New answers tagged

0

保証 usually is a guarantee/warranty made by a manufacturer, government, etc. Scientific knowledge from previous research is rarely considered as 保証 if there is no further context. The literal translation of 最低保証密度 is "lowest guaranteed density." It seems to say that if the density is below 75%, something (e.g., chemical reaction) is not guaranteed (usually ...


3

「[方]{ほう}」 has several different meanings and it seems that you are trying to apply one meaning of it to the 「方」 in this context where it is used for another. To be more specific, you are clearly thinking of the "comaparison 方" as in "A rather than B", are you not? In this context, 「方」 is used to mean "the side" as in doers vs. on-lookers. Tousaka is ...


0

Most of the time, 選択 (せんたく) is used.


3

You can say [選択肢]{せんたくし}. 例: 4つの選択肢の中から正しい答えを選びなさい。 (Choose the right answer from the four options.)


3

"With a repetitive (and mechanical) flopping sound" would be my own definition. At least, that should capture the essence of the onomatopoeia in the given context.


0

Gleaning from the comments that this might be a term that originally came from Chinese, one guess would be 崇拝【すうはい】, often glossed as "worship" but with overtones of "admiration, adoration". The traditional form of these kanji is 崇拜, the form still used in written Chinese, with readings of chóngbài (Mandarin), sung4 baai3 (Cantonese), chhùng-pai (Hakka), ...


1

If the text has been laid out properly by a designer the words will wrap right after the particle for more natural flow (が、を、は etc). For a websites in Japanese, because there is no whitespace between characters the sentence is treated as one 'word' and will break wherever it needs to.


3

「[最近]{さいきん}よくじわ[怖]{こわ}スレ[見]{み}てるからビビりになってる。」 This must be a tough one for someone teaching himself Japanese as it is studded with slang. 「じわ」: Short for the onomatopoeia 「じわじわ」 = "gradually", "slowly", etc. 「怖」: Short for 「怖い」= "scary" 「スレ」: Short for 「スレッド」 = "thread (in an internet forum)" So, 「じわ怖スレ」 means "threads that make you feel scared ...


6

(Turning my own comment above into an answer. There will, however, be no references provided as OP requests. Everything I state here comes directly from my head as an average Japanese-speaker.) First off, I would like to make it clear that this is not a question of nuance. This is a question of what I might call the "practical and intentional ...


4

It means nothing, trust me. In manga/anime, authors customarily create weird, non-sense or parodic proper nouns for companies, schools, newspapers, etc. They do so because they are legally not allowed to use real existing proper nouns. There often are, however, "funny" similarities between some of those fictional proper nouns and the real proper nouns ...


-3

The fancy name for this kind of word is Dvandva (from Sanskrit): there is a Wikipedia article on this, but I do not think it is very good. Basically this is a compound made (in Chinese or Japanese, where there is no grammatical case or anything like that) by putting together two opposing or contrasting words, neither or them being the head of the ...


4

文章を[直]{なお}してください is fine. You can also say 書いた文を[訂正]{ていせい}してください because 訂正 gets used a lot and implies that you gotta correct something. You don't use [正]{ただ}す, [訂]{てい}する in daily speech and [改]{あらた}める is used for intangible things like behavior or speech. PS for the Korean version look at the very bottom of this page. CLARIFICATION [訂正]{ていせい} means fix ...


3

「なっ」=「な」=「なあ」 Among those, 「なあ」 would be the "dictionary" form. This is an interjection that is often used to address a person or call someone's attention. One thing Japanese-learners should remember is that we only use this interjection with people who we know well and who are equals or below us in age and/or social status. You do not use it with ...


2

な is basically the same as ね in this context, and it basically just means "hey," or something you use to get someone's attention. A っ at the end of a word just means the last sound is dragged out a bit.


5

θ is Theta, a character from the Greek alphabet that makes the 'th' sound as in 'thin.' It does also describe a type of brain wave . . . and as it happens, 'wave' is the meaning of 波. Now as for what its relevance is, some background music claims to specifically stimulate theta wave production in the brain for enhancing this or that function. Whether or not ...


3

(Just turning my own comment into an answer.) 「[反対]{はんたい}に」, in this context, means 「[逆]{ぎゃく}に」= "contrary to expectations", "contrary to what one might normally expect", etc. If a woman is putting make-up on the platform standing near the track, the "general" expectations would be that it could potentially be dangerous for her (because she is busy ...


6

避難所 is a building with a roof (often a school) where people can stay (potentially for a few days) if their house is destroyed or somehow unreachable. 避難場所 is an open air space (often a park) where people must flee until they are sure that staying in their house is not dangerous (collapsing, fire). Reference: ...


4

(Question 1) Buses in metropolitan areas are commonly (usually?) marked with numbers and letters. I don't know the statistical figure, but most buses have one number, possibly combined with one kanji or alphabet, followed by the destinations (eg. 茶51 秋葉原駅前, ②つくばセンター). Buses in rural areas may only have their destinations (eg. 湯涌温泉(行)). (Question 2) 番 ...


