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2

It's 激 for 激しい・非常に and the ギレ comes from 切れる・キレる, so it means "to snap", "to lose one's temper" in an extensive manner. Maybe you could say "to freak out" in terms of anger. Because it's 激, you're good to think of an externally visible behavior.


0

My friend, when teaching Japanese in English, found out about a long verb, "arawaresasewaremashta" in an old book. It means "the river spontaneously appeared", but I'm not sure if it is still used.


3

ス in this case is a colloquial shortening of です. I think the reason people write it with Katakana is that it makes it easier to tell that's a new word rather than んす being a typographical error for something else. If you look for っす you can find entries that explain that this is a [丁寧]{ていねい} colloquialism (http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%A3%E3%81%99). ...


8

I'm Japanese and don't know well about the English idiom "to be out of it." But I think I know some useful Japanese words for your situations.        「頭が働かない」 This expression is natural to say when you have a cold, fever or other bad condition and can't understand or think about things well temporary. "I'm sorry I have a cold so I'm a bit out of it." ...


6

Yes, it means すみっこ. They say it's 静岡{しずおか} dialect. Source 1・Source 2


0

A couple of possible alternatives to @eltonjohn's answers are なぜか, なんとなく, and どういうわけか.


1

最近なんだかぼーっとしてる is excellent. I would say なにやら反応したようだね for "I saw you reacted (to this) somehow". (Actually, どうやら is a better translation for "somehow" alone, but どうやら反応したようだね sounds more of "Looks like you reacted" than "you reacted somehow". 何{なに}やら is an adverb formed by なに + やら. I can't give you the exact grammatical explanation for やら, but it helps to ...


3

警備員 and ガードマン are both common, while the former sounds a bit more formal, and the latter is commonly used in conversations. I don't think ガードマン is less respectful at least in Japanese. 守衛 is not the most common word. Strictly speaking, 警備員 and 守衛 are legally different (see the third question in this page). 警備員 is the official name of a certain profession ...


1

I would say 昨日{きのう}Johnに会{あ}ったかい? for "Did you meet John yesterday?" その筈{はず}だったけど、彼{かれ}にキャンセルされた for "I was supposed to but he cancelled." (彼が中止{ちゅうし}した, if you like non-transliterated words, but this sounds stilted.) 宿題をやらなければならないが、全然やりたくない for "I am supposed to do my homework but I really don't want to."


9

朝鮮 comes from the Joseon dynasty, which is the longest-lasting Korean dynasty, whose rule lasted from the late 14th century all the way to the late 19th century. The use of this name can be chronicled in Chinese records from as early as 100 BC. After the fall of the Joseon dynasty, the Koreans changed their country name to 大韓帝国 "Daehan Jeguk," or the ...


0

Well, I don't feel like talking about international relationships, but... given that "朝鮮" was Japan's colonial name for (all of) Korea It is the assertion by South Korea, but it is groundless. It is true that the word "朝鮮" was (or still is, I dunno) sometimes used in a derogatory way, but the word itself originates back in the early days of the first ...


2

ぼーっとしている. ぼーっと = out of it. している here reveals a 状態 that is continuing. I had originally and mistakenly supposed [没頭]{ぼっとう} which means "immersed in" (similar pronunciation), but a helpful nudge and an image search have corrected me on that point...


0

The first sentence translates to "Copy face up." The second sentence translates to "Send face up."


3

As far as honorific speech is concerned, your own parents are not any higher than yourself in status. You treat them as your equals when speaking to a third party. If you have been taught otherwise somewhere, it is indeed unfortunate. That is why you must say 「[親]{おや}を~~に[連]{つ}れていく」, instead of saying it using a "better" verb that will be introduced below. ...


0

This is my personal opinion after living in Japan for a year. The word 連れる literally means "to lead" or "to take (a person) somewhere". The emphasis here being "to lead" which indicates that you are in charge of where you're going as opposed to showing some one the way or chauffeuring them there. The form 「連れて行く」signifies that you are going along and ...


1

This is a really good question and I think your theory is correct. Let me explain with three scenarios. Situation: You are in the office and Yamamoto-san comes to the office to meet your colleague. Yamamoto-san belongs to another company / or customer 「今から山本様をお連れします / ご案内します」 In the company, Yamamoto-san is in lower-position than your colleague AND in ...


0

In complement to Seijitsu's answer, ‘pescetarian’ is a word you'll want to avoid in general, even at home and especially abroad. It isn't a word many people will recognise and the problem with all these irregular neologisms is that it's impossible to consistently deduce their meaning from their form. So a waiter might indicate he understands, but think you ...


