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2

I know you are asking specifically for technology, but for what it's worth, 分かち合う is used a lot in emotional "sharing". As in sharing your feelings, telling a personal story, etc. This is a big word in Japanese Christian lingo; one that I'm very familiar with. Often when someone will give a testimony ([証]{あかし}) of something in their life (an answered ...


10

分け合う and 分かち合う do translate to "share", literally as in "sharing an apple with two other people [by dividing it into thirds]" and figuratively as in "sharing your joys and sorrows with your loved ones". I won't try to distinguish them here because I don't think either word is quite right, so it's not entirely relevant, but I don't think either word is ...


10

You can use 「シェアする」 which is, I believe, used in the context of computer software and websites, apps, etc. Shorter「シェア」is also used, e.g. on Facebook app. I've seen it on some websites, e.g. on Japanese Amazon next to Facebook, Twitter, etc. buttons which is similar to what you want to do. Example from Facebook app: Example from Japanese Amazon:


6

The main differences are in the formality/informality of these words, not really in their meanings. They all mean "to roam about (aimlessly)" and I will mention the small difference in nuance later on. 「ぶらつく」 and 「うろつく」 are more informal than 「さまよう」. The existence of the onomatopoeias 「ぶらぶら」 and 「うろうろ」 should tell you something about the colloquiality of ...


1

でれでれ is also the root of the でれ in ツンデレ, which is used to refer to someone (typically a female) who is rather moody—she's swooning over someone one moment, and knocking him over the horizon the next. Likewise, I've seen デレデレしないで as a request for someone (again, typically female in my observation) to stop fawning all over someone. As to the English word ...


5

Just to confuse things, there is a compilation series released by Columbia Records Japan that seem to use all 3 spellings (I assume deliberately). Although the original album used the spelling 故郷 so read into that what you will. I have mainly come across it as ふるさと personally. !


8

I am going to say that this is more a matter of personal preference than anything. I hate to disappoint the (many) kanji-lovers on here but 「ふるさと」 in kana would be the most-often used way to write the word. 「故郷」 may be used just as often but it is read 「こきょう」 instead at least half the time. 「古里」 looks pretty corny and you will not see it as often as you ...


3

Yes, it's used very much like Versus. However! As Tokyo Nagoya pointed out, バーサス is usable sometimes, too. Plus, occasionally クロス (that is, "X", usually a sign of collaboration) will be used like "Versus" depending on the context. For example, it's "Capcom vs. SNK" in both Japan and the US, but it's "Street Fighter X Tekken" in both territories.


4

Here in Japan these days, I actually see and hear 「[vs.]{バーサス}」 as often as or even more often than 「[対]{たい}」. 「対」 would tend to suggest a physical fight or conflict, so we tend not to use it in other contexts.


2

You answered your own question, pretty much. 対 is used more or less exactly like vs. is in English.


1

I tend to think of ぜひ as 'by all means' but with more of an encouraging undertone. Like the speaker is recommending/hoping you will do something.


7

It is likely [同僚]{どう・りょう} which means "colleague"/"coworker".


6

Those are most commonly called 「[屋台村]{やたいむら}」, followed probably by 「[屋台街]{やたいがい}」, but I recommend that you stick with the former because the latter can also refer to a regular street lined with food stalls. There is one named 「かごっまふるさと屋台村」 in Kagoshima if that is the one you got drunk at last night. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keCZt91Xj1g The word ...


6

I think that 面白い is actually much closer to "funny" than most learners realise, because they think of 面白い as "interesting". It often means "funny", e.g. アキちゃんはちょうおもしろいよね Aki is really funny. Another way of saying "that's really funny", which hasn't been mentioned, is (ちょう)うける


4

You've basically answered your question - the words you've listed are your options. There's pretty much nothing closer to the English word 'funny' than those words; and if there was a more direct translation, it would be unusual enough of a word that it would sound too strange to use in everyday conversation. I'd say to default to 面白い - it would mean ...


2

ぜひ can be used in situations where you want to encourage someone to do something. お腹がすいたら、ぜひフレッシュネスバーガーへ! もちろん can be used in situations where you're replying to an inquiry. お腹がすいた?もちろん、今朝から何も食べなかった There are other contexts and usages, but that's one big difference.


7

I think you should think of ぜひ as "definitely" and of もちろん "of course". There may be a slight overlap in usage, but there's no overlap in nuance.


4

Zokugo-dict says that the word ポイ捨て (litter) is a contraction of ポイと捨てる. And ポイと is an adverb meaning "carelessly/nonchalantly" (throw away/toss aside). It seems that now ポイ捨て got further contracted into just ポイ.


2

I'm not 100% sure if I'm right, but my guess with this is that it just makes the name seem more unique. The Zelda universe is full of unusual names, and this might be a shortcut in Japanese to indicate a slightly more exotic name given the limitations of the syllabic writing system. If I see ナビィ instead of ナビ it makes me think that the "i" sound should be ...


-1

Here try this and tell me if you like it. 食べてみて。。。。 You don't have to eat it but at least try it. 食べなくていいし、ちょっと味だけ見て。 (Thanks Chocolate) I like spicy food so I really want to try taka-no-tsume. 食べてみたい You can't say you don't like tequila if you never even tried a good one! いいテキーラを飲んでみたことがないから。。。 Did you ever try scuba diving? ...


1

Anime characters are often the case since children cannot read kanji. ドラえもん ジャムおじさん タルるート


5

I'll just answer about だてに since @istrasci has explained the rest. [伊達]{≪だて≫} means "just for appearances", as in 伊達メガネ = lens-less glasses. So in this case with the negative (じゃねぇ) it means it's not just for show, it's got a real purpose. だてに拳銃をぶらさげてるんじゃねぇんだぞ! I would translate this colloquially as "This gun ain't just for show, y'know!"


