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1

紅葉ができて doesn't sound natural. I think [紅葉]{こうよう}する is what you're looking for. For example: [木々]{きぎ}が[紅葉]{こうよう}して、カナダは今美しいです。 Or you could use 紅葉で (Lit. with / because of the red leaves)  紅葉で、今カナダは美しいです。


1

It most often means: "You (should) know the answer deep down."


0

The answer @Unknown gave is perfect if you want more weight and directness to the accusation Hmm.... 「うそつけっ!」, maybe? or 「うそつき!」とか・・ – Unknown May 21 at 22:04


3

It can mean many things with present tense "anymore" 「もうしませんから許してください」 "soon, almost" 「もう終わりますから、しばらくお待ちください」 "again, also, another, the other" 「もう片方の靴下が見つからない」 or it can simply emphasize the speaker's feelings 「これはもう疑う余地のない事実だ」 Source: http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/218382/m0u/ Your example is actually a very good one and gets ...


7

It means somethng like "So, ~~" used when trying to wrap up a convo or explanation. It is mostly an attention-drawer than a meaningful phrase. The 「と」 is, believe it or not, a quotative particle used to refer to the over-all content of the speaker's statement that is now ending.


2

They would sound pretty funny talking with your parents. In fact, a lot of Japanese people use ですます form with their parents. There are a lot of regional dialects in Japan and that could influence their usage (though as you surmise age tends to be the most significant factor), but in this case I think they really are uncommon with younger 関東 people. Maybe ...


5

年をとる means to grow old, to age. Next time try a dictionary first.


1

I think there is no significant difference in meaning between ごめん, ごめんね, ごめんな, and ごめんよ. They all can be used among close friends, either seriously, casually, or even playfully, depending on the situation. Among these, ごめんね sounds a bit mild and girly, and ごめんな sounds boyish. As for ごめんよ, I feel it's a bit less common, and has a small masculine and tough ...


6

「ぶったてる」=「ぶっ建てる」= "to build" 「ぶっ」 is a manly and slangy verb prefix that emphasizes the meaning of the verb. https://kotobank.jp/word/%E6%89%93%E3%81%A3-618986#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 Related verb prefixes for emphasis: 「おっ」、「かっ」、「つっ」、「つん」、「とっ」、「ひっ」、「ひん」、「ぶち」、「ぶん」, etc. There should be a few more.


8

The female equivalent of 主人 is [女主人]{おんなしゅじん}, and you would address your 女主人 as [奥様]{おくさま} or お[嬢様]{じょうさま}. (You wouldn't address her as [女主人様]{おんなしゅじんさま}.)


4

The "dictionary" word is 「[縁]{ふち}」, meaning "side", "edge", "brink", etc. 「っぷち」 is its colloquial pronunciation. 「川っぷち」 = "a river bank" The most common word containing 「っぷち」 would be 「[崖]{がけ}っぷち」, which means "edge of a cliff" literally and "critical point" figuratively.


7

「ようく/よーく」 is an exaggerated pronunciation of 「よく」, which is why it is not found in the dictionary. 「ようくきく」=「良く聞く」


6

I do not believe there would be a word that everyone could agree upon as the word 「イケメン」 itself is pretty new. If you are looking for a new word, we have 「イケジョ」 even though it is not wide-spread yet. More common (and traditional) words include: [美人]{びじん}、[美女]{びじょ}、べっぴん、べっぴんさん, etc. All are safe choices. 「かわいこちゃん」(with only one い) was a very common word ...


3

Because it just means "good looking / handsome man" the female version will be 美人 (bijin) meaning "pretty women". Maybe your also interested into the fairly newly created words デキ女 (dekijo) and デキ男 (dekidan) for a more characterwise coolness in the sense of someone who is successful f.e. in job.


5

~じゃない is not particularly feminine in Standard/Tokyo Japanese, as long as the ない is relatively short (i.e. sticks to the moraic rhythm) and maintains its low pitch. I would say that the longer ない is drawn out, and the more rising pitch it is given, the more feminine it sounds.