2

To look for a time before the word "Shinto" was used, you must look back to the Asuka period, as the question suggests. At this time, the educated term for Japanese ritual was jingi 神祗. But I would caution against thinking of this as Shinto. The formation of Shinto as a nationwide ideal for ritual, practice, and teaching, did not happen in the classical ...


0

Take into account that 1)Japanese people history in Japanese archipelago started very recently (at the earliest in the Yayoi period) and 2) they imported writing knowledge from China even more recently. Since "Shinto" is a reading that stems from Chinese, most likely, in the same way as current "Nihon" was once read "Hi-no-moto", the original reading was ...


2

This is a way of saying "X is most important". For example: 戦士は目が命 投手は肩が命 I don't think it's very common but it's a nice way of saying that X is invaluable for Y. Check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sch9SXBaD7k She says: 「芸能人は歯が命」


-4

I have no proper source to back this up, but what I've come to understand over time is that because of the respectful nature of Japanese culture, the language reflects this by not having straightforward words for these sorts of things. It's just sort of implied in context. For things like cursing, I believe people would just insult in a different way, rather ...


2

一文字に結んでいる As you guessed, completely closed. Not only supported by the context, but also by the verb 結ぶ, that means to make two things join each other, thus "shut closely". 一文字【いちもんじ】 is a depiction of a straight line so thin that barely has a width. これ以上は閉じられないほど Depends on context, but here the eyelids are shut to the end, as a consequence of #1. 眼の所が It ...


1

Probably ワーホリ which is short for ワーキング•ホリデー (working holiday) which is a type of visa that allows the person to be in the country and work for about 1 year. As a bonus bit of trivia: Usually you are only eligible for that kind of visa before you are 30 years old, so when someone who is 30 gets a working holiday visa because it is their last chance they ...


3

It is possible if the individual/character answering is: male(most likely), stoic, non-talkative, old-fashion (think samurai-stereotype of old) answering a 'thank you' from someone. (Most novels I read with characters answering like this would fit this description). Might be more of a うむ~ but it could be むー depending on the writer or character.


2

Definitely a mistake. The only time I hear of むー is in comics where it's the sound effect for thinking (I think you use hmmm in English). So, my theory is this person heard a conversation like... Akimori: I did your laundry for you. Yamada: Hmmm...but I thought I asked Ken to do it. And might have thought むー was "you're welcome" when it was just the ...


1

It is considered somewhat formal, but you actually don't thank someone for their service to you. It's more or less a cultural thing, in which the person working is expected to perform their job with or without praise. As a result, it can be a little confusing when you thank someone in the service industry for doing their job. It's not like you telling them ...


1

ありがとう、どうもありがとう、ありがとうございます、どうもありがとうございます is polite in order of increasing. I think ありがとう、どうもありがとう is usually used in this context but it is better to use ありがとうございます and どうもありがとうございます for important person like your master.


0

"いくら" means "how much", while "いくつ" means "how many". This is the main difference between the two words. "どのくらい" means "(about) how much" and is very close in meaning to "いくら". The "か" particle on "いくら" and "いくつ" give them both the meaning "some". This, of course carries the meaning of some specific number of discrete things, for "いくつか" and a more analog ...


2

擬声語{ぎせいご}・擬音語{ぎおんご} and 擬態語{ぎたいご}・擬情語{ぎじょうご} In general: Onomatopoeia (Ideophone). Specifically, in order, words that mimic: voices, sounds, states, and feelings. See the wiki article.


0

The difference between those 2 words could also be akin to the US-style 'washroom' (euphemism for toilet) and the direct term 'toilet'. For me, お手洗い could be broken down into to お手 (hands) & 洗い (wash) i.e. 'wash hands' in the washroom, i.e. euphemistically visit the toilet.


6

They are used in different contexts with different but overlapping meanings. 正方形 is a mathematical term for a square (a polygon with four sides of equal length and four angles of 90 degrees). 四角 is a daily-use word for a quadrilateral (a polygon with four sides), and we never use it in mathematics (unless it is part of a compound word). However, in the ...


4

四角 is a diagram which is framed in by four lines on flat, so oblong figure and trapezoid are 四角. 正方形 is a kind of 四角 and it's called "square" in English. It is framed in by four same lines and angles.


10

As shown in @choco's comment above, 「[国]{くに}」 in this context means "one's birthplace", "home province", etc. It is mostly used when one is staying far away from where one was born and raised but is still in the same country/nation. When I am in another prefecture, I am sometimes asked 「国はどこ?」,「お国はどちらですか。」, etc. to which I reply 「[名古屋]{なごや}です」. So, ...


7

In my generation, トイレ is definitely the most common word refers to that facility, over any native word. お手洗い is also usually heard, but whoever says お手洗い in daily conversations would be judged being overly polite or really well-born. Nonetheless, we hear お手洗い more often than not because it's very popular in salesperson-ese, thus you're quite likely to run ...



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