people use 給料 to refer to salary (though also 年収 to refer to yearly salary) 収入 can also refer to income (gross) of a company (one certainly wouldn't use 給料 to refer to sales figures)


2

Aspects in Japanese are complicated. I think there are some concepts at play here which haven't been mentioned. (The below grammaticality assessments are mine.) The tendency to (ability to) use dictionary forms for 1st person, where ている/でいる must be used for 3rd person for some thought/speech verbs, e.g. 私は思う but 彼は思っている. I think the same thing is going on ...


0

As someone else pointed out in the comment, this explains the differences: http://kakeibot.doorblog.jp/archives/37164111.html. Basically, 「収入」is the amount of money you receive from your company before you subtract taxes and health assurance fees. 「給与」(not 「給料」) on the other hand, is that same amount of money that is given to you by the company (as 与 ...


1

Short answer: matcha is correct. I don't know about maccha being represented by any official romanization system, though this is actually the way that the word would be entered in most Japanese input systems, a so-called Wāpuro rōmaji or kana spelling. Long answer: There are different romanization systems, for instance Hepburn romanization, which would lead ...


3

That is actually three words. 「あるほうで」=「ある方で」 「~~[方]{ほう}」 means "on the ~~ side", "relatively ~~", etc. 「かわいげがある」 means "charming in an innocent way". "That is still pretty charming (compared to something else)."


4

「ばあ」 is a colloquial contraction for 「をば」. It is sometimes used in fiction, children's stories, etc. to show that the speaker is an older person. In meaning and nuance, 「ばあ」=「をば」= an emphatic 「を」 https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%82%92%E3%81%B0-666115#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 「そのへんばあねり歩いてるよ」= "(someone) often walks around ...


4

They use ば for the objective particle を in Kyushu dialect. そのへんばあねり歩いて= そんへんばねり歩いて = そのへんをねり歩あるいて


7

One thing I would need to mention is that the significance of 「おやつ」 as a custom has decreased dramatically since Edo period. Japan had largely been a two-meal-a-day nation until around the middle of Edo. There was no such thing as lunch for many people. Naturally, you would become hungry by around 2 o'clock in the afternoon, which was called 「やつ/やつどき」 by ...


3

Yes there are, but it is a grey area if you include rare, uncommon, creative or archaic readings. People can be creative especially when it comes to kun-readings. Even for a kanji usually used only in compounds you might find a stand-alone usage if you're looking hard enough. Some of these need okurigana, eg. 隷う【したがう】 or 悠か【はるか】, but some don't, eg. ...


3

I think おかず refers to side dishes accompanied with rice, while 食べ物 refers to 'food' in general. When Japanese or Chinese eat meals at home, there's usually a bowl of rice per person and several dishes (e.g. fish, meat, vegetable) in the middle. Those dishes are called おかず.


3

There is a clear difference between the two. (I feel for you because I have seen 「おかず」 defined wrongly in smaller bilingual dictionaries.) 「[食]{た}べ[物]{もの}」 refers to any and all kinds of food; It just includes everything people eat. Anything edible is called 「食べ物」. 「おかず」 is different. It is what you eat with rice (or bread) in a meal. It refers to the ...


2

That is no slang. It should be in any dictionary. 大辞林第三版・デジタル大辞泉 「さまになる」 「サマんなんねぇだろ」= 「[様]{さま}にならないだろう」← "dictionary" form 「ん」 is the colloquial contraction for 「に」 here. 「なんねえ」 is the mostly-Kanto colloquial way of saying 「ならない」. 「様になる」 means "to look good", "to look proper", etc. 「様になんねぇだろ」 = "You wouldn't look good."


1

「ほとんど[寝]{ね}てなかったね。[朝帰]{あさかえ}ってきて、ちょっとベッド[入]{はい}って、また[家庭教師]{かていきょうし}[行]{い}って。で、スーパー、その[次]{つぎ}の[日]{ひ}はないようにしてたりです。」 This is written so informally that it almost sounds like it was casually spoken. The 「~~してたりです」 ending is sort of "new" and definitely "in". 「次の日はないようにしてたりです」 ≒「次の日は[仕事]{しごと}がないようにしていたりします」 ≒ "then, I would (occasionally) try not to do ...


1

My money's on onomatopoeia as well, as it's written outside of a speech bubble, like the sniffing sound くんくん and the gulping sound ごく, and it's in the same hand as those. We also see あー in this same format in the same panel as the little girl says 「あー!」. That being said, while しょわー sounds very effervescent, the illustration makes me think it's meant to ...


