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2

人情【にんじょう】 is a common (and maybe a bit nostalgic) word which refers to (good) human emotion. You can basically think 人情 includes 友情 (friendship), 愛情 (love), and compassion toward others in general. 人性【じんせい】 is very rare at least as a Japanese word, and I don't know how to use this term. Google gives Chinese articles about 人性 in the first page, although I ...


0

人情 is affection or kindness while 人性 is human nature that's relatively used in negative connotation.


3

Moderate kuzushiji style based on modern orthographical standard (like this or this) is widely accepted and well understood. Some people are actually fond of writing in such style, so maybe you'll need to learn how to read them in private letters and fancy cards. Meanwhile, hardcore historical kuzushiji stored in archives and museums (like this or this) is ...


3

I don't know whether it's technically considered archaic, but unless you're working at a museum, I don't think you'd even need to know how to read kuzushi-ji, let alone write it. It would be a cool skill to have, but you'll never need it in day-to-day life. I lived over there for about a year and have worked as a translator for seven, and the only kuzushi-ji ...


3

えぐり is the 連用形 (continuative form) of えぐる, which means "to hollow out", "to gouge" えぐり + 込む is a 複合動詞 (compound verb). The second verb (後項動詞) in a compound usually loses its original meaning. A small list of such verbs can be found in this fluentu article. 込む alone can be translated as "to be crowded", whereas this meaning is lost here and it's more ...


3

Both ひとまえ and にんまえ exist. 人前【ひとまえ】:(noun) public place; front of the audience. 人前【にんまえ】: (counter) portion of, often for meal. 1 serving = 1人前【にんまえ】. 人前【じんぜん】(式【しき】) : (noun) A certain irreligious style of wedding, as opposed to Christian-, Shinto-, or Buddhism-style weddings.


-1

1) There are days where we are together. 紡いだ I think of as weaving the fabric of the day by being together. 2) 本当はいつも means In truth, there has always.... Note the has is because the sentence is overall past tense. So it means overall like: In truth, there has always been a certain someone there, regardless of the situation I was in 3) いくつも as ...


8

「で」is the Kansai equivalent of 「よ」, so it's 「見なおした」+「で」 見なおしたで~ is the same as 見なおしたよ  (the で sound is often extended in speech, that's why there's an え on the end. Same as using「~」)


2

Is this sentence correct? Yes, your sentence is perfectly correct. and Is there another meaning that makes sense that I don't know? Yes, there are many meanings of する suru (Wiktionary). Your sentence falls under definition 11. From the link: 11(修飾語 + 体の一部 + をする)その人の特徴として、そのようなものを持つ。 青い目をした少女。 あの子は長い髪をしている。 Translated: 11 ...


7

Those two words do not assume the same roles. 少{すこ}し is an adverb and 少{すく}ない is an i-adjective. So basically, 少し will modify a verb whereas 少ない will tell that there is not much of something. Some examples. 友達{ともだち}が少ない。I don't have a lot of friends. 時間{じかん}が少なくなった。There is not much time left. (lit. Time has become rarer.) ...


4

That なにも is a Guiding Adverb that leads partial negation. It means nothing by itself but functions as a sign that tells that partial negation is following. It's different from normal なに+も ((not) anything) in the point of pitch accent. [なにも{HLL} vs なに{LH}+も{H}] e.g. 何も、急がなくてもいいじゃないか You don't need to hurry, do you? Other examples of Guiding Adverbs are ...


-1

I believe this is the past conditional with -ている. Here are two good resources that will allow you to understand this grammar form and anything similar to it: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/teform http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/conditionals Friendly Ghost described the deconstruction of the meaning very well in his answer. In ...