7

I'm not super confident in this answer, so if it's wrong I'll delete it. The first part I believe is something like "When you come talk all this nonsense to me when/after I had lost money on the horse race and am losing it, I could just kill you!" The スって I believe is from [擦]{す}る, and my dictionary has the example [競馬]{けい・ば}で大金をする as "lose a lot of money ...


3

This may serve as an interesting read. It seems to be a list of the license plate numbers that people wanted, sorted in order of frequency. Unfortunately, frequency lists are very difficult to find because they require large amounts of information to be accurate and few people have the resources to gather and subsequently analyze that information.


9

There's even an exceptional word which mixes hiragana, katakana, and kanji, くノ一. Generally speaking, words are written with mixed writing systems when there are reasons to write different parts in different ways. (Sounds obvious, huh?) For example, in Tokyo Nagoya's example of あんパン, the first morpheme comes from Chinese 餡{あん}, and the second from ...


5

There are actually two types of words here. One is [擬音語]{ぎ・おん・ご} which are onomotopoeia: words representing sounds. Some examples of this are ワンワン (dog barking), ガリガリ (scratching, crunching - like ガリガリ君 popsicles), and ころころ (sound of something rolling). The other type is [擬態語]{ぎ・たい・ご} which "depict non-auditory senses". Your examples fall into this ...


4

バグる → (technology) to be buggy, not work correctly; freezing; crashing スマホ、バグッちゃった! → My smartphone froze/crashed/messed up!


5

After reading the first couple of examples in the comments I Googled them and discovered the English Wiktionary actually has an appendix of exactly these terms: Appendix:Japanese words written in mixed kana But they must be quite rare or the appendix very incomplete, because it currently only includes three words (plus one Proper noun): サボる ...


4

Yes - the weird one for me was always サボる because it even conjugates normally.


7

あんパン(bread roll filled with red bean paste)、 ピザまん(pizza flavored steamed bun)、 じゃがバター(baked/boiled potato topped with butter)、 みそラーメン(ramen with miso based soup)、 エロい(horny)、 ダサい(hickish), etc.


2

My sense could be wrong, and I'm sure I'll be told if it is so, but I don't think those words (with one exception) are useful for what you want as in "to try": 味わう = literally to taste the flavor of something as in while you are cooking 嘗める = to lick something -- also a term for when someone is trying to mess with you. 試す = to test something 味見 = to taste ...


10

I think the most universal way of expressing trying is using て-form of a verb followed by みる. For example: 電話してみるよ。 I will try calling you. お好み焼きを食べてみたい。 I want to try eating okonomiyaki. In addition, what you can express in English as "try" as in "have you tried?" is sometimes asking about past experience and can be expressed in Japanese as ...


7

The short answer is "anything that can be described by a word containing 機{き} and can justifiably be one's favourite". As for airplanes, 飛行機 can be considered a type of 機, mostly because it's in the name. Otherwise, 機 is now more often used for 機器 or 機械, machines/devices. I think that, instead of カメラ・写真機, the definitions might as well have referred to a ...


7

Having read it several times, I could only say that that is good writing. It contains no errors, ambiguity or unnaturalness; therefore, it would not cause any misunderstanding among the readers. Mixing active voice with passive voice in a sentence is nothing new in English, is it? Consider the following sentence. "Tofu is made by coagulating soy milk ...


3

You can use まさか with negation. まさか itself means something is unbelievable and not likely to be true. So the sentence following it almost always ends with ない. E.g. まさかもう彼が来た のではないでしょうね。You can split the sentence into two parts-- It's unbelievable that he has already come here. It's probably not true, right? まさかもう彼が来た とは思わなかった. It's unbelievable that he ...


3

I'm not really sure what you mean. Looking at the sample sentences at jisho.org which are Tanaka/Tatoeba, they all fit roughly with that definition. まさか is an exclamation, so it's going to be hard to provide an exactly translation that explains how it's used, but I take it that it is used for surprising information. Looking at the first example: ...


7

The most common word, according to pretty much all the frequency lists I've found, is:  する Although if you count particles and auxiliaries, then の is probably the most common. Sources: Frequency list 1 Frequency list 2 Frequency list 3 Frequency list 4


4

According to Japan Meteorological Agency, by definition, "AのちB" stands for "A for the first half (of the period being forecasted), then B for the latter half." http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/kishou/know/faq/faq10.html Obviously the actual time depends on the "forecast period". Unless otherwise specified, "weather reports for tomorrow" on evening TV shows refer ...


4

Always use 行 (ぎょう) for the lines (in a book chapter, a programming code, etc.), no matter whether the sentence is written horizontally (横書き) or vertically (縦書き). For example, "Removing three lines from the CSS file" is as follows: CSSファイルから3行抜く


2

For what it's worth, I know of psyllium husk powder both in English and in Japanese. I've seen it as サイリウムパウダー サイリウムハスクパウダー サイリウムシードパウダー オオバコの粉末 (サイリウム) in the context of raw food diet recipes (as binding agent). Recipes often just write something like 「サイリウム (オオバコ) 5g」 though, even if the recipe definitely calls for powder. (You can find all ...


1

This is just a helpful guess based on some research (below) but it would be interesting if someone could use this as an example to explain how to come with the expressions such as this, based on potential components. Anyway my final suggestions were: プランタゴ・オバタ種皮の粉末 as per http://kakaku.com/item/K0000571718/ or プランタゴ・オバタ種皮末 as per ...


0

Er... Looks like I had the ability to find out but was looking in the wrong spot. Turns out the loan words "husk" and "powder" are normally used. (ハスク)(パウダー) (I'll probably accept this as my accepted answer in 2 days but if anyone finds any alternative writings that would be great.)



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