Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

行く means "go", 出る means "leave, depart" and 出かける means "leave this place for some errand to do elsewhere". So 川へせんたくしに行く and 川へせんたくに出かける (as well as 川へせんたくしに出かける) make hardly any difference, but you wouldn't be likely to say 地獄{じごく}へ出かける unless you're something like "underworld detective".


3

In addition to @l'électeur's answer, we also commonly say 肩【かた】を組【く】む when two or more people put their arms on one another's shoulders.


4

Most commonly, we would say: 「(Person)の肩{かた}に腕{うで}をかける」 or 「(Person)の肩に腕を回{まわ}す」 I actually could not think of another phrase.


0

とくと is used when you're trying to check on something thoroughly. It is another form of totteyoku とってよく. Take something in one's hand to have a good look. 何かを手にとってよく見る


2

If I were you, I would say 'Xを食べるよう進化した' ( X wo taberu you shinka shita ).


6

「とくと」 means 「よく」= "carefully", "thoroughly", etc. It should be found in any small monolingual dictionaries. The word is not really archaic; It is just not used often in informal conversation. It is used quite often in dramatic- or theatrical-sounding imperative or request asking one to do something thoroughly just like in your example. In other words, ...


1

まねをする means to mimic someone's movement. ふりをする means to behave as if you are that person, or disguise yourself as that person.


5

For your purpose, the most often-used word would be 「話{わ}」 followed probably by 「回{かい}」, but not 「挿話{そうわ}」. 「挿話」 is more like an "anecdote" or a little "side-story". Ordinally, we say 「第{だい}(number)話{わ}」 or 「第{だい}(number)回{かい}」 . Cardinally, we say 「(number)話」,「(number)話分{わぶん}」,「(number)回分{かいぶん}」, etc. "I watched 13 episodes so far." = ...


7

Here's a question: are you sure that your characterisation of the situation is accurate? Are all, or the majority, of new words in Japanese created by importation from other languages? Do you have any statistics about this? It's often relatively obvious to English speakers when we see a katakana word imported from English, but how do you know you're not ...


4

First of all, 「おつかれさまでしたどぞ」 is not a common phrase at all. From your description, however, I am pretty sure what was going on. The Japanese counterpart of "Over" used in wireless communications to mean "a message is complete" is 「どうぞ」 and it is often pronounced like 「どぞ」 to shorten it. Thus, I would think that the boss was kidding by speaking like he ...


3

I'll take a stab at it. I would say not really. Since you say you have a long name and your friends call you ナッちゃん, that's already a short form of your name and using that to refer to yourself may make you appear childish (as mostly young females refer to themselves in third person, unless you're going for that young person vibe). Stuff like ナは今帰る sounds ...


1

「~~とかいう歌{うた}」 means "the/that song called something like '~~'" 「は..な」 does not mean "flower". Not at all, I am afraid. Those are two particles so it is pronounced 「わな」. 「は」 is the subject marker, naturally, and 「な」 is an interjectory particle used for assertion and/or persuasion. 


1

As @naruto's answer already gives one of the best solutions based on your principle, I'd just like to show an example what I would naturally say it in Japanese, for your reference: おかげで、帰りの車の中でまでニヤニヤしてたもん。 Apparently it's too hot today to explain how I've transformed your original English into mine.


3

If you need to explicitly include everything — "to home", "to return/go back" and "to drive" — you have to say "運転して家に帰る途中". But 家に is usually obvious, and can be omitted. ニコニコする in this context sounds a bit funny to me. The common and handy word for this is 思い出し笑い, and the most common mimesis of 思い出し笑い is ニヤニヤ, not ニコニコ. ニヤニヤ is used both when ...


0

I'm not a native speaker so it might not be the most natural way to say it but I would say : このままではクリスマスになったらペラペラだよ I don't understand why you want to use 【で】 or 【に】 here, the only 【に】 I would use is with 【~になる】. You should explain why you would use these particles and when, make some examples, it would be easier for us to see where you're stuck at.


2

【帰る】 is the plain form. 【帰れる】 is the potential form, so to express that you can go back.


3

「なんざ」=「なんぞ + は」, originally. 「~~なんぞは」⇒「~~なんざあ」⇒「~~なんざ」 The last two are heard almost exclusively around Kanto. Meaning: Same as 「なんかは」 or 「などは」. ("Stuff like ~~", "~~ and such", etc. )


3

Provided you mean 2.2 of this -> http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/identify by "to identify with", I would say 主人公に共{きょう}感{かん}できる? or  主人公に感{かん}情{じょう}移{い}入{にゅう}できる? Caveat: the above are not verbatim translations.


1

I would say このまま続ければ、クリスマスまでには話せるようになるわよ for If we continue at this rate I will be able to speak by Christmas. Caveat:"If we continue at this rate" literally (= in a verbatim fashion) translates into "私達がこの速さで(努力を)継続すれば". See 1.1 of this -> http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/rate .


