New answers tagged

2

I'd translate it to be: "It'd be sad to only have the words いい香り and 臭い...". In the sense that having only two words to describe smells would be a lonely or desolate set of vocabulary.


3

Using 寂しい in this way is common. "Makes your explanation limited" is probably too objective as a translation of 寂しい. This 寂しい refers to a speakers subjective impression, and it means "I would feel I'm missing something". Of course the author is trying to share his/her feelings with the readers here, but basically this 寂しい is his/her own feelings.


1

1人じゃない = 1人ではありません。 Consider that the negative form of “です" is “ではありません",which can also be “じゃありません" So I think “じゃ” is used as a simple form of"では".


2

In subordinate clauses like these, ONLY が can be replaced by の (and only when the verb follows immediately after, to prevent confusion with the other Noun+の+Noun meaning). を, で, and other particles cannot be replaced by の in subordinate clauses. For example: ○ 私が作った料理 → 私の作った料理 ○ 木村が買った本 → 木村の買った本 The phrase「絵の描くのは」is valid if the picture is the ...


6

本当 is an adjective itself (some people call it no-adjective; 本当だ "be true", 本当に "really") true as opposed to wrong, apparent, untrue, lying proper as opposed to impure, inaccurate, questionable real as opposed to fictitious, imaginary 本物 is a noun itself (本物だ "be a/the true thing", 本物に "to a/the true thing") a genuine thing as opposed to a fake, ...


2

組み合わせ is combination/ grouping. Literal meaning: 組み group 合わせ match/ matching This is unfortunately not proper for padlock. It would give an entire whole different meaning if you are asking for matching padlock (in terms of shape, color, etc. to other padlock/ item that makes the original padlock looks better)


0

ですか -> for questioning. For ex: 安いですか Is it cheap? ですが -> for reasoning. For ex: 安いですが But it is cheap... Japanese people tend to use the second one, as it is one form where they are asking indirectly to get better approach/ solution or to ask another thing behind that.


2

本当 = really/ the truth/ truthly (adverb) 本物 = the actual/ real object (object) In your sentence 本当の人 does not make any sense. Common use with 本当 is: 本当は (The truth is) 本当に? (Oh really?) 彼は本当のことを言っている (He is telling the actual truth) When people talk about 本物, they are usually comparing the fake/ similar vs the real one. For ex: このプラスチック食品はおいしそう。本物みたい。...


2

A dictionary says interestingly that 本物 means 本当のもの(こと) and 本当 means 本物のもの(こと), that is to say, they have the same meaning of "real". However 本当 has some meaning like "true", and 本当 may be used more as the meaning of "true" than "real", so Japanese native might correct 本当 as 本物. I also think 本物 is more common as the meaning of "real" than 本当.


3

どうして can indeed become どして in a hasty and slangy conversation/chat, but ですか never contracts to ですが. It's no shorter in the first place! Both ~ですが and ~ですか are perfectly valid Japanese with completely different meanings. そうですか。 "Oh, is that so?" / "I see." / "Okay." どうしてですか。 "Why is it?" そうですが。 ≒ そうですけど。 "That's true, but..." / "Yes, but..." (sort of ...


6

You can use ばれる (intransitive verb), ばらす (transitive verb), or more specifically, ネタばれ (noun, sometimes suru-verb). 彼はタイトルにオチを入れてジョークをばらしてしまった。(literally) タイトルでオチがばれてしまっている。 そのギャグはタイトルでネタバレになってしまっている。 まだ見てないから、ストーリーをばらさないで! まだ見てないから、ネタバレしないで! ばらせる is the potential form of ばらす.


2

These are examples about them. 総合格闘技(MMA), パンチ(punch), けり(kick), 立ち技 and 打撃(punch and kick), 寝技(ground fighting), 関節技(locking technique), 落ちる(faint). If you want to know about them more. This link help you. http://seesaawiki.jp/w/hakoyanagi/


5

[暗証番号]{あんしょうばんごう} is the appropriate word for those cases. The same word is used for bank account PINs and ten-key door lock pass codes as well.


5

How about 番号{ばんごう}? as in 暗証番号


1

It's obvious that it means "I have only one" here though it's technically a nonsensical phrase that mixes たった ひとつ きり(だが)with たった ひとつ きり しか ない. (きり is equivalent to だけ.) なまじ means "half-way" or "not thoroughly". 本人の為を思っているこの目: this eye that thinks of his own benefit なまじの肉親以上に: more than his mere real parents たったひとつっきりないが * : though it's only one


0

In current Japanese, just 死ぬ{しぬ} according to this.


1

The only two ぬ verbs are 死{し}ぬ "to die" and 往{い}ぬ・去{い}ぬ "to go somewhere; to go away". Note that inu is obsolete, and is not used in modern Japanese. This verb thus technically is not godan, but rather yodan, as it has no -o ending in the Classical Japanese conjugation paradigm. There is a bit more information at the Japanese Wikipedia's article on the ナ変{...