2

間違っていたら、修正してください。 間違う means "to make a mistake" 間違って is the て form of 間違う 間違っている means "are/is making a mistake" 間違っていた is the た form of 間違っている and means "were/was making a mistake" 間違っていたら means "if I was making a mistake"


1

The phrase that immediately comes to my mind is どのような~~~ + question ending. Based on EDICT: どの: (adj-pn) which, what (way) 様(よう): (n-suf, n) appearance, form, style, design, method, similar to, like どの様: (na-adj) what sort, what kind


2

That's the first character in the well-known Mandarin Chinese greeting "nĭ hăo" (你好). 你 means "you." I don't remember ever seeing it in a Japanese context, and jisho.org returns no words containing it. Edit: tried searching *你, and got one result - 玫瑰玫瑰我愛你, which is a Chinese song from the 1940's which means "Rose, Rose, I love you." *你* also has no ...


5

I think ございます is a 丁寧語(polite form) of ある. Sources: Wiki敬語・三省堂辞書 ~がある / ~があります -> ~がございます ~である / ~です -> ~でございます Examples: 「お忘れ物のございませんようご注意ください。」 「ご不明な点・ご質問等がございましたら、こちらまでお問い合わせください。」 I live in Kansai and I don't think ございます is used more frequently here than in the east (I'm not sure if it's used less, though).


3

This is western Japan dialect which is equivalent to だなあ in standard Japanese. It's a part of Kansai dialect in the broader sense, but I think this のう is not very common in typical Kansai-ben spoken in Osaka. AFAIK It's mainly used in Chugoku/Shioku, which is located further west from Osaka.


2

いきつくところ <- The ultimate state / where it ultimately leads to / the end state もうこの会社にはお金がないが、いきつくところ(Bankruptcy, acquisition etc., whatever the end may be)までいきたい。 〜までだ <- Determination to do something undesirable in order to achieve something (the literal meaning is we merely need to do X) 電車がもうないなら、歩いて帰るまでだ So the literal meaning is I will ...


1

I don't know if the translation is quite appropriate, but it makes sense to me. Then granted, Is the verb 差し込む normally used to talk about the sun shining or is this just fancy poetic writing? Is it shining or thrusting or piercing etc? It goes without saying the sun itself can not come through the narrow gap between the buildings. So, here sure, it ...


4

Yes, ~やつ is antiquated and one would only use it in a joking manner. E.g. こやつが犯人です as a caption for a funny cat pic.


2

When いや is used in the sense of being a casual way to say 'no', yes, it is mostly only used by men. And as Hideki says, 嫌だ meaning disgust or dislike is the other meaning. The reason I'm submitting a separate answer that says the same as his is because of potential difference in dialect. I've been living in Tokyo for several years and I hear women(usually ...


0

I would like to give further information since Mr. Blavius asserts 交代 is for one-time changes, but this is not a hard-set rule. and per choco san's advice. From this site http://知っ得袋.biz/443.html From the site, 交代・・・役目などが一回限りでかわる時 交替・・・かわって行うことが繰り返されるとき Translated 交代 --- one time change of roles or jobs or plays etc etc, 交替 --- ...


2

There are two kinds of いや. One is the one you mentioned. It basically means 'no'. The other is a short form of 嫌{いや}だ. This word expresses a feeling of disgust / dislike. Actually young female speakers use the short form a lot. Male speakers say いやだ and seldom use the short form.


4

They're mostly interchangeable. If you want to be nit-picky, 交替 is for regularly occurring changes, and 交代 is for one-time changes, but this is not a hard-set rule.


2

Yes, なりゃ/なりゃあ is a colloquial contracted form of なれば and なりは: 大人になりゃ理解できる。 どうもなりはしない。 → どうもなりゃしない。 (in case you're not familiar with this pattern, see this) れば or りは can be contracted into りゃ: お金がありゃ、車が買える。(←あれば) お金がなけりゃ、車は買えない。(←なければ) お金なんてありゃしない。(←ありは) やりゃあできる。(←やれば)


2

費用: the money for obtaining something—no matter who pay. Thus you can translate it as "cost". 支出: the money you spend or use—for whatever purpose. I think a better translation is "expenditure". What tax officers find through investigation is 不明な支出. What an hotel charges you for nothing is 不明な費用.


1

I think the difference is exactly as you wrote. 支出 means simply a "pay out" or "expense", whereas 費用 can be used to mean "expense" but also the "cost" or "fee/price" for something. In certain contexts they can be used interchangeably but the meanings are different.