0

There is no simple rule First of all, let us take a look whether variant pronunciations exist. There are some instances of 兄様【あにさま】, 兄【あに】さん, 姉様【あねさま】, 姉【あね】さん found in several writings accessible on the free digital library 青空文庫, all from authors around 1900. おみの (あたりを窺ひて。)子之介【ねのすけ】は厩にゐると御門で教へられたが、はて何處へ行つたことであらう。 (奧より子之介出づ。) おみの おゝ、弟……。 ...


4

「[自分]{じぶん}で[日本語]{にほんご}を[学]{まな}ぶのは[難]{むずか}しい。」 is nice and grammatical. You could make it sound even more natural by changing 「自分」 to 「ひとり」 or 「自分ひとり」. Furthermore, adult native speakers would use the word 「[独学]{どくがく}」 to mean "to study by oneself". If you were a beginner, though, you would not need to know this word yet; It can wait. One would say: ...


19

In short, that is because "island" is not the only meaning of 「島/しま/シマ」. Besides "island", it can mean "settlement", "arable land by a river", "isolated area", "territory", "turf", "sandbank", etc. Even each section of a supermarket or any sizable store is called 「シマ」. So, it does not have to be the sea water that surrounds a 「島/しま/シマ」. 「[福島]{ふくしま}」 was ...


4

It's ちょっと忠告しに、立ち寄ったんだ。 (I just dropped by to give you a piece of advice. ) in a regional dialect or the role language for old speakers. ~~しに means するために, "(in order) to~~".


3

Thanks to @firtree and the other users in the comments for helping me with this. I'll re-post specifically what @firtree stated: I'm afraid that it would always be hard to read the small-font kanji. Native speakers learn lots of kanji by heart, and see them many times, so they recognize them even with unreadable strokes, from the general outline. ...


2

Adding on to oals' answer: 仕舞う to finish; to close; to do something completely; to put away; to put an end to Common word, Godan verb with u ending, Transitive verb, Usually written using kana alone Source: edict, searchable on jisho.org It seems only しまう and 仕舞う are in common use (the others being rather obscure), and even among those two, ...


7

「ら」 is a plural suffix. In this case, 「山中ら」 just means "Yamanaka and his opponent", not "Yamanaka and his hangers-on". The hangers-on do not need to take a preliminary physical before a boxing match. "Yamanaka and his opponent pass their preliminary physical."


2

Generally speaking, 「無くす」 would be a more versatile word than 「失う」 as the latter is a more nuanced word. While 「無くす」 is an everyday word that even toddlers can use actively and correctly, you will not see small kids using the word 「失う」 in real life. I think it safe to say that 「失う」 is used more often in writing than in speaking. Only 「無くす」 can be used to ...


0

Google searches for this are pretty useful. There are sites like Jisho.org (http://beta.jisho.org/) that can tell you if something is usually written in kana. It also gives you alternative kanji forms. I don't know too many specifics, but the suggestions given by Google or Microsoft Word usually suffice. Please correct my errors though. Here's a good ...


5

It's [一体]{いったい}[何]{なに}を[騒]{さわ}いでいるんだ? or 騒いでいるんですか? "What's the fuss about?" in some regional dialect or the role language for old speakers.


10

Those are good examples of what my favorite writer [筒井康隆]{つついやすたか} has named 「[全国共通]{ぜんこくきょうつう}いなか[言葉]{ことば}」, which I would translate to "All-Japan Standard Provincial Dialect". It is an imaginary dialect, instead of an existing dialect, that is used in stories. Believe it or not, it is most often used in children's stories. (Which is why I rarely ...


6

「いってえ」 is how the "tough Kanto guy" would colloquially pronounce 「[一体]{いったい}」. 「一体」, when combined with a question word (in this case, どう), is the Japanese equivalent of "on earth", "the heck", "the f***", etc. 「この[品物]{しなもの}の[山]{やま}はいってえどうしたことだ。」 = "How on earth did you get all this mountain of stuff?" Depending on the context, there may be a better ...


2

新明解国語辞典 第五版:  せかい【世界】 ① 人間が住んでいたり 行って見たり することが出来る、すべての所。〔狭義では、地球上に存在するすべての国家・住民社会の全体を指す〕 「世界[一]{いち}・世界記録・世界保健機関・第三世界」 ② そのものと その同類で形作っている、なんらかの秩序が有ると考えられる集まり。 「若者の世界〔=仲間〕/魚の世界/学問の世界〔=学問の領域内〕 Sense ② is interesting because it parallels the English word: the animal / plant / insect world; the world of fashion; stars from the ...



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