7

The other answers are mainly correct, but they leave out the part that this is usage of 黙っとる or 黙っとれ are still common in certain dialects, mainly western Japan. Some say the dividing line is somewhere between Shizuoka prefecture and Aichi prefecture. Once you go west of Aichi prefecture you hear the とる form a lot, like in phrases as 知っとる (知っている) or やっとる (...


7

There is another subsidiary verb, おる, in its imperative form. 黙っておる can be contracted to 黙っとる (see this chart). おる is mainly used to make a humble expression, but it's also used as an arrogant, dialectal or a bit old-fashioned version of simple いる. お・る〔をる〕【▽居る】 ㋑「いる」の古風な、または尊大な言い方。また、「いる」に比べて方言的な響きを帯びる。「君はそこに―・ったのか」「都会にはセミも―・らんようになった」 So it just ...


4

社会運動: (noun) "social movement" 家【か】: (postfix) "-ist", "-er" 社会運動家: (noun) "social activist" (neutral) 標榜: (noun, suru-verb) "advocate" 社会運動標榜: "social-movement-advocating" ゴロ: (noun, jargon) "public enemy", "person/group who does illegal actions" (from ゴロツキ "rogue", "thug") So 社会運動標榜ゴロ is "social-movement-advocating" + "rogue". It refers to an ...


3

I found an excerpt from here. It looks like he went out with his 先輩{せんぱい} for the first time drinking, in which he never drank before and felt very nervous. Then his 先輩 says: その代わり笑わしてな。でも、俺が真面目に質問した時は、ちゃんと答えて So he feels under a lot of pressure to make his 先輩 laugh, also they have a very quick exchange back and forth where he is under a lot of ...


2

We often use 緊張して吐きそうになる, which means "I am almost throwing up under tension/pressure." Tokunaga was so nervous that he was almost throwing up.


3

From my understanding, Tokunaga is talking about how difficult it is to get laughs from the audience and how much effort is required - in this case, to the point of vomiting. 「吐く」 is normally not used to express laughter.


-1

「せんでもいいのか」 = 「しなくてもいいのか」 「せん」 = 「しない」 せん・せぇへん is a common way to say しない especially in Kansai. You can see something similar in the Standard Japanese「すみません」 In 時代劇 on TV, they often say せぬ which is a literary equivalent of せん.


3

In this phrase, せん is not 線。 せん is しない (don't do) in some dialects. I think the blank between したくを and せん makes it difficult for you to understand. したくをせん means "don't prepare". したく (支度 in kanji) is preparation. So the phrase ジョーにあいにいくしたくを せんでもいいのか means "Would it be okay for you to be not prepared to meet Joe?"


2

かこっかな is a more casual way of かこうかな(書こうかな), and 〜うかな means "I'm wondering if I should 〜." So the phrase means "I'm wondering if I should write something". I don't know the whole sentence but かこっかな means this.


3

Yes, it's short for やってやる. Please see this answer for the list of similar contractions. I think this contraction is common throughout Japan regardless of generation (but it sounds relatively masculine) And te-form + やる means not only "to do something for someone" but also "dare to do something", "to do something proactively with an active effort", etc. See: ...


2

If you simply cannot produce the Japanese sound, it'll work. I know someone who always used the English R, and it didn't sound as strange to my Japanese friends as it did to be as an American. R, L, and the Japanese consonant all sound similar to Japanese people, but not to me. But, even if it sounds alright, you'll ultimately have a harder time speaking. ...


3

晴れて is a adverb and it means "overtly","publicly","openly". So 晴れて自由の身だ means I am openly free. See 晴れて in goo 辞書. For example, 晴れて夫婦になる, 晴れて無罪となる.


3

To expand on Matt's answer somewhat, I have a dim memory of reading somewhere that the final り in these adverbs is derived from classical あり (modern ある, to be). Digging around in my sources at the moment, I cannot find where I read this. That said, this functions here in many ways nearly identically to the auxiliary verb (助動詞{じょどうし}) り, which is analyzed ...


4

No, there's no particular reason to suppose an etymological connection between /kuri/ and the other two words. This /-ri/ ending is very common in mimetic adverbs, and indeed we find the expected related term /mukumuku/ as well. There is no /zuguzugu/ that I'm aware of, but according to the Nihon Kokugo Daijiten there is a dialect word /zugumu/ which means "...


1

This repeated そう are kind of aizuchi 相槌. It might be regarded as a backchannel also. (I'm not a linguistic expert.) As you may know, native Japanese often use the combinations of verbal and non-verbal backchannels like そうそう/うんうん and nodding during the conversation. This small study shows some numbers.