4

I think many people will feel uneasy if they are addressed as 叔母さん/叔父さん by someone older than them, even when they're 叔母/叔父 by definition. This is true especially when your 叔父/叔母 is relatively young. There is no single safe answer for this, but practically, you can just ask your aunt/uncle how to address them, saying something like ...


11

There are obviously no official "rules" regarding the matter as it is something that each family should decide on. In the vast majority of families, howeber, one would not be taught to address one's younger uncle or aunt as 「叔父{おじ}さん」 or 「叔母{おば}さん」, respectively. That would be almost unthinkable. How one would be taught to address them by one's parents ...


-1

Since your updated information is not needed to explain, let me answer without it. (I am sorry to say this, the update only gives me further writings with sorry.) Granted, To me, it seems to transfer a adverb [有名] to a noun, is that so? Could someone help to explain, thx. 有名, mostly and commonly as 有名な as the na-adjective. (But as I commented ...


6

The predicative form of 有名 is 有名だ and its attributive or adjectival form is 有名な. The の particle nominalizes (changes) the preceding adjective into a noun. So 最も有名なのがウーロン茶で is saying that the most famous thing is oolong tea.


4

Basically, yes. To be a bit more strict about "formal", I'd rather say it "objective" (vs "subjective"). That is, we hardly even use のだ when we have informal speech. Another point to notice is about であるのだ. The permissive range would be quite narrow if you're going to end a sentence with it. Because, the overall mood of a sentence is decided by the ...


2

You can also use [自愛]{じ・あい}. ご自愛ください → Please take care of yourself ご自愛を祈ります → (Same) "I'll pray that you..." Using 祈る with a superiour in your company might be a little too familiar, so ください is probably the better choice here. Refer also to this question and this one.


2

気{き}を付{つ}けてください means "please pay attention", or "please take care of yourself", so feel free to use it. And when it comes to your superior, you can add お before 気, and say "お気をつけてください" to show respect. As for "feel better soon" or "get well soon", you can say "お大事に(おだいじに)". I think there is no problem to say it to you superior. And please pay ...


4

The reading for 話 as a counter, according to jisho.org, is わ. The first kanji is read だい, and is a prefix for ordinal numbers. So the whole thing is read だいろくわ and means "sixth episode".


8

Female speakers would certainly use 「素敵{すてき}」 more often than male speakers would, but it is not a female-only word by any means. I, an adult male last time I checked, use the word occasionally to describe persons and objects. I used to use it much more frequently when I was in the fashion retail industry where the vast majority of my customers were ...


5

There are so many ways to render it with a similar effect. Idiolect could play a significant role, reflecting one's generation, gender, personality, proclivity to use humor, etc. The addressee's reaction could depend on HOW you say it, too, e.g., with affected seriousness, with subtle cuteness, a deadpan tone/face, furrowed brows with eyes smiling, etc. ...


2

It has nothing to do with a dialect. 「よっとな」 is just one of the many versions of the shouts (chants?) people use as they make a physical movement of some sort such as lifting up an object, pushing or pulling an object, handing or tossing an object to another person, etc. Similar versions include: あらよっと、そらよっと、こらよっと、はいよっと、よっこらせ, etc. All of these mean "Here ...


0

よっと is a grunt or shout of effort. The addition of な is a variant of the same line. I would translate it as "Huh!" "Like this!" depending on the situation. As far as whether or not it's a Kansai dialect thing, I don't believe so, but I'm no expert in that area so don't quote me there.


2

To simplify a little, 「どいとれっ」 in Western Japan = 「どいてろっ」 in Eastern Japan = 「どいていろ」 in the dictionary form 「退{ど}く」 means "to move out of the way", "to step aside", "to get out", etc. 「どいとれっ」, therefore, means "Step aside (and stay there)!" because it contains 「いる/いろ」 in it. 1) Is there any meaning for the word 「けっ」at the beginning of the sentence? ...


2

おけ is the imperative form for おく. You can ignore the っ at the end as it carries no meaning, only to show an abrupt end of the sentence. The second sentence mean: Oh, hold (his/her) arms and legs tightly !



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