3

There are many ways to say "at this rate" in Japanese but the more common ones are: 「この調子{ちょうし}だと/なら」、「このペースだと/なら」、「このままいけば」, etc. Any one of these would fit your sentence with no problem. Regarding 「この分{ぶん}」, you could use it by adding 「なら」 or 「だと」 to it, but not 「に」 as you formed it. You cannot say 「この分に続いたら」, though it was a nice try. You can say ...


3

Yes, 「7分の1」 means same as 1:7 mathematically. 1:7 = (1/8):(7/8) = (1/8)/(7/8) = (1/8)x(8/7) = 8/56 = 1/7 However, in Japan, kids are taught that 1:7 is 「[比]{ひ}」 and 1/7 is 「[分数]{ぶんすう}」. I guess that 「比」 is translated as "ratios", and 「分数」 is translated as "fractions" generally. So, Japanese people tend to think that 1/7 is not a ratio, maybe. In ...


0

"なんざ" is a colloquial form of "など" + "は". Thus I would translate パンチに理屈なんざ無用だい into No reasoning/justification is necessary for punches/fist-fighting.


7

Not exactly (as several have commented). This is how you talk about fractions in Japanese: 7分の1 → 1/7 Literally, you can think about it as 'one part of seven'. It is not a ratio, i.e. 'one part to seven parts', as that equates to 1/8.


0

Yes. n / m = n : m is written m分のn, where "m" and "n" are positive integers. BTW, is 人間の身体能力は、吸血鬼の身体能力の7分の1しかありません more acceptable for you? * added * I just learned that the notation n : m confuses some people. Here is what Hans Lundmark pointed out to me in regard of the usage of n : m. I hope this helps to resolve their confusion. ...


10

When I hear: 「面白いマンガ」 「面白い冗談・ジョーク」 「面白いことを言う」 「面白い芸人」「面白い顔」「面白い服装」 I would normally think the 面白い is used as "funny", "comical", "makes you laugh", or maybe "queer", etc. When I hear: 「このゲーム/本/映画、面白かったよ。」 「(テレビで)今日、何か面白い番組やってる?」 「ディズニーランドとユニバーサルスタジオジャパンのどっちが面白い?」 「俺と勝負しろ!」--「面白い。相手になってやろう。」 「ドイツ語の勉強は面白いです。」「大学の勉強、面白い?」 ...


-1

What is the "feeling" a Japanese person gets upon hearing the word 面白い -> 日本人が「面白い」という言葉を聞いて得る"感覚"は何ですか? I think Japanese is a very interesting language. -> 日本語 が/は 興{きょう}味{み}深{ぶか}い言語であると私は 思います/考えます。 FYI, Oxford English Dictionary says "interesting = arousing curiosity or interest; holding or catching the attention." * added * 面白い can mean ...


1

狡{ずる}い = "sly / dishonest / sneaky." And 狡{ずる}そうな = "looks sly / dishonest / sneaky." Does this help?


5

In general, 予約 is the word you would want to use in this situation. It can be an appointment or a reservation. Regarding the other words you listed, 待ち合わせ is usually used to refer to waiting for someone at a particular place and time, like meeting your friend at the subway station's north exit at 2pm. That would be your 待ち合わせ場所 and 待ち合わせ時間. This also ...


7

真綿感 itself is not an idiomatic phrase, but this 真綿感 is a weak reference to the well-known idiom 真綿で首を絞める, meaning "something unpleasant is happening very slowly", "to torture slowly by an indirect means", etc. And this 真綿 (floss silk) represents something 'indirect', 'vague', or 'fuzzy'. In the linked example, the author was disappointed by the quality of ...


5

I would say 予{よ}約{やく}をお願{ねが}いしたいのですが for "I'd like to make an appointment. (when for example calling up a doctor's practice)" and 外{がい}国{こく}の運{うん}転{てん}免{めん}許{きょ}を日{に}本{ほん}のものに切{き}り替{か}えたいのですが、予{よ}約{やく}をお願{ねが}いします for "I'd like to make an appointment to change my foreign driver's license into a Japanese one. (when calling up the prefectural ...


1

Altogether, it would mean something on the lines of "Each and every of his memories turned black." I left it as "turned black" because, even though I understand that it probably means that he's lost them, as I'm not aware of the context, I can't offer a better suited adaptation. Still, as you see, chaining up expressions that translate to the same in ...


2

「つなぎゃ」 is the colloquial pronunciation of 「つなげば」= 「繋げば」 The meaning of the sentence 「はてね その先はどうつなぎゃいいんだ。」 is highly contextual. 「つなぐ」 can mean "to tie", "to fasten", "to connect", "to keep something going", etc. I would be inclined to think that it would be about keeping a story/explanation going in a logical manner -- something like "How should I keep it ...