3

In a more broken style (a little bit vulgar), you can also say: 自分にイラついた 自分にムカついた


1

I would say 昨日{きのう}Xをしてしまったので、我{われ}ながら腹{はら}が立{た}った/立{た}つ for "I was/am angry at myself that I did X yesterday." BTW, I think Xして、自分にイライラしちゃったの is a neat translation for "I was annoyed with myself for doing X."


0

I would translate 恋愛ごとと断絶していた as "stayed away from romantic matters." 恋愛ごと can include but not limited to love affairs.


4

You are parsing that part incorrectly. There is no such word 「ごとと」. It should be parsed as: 「[恋愛]{れんあい}ごと + と + 断絶していた」 「恋愛ごと」 means "love-related matters". You will encounter this usage of 「ごと」 quite often. See definition 二-12-㋐ in : https://kotobank.jp/word/%E4%BA%8B-502856#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 「と」 is of ...


4

In your sentence, 「恋愛ごとと」 consists of following parts: 恋愛 + ごと + と And ごと comes from こと(事), which means anything related to the noun before ごと。In this sentence, 「恋愛ごと」 means anything related to love affairs. Another example, 人ごととは思えない (I don't think it's an affair of other people), 人ごと is often written as 他人事 私事(わたくしごと) personal matter, personal ...


1

There are plenty of web-based resources to use in case you want to find the meaning/translation. As being stated in comments, jisho is a great tool to do fulfill your needs in Japanese language. You can search for the sentence directly, and then go through each word to understand the whole meaning. Not to mention, you can distinguish the word that you are ...


-1

From WWWJDIC, そんな風【ふう】に (exp) in that manner; like that; KD The translation for that sentence is (roughly) People who laugh off that way should die. The character 風 has multiple meanings. From Wiktionary, a movement of air; a wind airs style It's usually used as a suffix after a noun (e.g. country). Example from JGram (with ...


5

I'm a lacto-ovo-pescatarian who eats fish but not other seafood, who is living in Japan. The most bewildering thing about your question for the Japanese server is that most Japanese do not consider seafood to be meat. The other confusing part is that they don't generally think in terms of a dish being vegetarian or not (the majority of vegetable dishes in ...


6

Maybe you can try to ask whether the dish contains meat and say that you do not eat meat... something like this : [肉]{にく}は[入]{はい}っていますか? 肉は[食]{た}べないんですが。。。 Is there any meat inside ? I do not eat meat. I guess with this kind of sentence, they will understand that you want something without meat and they may advise you something else if you order ...


3

I can't think of a succinct word to express the idea of pescetarianism in Japanese. This may sound ironical, considering that the Japanese had been pescetarian before Meiji era. That said, I would explain in layman's word like [私]{わたし}は、[肉類]{にくるい}が[苦手]{にがて}なのですが、これは[魚介類]{ぎょかいるい}[主体]{しゅたい}の[料理]{りょうり}ですか? This expression may sound stilted, but it ...


3

間すらない is 間 + すら + ない, where すら is a particle usually translating to "even", so 声をかける間すらない means "hadn't even time to say anything".


3

Its official translation, SpotPass, doesn't help understand いつの間に通信. But Wikipedia says its literal translation is Unnoticed Communication. いつの間に means 'unnoticed', or 'before one notices it's happening'. いつの間にか夏が終わってしまった。 The summer had gone before I knew / all too soon. いつの間に in いつの間に通信 implies the connection is done silently, before you are aware ...


1

I would say 「彼に散髪{さんぱつ}しようと提案{ていあん}したが断{ことわ}られた」for "I offered him a haircut but he refused." 「彼にビールを一杯{いっぱい}勧{すす}めた」for "I offered him a beer." 「車に同乗{どうじょう}するよう彼を誘{さそ}った」for "I offered him a ride." Note that the above is just one of many possibilities. the correct usage of the following I am not sure if I can offer (no pun intended) you "correct ...


7

しとったんや means しておったのだ → していたのだ, "was doing", in colloquial Kansai-ben.


2

Kansai : Kanto しとったんや : して(い)たんだ


3

My real question here would be: "Would that gentleman have referred to you as 「あなた」 if you were a Japanese girl of your age?" If that is how he usually refers to others, then that is just his speech style. Whether that is common or not is not his concern. In all of my life as a Japanese-speaker living in Japan since birth, I honestly have yet to encounter ...