-2

Though I'm just making my first steps in the Japanese writing system I would say the three signs stand for Japanese (language). Sign 1 can mean sun, day and Japan Sign 2 can mean book and script; earlier root and origin. Sign 3 is language So the three signs have to be read "language and script of Japan" Kanji for Japanese Edit: I have to correct what ...


4

厚生, 福祉 and 福利 First of all, 福利 and 厚生 are almost outdated words except in legal terms or a combination of 福利厚生 ("fringe benefits" according to WP). 福祉 is the most common word covers "welfare" in every situation today. 福利 particularly refers to benefits or services one can gain from welfare system. And 厚生 literally means "fulfilled life" or "life ...


2

文 refers to a sentence, regardless of whether it's written or spoken. I find no significant discrepancy in usage between Japanese '文' and English 'sentence' here. For example you can say something like 命令文のイントネーション (intonation of an imperative sentence), which unequivocally refers to a spoken sentence.


13

語 is the suffix which means 'language'. Unlike English which needs two different nouns for a country and its language, in Japanese, you can simply add 語 after the name of a country to mean the language spoken in that country. (e.g. ドイツ = Germany, ドイツ語 = German, フランス = France, フランス語 = French) 日本 is one word made of two characters, meaning 'Japan'. ...


3

日 Can also mean "Sun" 本 Can mean "Origin" 語 Can mean "language" If you look at the Japanese Flag ,you will notice there is a big red circle. That is a sun. The sun is a very important object in Japanese folklore. Another thing is that 日本語 refers to the Japanese language which we often just refer to as Japanese


0

つれて is just the て-form of the verb 連{つ}れる whose meanning is "to lead (people)", "to take people (from one place) to another one". And, いくと is the verb 行{い}く + the と particle. In this case と means "when". If you still can figure out the meaning of your sentence, there is a translation in a spoiler.


4

Peanut butter:「[粒入]{つぶい}り(の)」、「つぶつぶ(の)」, etc. Rotten milk:「ドロドロになる/なっている」、「ドロドロの」, etc. Chunky gel: same as rotten milk. If it is very hard, one could use 「ゴツゴツ」、「ゴロゴロ」, etc. I only trust you can change these forms freely according to the context.


7

It's [女帝]{じょてい}. 皇帝 is also used for an empress, e.g.: アンナ(ロシア皇帝)


3

You could use 逃げるんだね as a command, but I don't think you should use it. Here are the reasons. The phrase is commanding the listener to escape, but it also has an extra nuance that the speaker is not concerned about the result the listener's escape, or the speaker thinks the listener can't do it. It sounds ironic. 逃げるんだね also sounds like asking a question ...


5

It is difficult to talk about the phrase 「ごめんなさいませ」 mostly because it is not in wide use (that is unless there actually exists an area that I am unaware of where it is often said). I have probably heard it 2-3 times in my life, but that means only once every 10 years or so. I feel like it has (almost) always been an adult woman who I have heard say it. ...


4

か can follow である in subordinate clauses. For example, 真実であるかは不明。Whether it is true or not is unknown. (You can also say it as 真実かどうかは不明。) か can also follow だ in subordinate clauses, as @snailboat says. For example, なぜだかわからない。I don't know why.


4

Colloquial form vs. "dictionary" form: 「わらってた」=「わらっていた」 「ん」=「の」 「じゃ」=「では」 Put together, 「わらっていたのでは」 means "if you just kept laughing". 「では」, in this context, is like 「だと」 in meaning -- "if". 「なあ...わらってたんじゃわからねえよ。」 thus, means: "Y'know, I don't get the picture if you just keep laughing."


4

ふりかけてきてやった is composed of three verbs, ふりかける, くる and やる. 振りかける is an ordinary transitive verb meaning to sprinkle. くる and やる are called subsidiary verbs (補助動詞), which are already explained in detail here: What is a subsidiary verb? The subsidiary verb くる has several roles, some of which can be a bit tricky at first. From デジタル大辞泉: 9 ...


0

きて = くる = come やった = やる = do きてやった = came and did So that's what those two mean by themselves. However, there is also a verb in the て form before that. て + くる form can mean "come" in time as well as space: もってくる = bring やってくる = do (until now) The second meaning is the opposite of temporal て + いく: やっていく = do (from now on) Also, やった can have a jubilant ...