0

I guess the appropriate expression for "please don't be cold to me" may depend on the situation. One possibility is "お手{て}柔{やわ}らかに" which means "please do not be harsh on me." Or you can say "冷{つめ}たくしないでよ" if you prefer more straight (= non euphemistic) expression. And for "did you tell XY to not be cold to me?" I would say ...


6

The general construction is ~返{かえ}す. Let me list an example: to bite back = 噛{かみ}付{つ}き返{かえ}す Remember, however, this construction has a negative connotation. In the case of "to kiss someone back" I would say キスのお返しをする.


11

Not being much of an immigration-based country, many Japanese people are often not consciously aware of the distinction between, for instance, "Chinese-Malaysian" and "Chinese living in Malaysia". The "proper" ways to express those are: 「中国系{ちゅうごくけい}マレーシア人{じん}」 = "a Chinese-Malaysian" 「マレーシア在住{ざいじゅう}の中国人」 = "a Chinese (citizen) living in Malaysia". The ...


0

"I recently learned how to speak Japanese." I would translate this differently depending on what the message you wish to convey. "Watashi ha saikin, nihongo wo manandeimashita." <- Lately, I have been studying Japanese. "Nihongo wo hanaseru you ni natta no ha saikin deshita." <- It was only recently that I become capable of speaking in Japanese. ...


1

Passing judgement about your own Japanese skills while talking with a Japanese native speaker is a little strange. I'd recommend: "日本語{にほんご}ができるようになっている気{き}がしています。" (1) "気{き}がしています" adds the meaning that your opinion about your Japanese skills is yours alone. (2) The present continuous tense "~~になっている" adds the meaning that you think that you are on the ...


0

I would say 私{わたし}は最{さい}近{きん}、日{に}本{ほん}語{ご}会{かい}話{わ}を習{なら}いました, or 私{わたし}は最{さい}近{きん}、日{に}本{ほん}語{ご}の話{はな}し方{かた}を習{なら}いました. Remark: 私 = I 最近 = recently 日本語 = Japanese 会話 = conversation 習う = to learn 話し方 = how to speak


2

It's 激 for 激しい・非常に and the ギレ comes from 切れる・キレる, so it means "to snap", "to lose one's temper" in an extensive manner. Maybe you could say "to freak out" in terms of anger. Because it's 激, you're good to think of an externally visible behavior.


0

My friend, when teaching Japanese in English, found out about a long verb, "arawaresasewaremashta" in an old book. It means "the river spontaneously appeared", but I'm not sure if it is still used.


3

ス in this case is a colloquial shortening of です. I think the reason people write it with Katakana is that it makes it easier to tell that's a new word rather than んす being a typographical error for something else. If you look for っす you can find entries that explain that this is a [丁寧]{ていねい} colloquialism (http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%A3%E3%81%99). ...


9

I'm Japanese and don't know well about the English idiom "to be out of it." But I think I know some useful Japanese words for your situations.        「頭が働かない」 This expression is natural to say when you have a cold, fever or other bad condition and can't understand or think about things well temporary. "I'm sorry I have a cold so I'm a bit out of it." ...


6

Yes, it means すみっこ. They say it's 静岡{しずおか} dialect. Source 1・Source 2


0

A couple of possible alternatives to @eltonjohn's answers are なぜか, なんとなく, and どういうわけか.


2

最近なんだかぼーっとしてる is excellent. I would say なにやら反応したようだね for "I saw you reacted (to this) somehow". (Actually, どうやら is a better translation for "somehow" alone, but どうやら反応したようだね sounds more of "Looks like you reacted" than "you reacted somehow". 何{なに}やら is an adverb formed by なに + やら. I can't give you the exact grammatical explanation for やら, but it helps to ...


4

警備員 and ガードマン are both common, while the former sounds a bit more formal, and the latter is commonly used in conversations. I don't think ガードマン is less respectful at least in Japanese. 守衛 is not the most common word. Strictly speaking, 警備員 and 守衛 are legally different (see the third question in this page). 警備員 is the official name of a certain profession ...


1

I would say 昨日{きのう}Johnに会{あ}ったかい? for "Did you meet John yesterday?" その筈{はず}だったけど、彼{かれ}にキャンセルされた for "I was supposed to but he cancelled." (彼が中止{ちゅうし}した, if you like non-transliterated words, but this sounds stilted.) 宿題をやらなければならないが、全然やりたくない for "I am supposed to do my homework but I really don't want to."


9

朝鮮 comes from the Joseon dynasty, which is the longest-lasting Korean dynasty, whose rule lasted from the late 14th century all the way to the late 19th century. The use of this name can be chronicled in Chinese records from as early as 100 BC. After the fall of the Joseon dynasty, the Koreans changed their country name to 大韓帝国 "Daehan Jeguk," or the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included