1

I think 横切る is often more proper when the subject of 横切る interrupts some flow. 道を横切る makes me imagine someone crossing a road by interrupting the traffic flow. 道を横断する doesn't make me imagine such situation. 不安が横切る is like an anxious feeling crosses one's mind interrupting other thoughts. 大名行列の前を/カメラの前を横切る is exactly interrupting a flow of 大名行列 or visible ...


4

(As I noted in the comments,) さらさら is a mimetic word symbolic of such related but varied qualities as "smoothness of texture," "freedom from wetness or ickiness," "ease or fluidity of movement," etc., in addition to a light, rustling sound. As for the nappies case, the word describes the dryness and comfortableness of the material (and the retention of it ...


-1

It is most commonly used for shampoo. It means silky smooth. (Even to a lesser degree, you can use the word さらさら


0

さらさら means that something is less sticky and to be smoothly rubbed.


0

I'm a newcomer just like you and I might make mistakes, so please wait for outside opinions before deciding whether you can trust my answer. 成績評価の甘い授業 Here 成績評価の甘い is a characteristic of 授業. 甘い is used in the sense of "generous". So all together it means: Teaching/lessons with generous grading. 成績の安売り Here 安売り is used in a figurative ...


1

This is perhaps irrelevant for your case but 横断する is very tightly associated with a road while 横切る can take something other than a road as an objective: 大名行列の前を横切ったイギリス人 A Brit who cut across in front of the Daimyo samurai parade Otoh I think it's a bit awkward to say 大名行列の前を横断したイギリス人


1

"そう、そう、そう" implies strong agreement and affirmation with the remark of the other. To me, it's very different from simple and curt "そう." She is saying "It's really delicious" and demanding affirmation of the other on her statement and judgement. We usually and casually say "そう、そう" in agreement, but don't repeat "そう" so many times. But she repeated it four ...


3

This is a simple and casual question, but it doesn't mean the answer would be likewise. Sometimes a very basic notion in a language turns out to be completely absent in another. One of my favorite examples is "Framing a question whose answer is an ordinal number" on English.SE. So, conclusion first, if you ask this to native speakers, I'm afraid answers ...


3

I interpret the given sentence literally as; “What is the thing that can cut various things in a (perfect) half when two parts of it work together as a complete unit” And the answer would be "a pair of scissors." Kenkyusha's “新和英中辞典- New Japanese English Dictionary - 5th Edition” gives definitions of "一人前" as follows: a portion for one person. grown-up, ...


5

That で in bold is the continuative form of the copula だ, as in "私は会社員で、妹は大学生です". So it's basically "and". 一人前 in this sentence means full-fledged, mature, etc. What is the etymology of 一人前? ふたりで一人前 literally means "(becomes) full-fledged by two people" or "full-fledged when there are two people". Riddles often use personification like this, and it just means ...


4

横断(する)is 音読み. 横切る is 訓読み. Both are saying the same thing - crossing the road. As common with 音読み mode which follows old way of Chinese writing and pronounciation (both 漢音 - Chinese language spoken in 汉 (Han) during Bc 206 through AD 220 and 呉音 spoken in 呉 (Wu) during AD 222 through 280), 横断 might sound a bit stiffer than 横切る. But we say quite casually "...


7

How about [膨大]{ぼうだい}なコレクション? (And I thought of [収集]{しゅうしゅう} for "collection", but 「膨大な収集」 doesn't sound good...) I have vast collection of baseball cards. Your sentence would (rather literally) translate to: (私は)野球カードの膨大なコレクションを持っています / 所有しています。 Note that this sounds quite formal, and maybe a bit literary or stiff. If you're looking for an ...


6

広辞苑 published by 岩波書店 carries the word, "殷富 (いんぶ)" and defines it as ”盛んで豊かなこと、富み栄えること – rich and flourish.” 基礎中国語辞典(Basic Chinese Japanese Dictionary) published by 講談社 carries "殷富 (yinfu)" and defines it as “非常に富んでいる – being very rich.” 現代汉語詞典 (Modern Chinese Language Dictionary) published by 中国商務印書館 also carries "殷富" and defines it as “丰盛、丰富 ‐ ...


4

I didn't know the meaning and the reading of 殷富. I was able to guess the reading because a similar kanji is used in a not-so-rare compound 慇懃無礼【いんぎんぶれい】 (殷 seems to be a variation of 慇, according to Wiktionary). But as for its meanings, I had no idea. 殷 is not in the Joyo kanji list. 殷 is the name of an ancient Chinese dynasty (I barely remember learning it ...


1

Look at the 例文 on weblio: http://ejje.weblio.jp/sentence/content/%E6%AE%B7%E5%AF%8C The references are all to historical place and people names, dating about 1000 years ago. On the bright side, you'll be only one able to pronounce that difficult kanji on the tourist information board.



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