0

Questions without な or ね, namely straightforward questions sound like you are prompting the listener to answer, and adding な or ね can express your atitude to wonder something (i.e."I wonder ...") besides a straightforward question. So, it more or less softens directness of your tone in asking.


2

@user4092 is right: だ (助動詞 used like a filler) + は.   だ[助動] 2. from デジタル大辞泉 : 終止形「だ」を間投助詞的に用いて、語調を強める意を表す。「それはだ、お前が悪いんだよ」 日本国語大辞典 adds that in such usage, 「ね」「よ」 などを伴うこともある so "それはだね", "私がだよ", etc. are also often seen.


4

「[母]{はは}みたいでよかった。」 could mean "I am glad I look like my mother.", but without any context to explain that you are talking about the physical resemblance, it would usually just mean "I am glad I am like my mother." To express "I am glad I look like my mother." in a single sentence all by itself, you would say: 「[母親似]{ははおやに}でよかった。」 Kids would say ...


4

I only hope that I am thinking of the 「へい」 that you are talking about. The 「へい」 I am thinking of is the 「へい」 that is probably more often heard in dramas and period dramas than in real life which is used by male speakers (at least in Kanto) who are being humble to their superiors. It means the same as 「はい」. ...


7

There are some fixed expressions such as: ご愁傷さまです お悔やみ申し上げます Both are formal, and can be used regardless of the relationship; you can say this to friends/colleagues/bosses. "ご愁傷さま" is sometimes used when nobody dies (e.g. ironically when somebody is disappointed) while "お悔やみ申し上げます" is almost always limited to the context of condolences, but both are ...


4

To answer without looking at or copying from anything, 「しかも~~~ときている」 means "On top of all that, it comes with ~~~." This is an exclamatory expression or at least one of surprise. It is difficult to translate 「ときている」 all by itself (and it is not often used by itself, either). There would have to be other "advantages" mentioned in the immediate ...


2

Here, と + 来る is an idiomatic expression. The デジタル大辞泉 entry says: 6 (「…ときたら」「…ときては」「…とくると」などの形で)ある物事を特に取り上げ強調して言う意を表す。特に…の場合は。…について言うと。「酒とくると、からっきしだめだ」「甘い物ときたら、目がない」 which roughly means "used to focus on and emphasize a particular matter; when it comes to; as for". While the examples above don't perfectly match your case, you can get the spirit and ...


-1

It actually is "to kiteiru" not tokiteiru. The salesman is trying to say that the sale is upcoming. This website provides a nice response: http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1144370201 "漢字表現をどうしても当てはめるなら「来ている」になりますが、 補助的な意味ですので、ひらがなで書いた方が望ましいかと思います。" Perhaps rewriting the sentence could be elucidating: "しかもお値段は半額以下と来ている" What's ...


1

シュワー is the sound of something moving fast, in this case, a bullet train. Onomatopoeia in Japanese is quite interesting. It plays a bigger role in everyday Japanese than it does in everyday English. There is common onomatopoeia for Japanese words where we have none for the same words in English. And Japanese speakers will use often different onomatopoeia ...


4

This sentence is frank expression. I think only veteran seller tends to use it. In politely, 品数{しなかず}は少ないですが、種類{しゅるい}においてはその辺{あたり}りのデパート並{な}みです。 So 「おいちゃあ」menas「おいては」. And 「おいては」 is like 「ついては」. I think it can be translated "about" in english. There are few stuffs, but we can competitive with near department stores about a kind of stuffs. If ...


3

恩 - favor or kindness from others that one should be feeling a sense of gratitude toward 義務 - duty rooted in social systems, usually associated with legal senses, such as liability or military service 義理 - duty rooted in personal relations usually friendship. family relations never or rarely come in this category. 人情 - pity or sympathy one feels when ...


5

You can add focus particles like は or も to verbs, but in order to do so, you have to split the verb into two parts so that the particle has some place to go. We'll split the verb into its the continuative stem (called 連用形 in Japanese) and the verb する. For example:   忘れる   → 忘れ+する   忘れる+も = 忘れもする Or:   忘れない   → 忘れ+しない   忘れない+は = 忘れはしない Your example ...



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