5

Roughly, 「やで」 is the Kansai equivalent of the Kanto 「だよ」. It is an affirmation sentence-ender. 「しとるんやで」≒「してるんだよ」


3

どゆこと is a shortening of どういうこと. 言う is often pronounced ゆう and the ゆ appears in all sorts of inflections of いう, like ゆえない for いえない or ゆって for いって etc. TV subtitles often use spellings that are supposed to reflect words as they might be spoken, like どゆこと or やってます for やっています or やだ for いやだ. In the case of どゆこと it conveys maybe a little extra surprise, because ...


3

There are a lot of metaphors in common around the world. This is a good example of one such metaphor - the extension is quite logical (give help > give a hand (to help) > lend a hand), and it wouldn't surprise me to find many more examples of similar metaphors around the world. There are others that are less common, such as Japanese's 猫をかぶる - the idea of ...


3

Ote(おて) You show your hand to your dog and say "ote", and the dog our your paw on your hand. I'm not sure the command is common in America, so if you are not sure what is ote, you can watch this video. Osuwari(おすわり) is also common, which is equivalent to sit. Fuse(ふせ) is a command for a dog to duck/get down. You can watch this video to have idea of fuse. ...


2

I am not a linguist, so I may be wrong, but... 損害 and 被害 both mean "damage", "loss." But 被害 is something caused by somebody else or something that is beyond control, while 損害 includes damage and loss caused by oneself or something under one's control. Example: 地震による被害   damage caused by the earthquake 株取引による損害  loss generated in stock trading You can ...


0

名前 is just "name", and sometimes お名前 is used in polite conversation, but 名 would not be used in conversation. In literature you might see it like 彼の名は~~ but it sounds good only in a story context, not conversation unless you intend to sound like you are narrating something in a joking manner. In school, when we would go to the teacher's room, sometimes ...


5

~せい marks the reason for something, basically means "Because of ..." その means "that" Combining these the whole sentence means: Ending up on the rooftop was because of that too.


5

どうもごめいわくおかけしやして・・・ = どうもご[迷惑]{めいわく}(を)おかけしまして・・・ ~しやして(しやす) means ~しまして(します) in regional (probably Edo / 江戸っ子言葉) accent. おか(掛)けします/おかけしました is the humble form of かけます/かけました. 「申し訳ありません(でした)」 or 「すみません(でした)」 is being left out after the おかけしやして・・・. どうもご迷惑をおかけしまして、(すみませんでした。) (I am sorry that) I (or, in this context, "he" = 矢吹丈) caused trouble / ...


4

It's the passive of たたっこむ, which is an elided form of 叩き込む, which here figuratively means 'to throw someone in prison'. Thus a translation might be: That bastard Joe, could it be that he's going to end up getting thrown in prison?


2

First of all, yes it is perfectly fine to say おかえりなさい to a colleague coming back from somewhere. Second, a female colleague saying おかえりなさいませ is likely kidding by imitating the overly elaborate manner of speaking in Maid cafes or such, which makes him laugh. However, another possibility is the female colleague simply being very polite.


-1

I'm pretty sure you must mean B: どうもごめいわくおかけしゃして... This expression comes from ”~てしまっています。”, in colloquial form. When used in polite form: ご迷惑をおかけしてしまって、申し訳ございません。 This is basically in inflection from おかけします。 In this case B: どうもごめいわくおかけしゃして... It's a conversational shortcut. Hope I'm making sense.


5

I often hear it referred to as [ムービー]{LHHH} (rather than [ムービー]{HLLL}), although I hear カットシーン is equally common.


1

きっとその魅力がわかていただけるかと思います It is きっとその魅力がわかっていただけるかと思います which is a potential form of "いただく". Hope this helps.


1

Particularly in film or video games, カットシーン is widely used.


3

A Japanese thesaurus has an entry. In short, 信用 means that you believe them not to lie to you, and 信頼 that you trust them to work as you expected. These are often but other aspects of the same matter, but for example, a clever lawyer might be 信用できないが信頼できる to the client, and your nice but incompetent friend is 信用できるが信頼できない to you. Unfortunately, Google ...


6

より means "from" (similar to から). うけ(受け) is the 連用形 form of 受ける, "to receive", "to be given", etc.


6

In this particular case, たまらん is his nickname. たま comes from his surname 玉木(たまき), and らん is "run" which comes from his given name 走太(そうた). Of course, it's a pun for 堪らん = 堪らない.



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