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12

「のたのたする」 is a colloquial expression meaning "to wander around idly", "to act in a highly unproductive manner", etc. "What the heck! A big guy drinking like a fish and wandering around idly under the broad daylight!"


11

I would say that it is only a lisping pronunciation of 「たすけて」 = "Help!" I would not call it dialectal unless this character says other words or phrases that are clearly dialectal.


10

In some dialects spoken in the western part of Japan, you can elongate the last vowel of the masu-form to make an imperative form: 歩きい。 (dialect) = 歩け。 Walk. 見い。 (dialect) = 見ろ。 Watch. [待ちい]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [待て]{HL}。 Wait. [食べえ]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [食べろ]{LHL}。 Eat. (From my personal experience, I feel this is mainly used in Chugoku/Shikoku ...


10

"What is 学校" is not an easy question; there are many definitions of it. but here's the summary: Legally speaking, "the narrow definition" of 学校 (aka 一条校), as defined in the first clause of the law called 学校教育法, includes public and private 小学校, 中学校, 高校, 大学, and so on. And it also does include kindergartens (!) but does not include so-called 大学校. Broader ...


7

The target of 報復 is usually marked with に or へ. I also think this sentence should be 適当なぬいぐるみに報復したくなった, at least. And I don't get why 報復 is used here in the first place, because you can't have a grudge against a random (適当な) stuffed animal you didn't know. This kind of action is normally called 八つ当たり. EDIT: BCCWJ corpus has one example of ~を報復(する) and 15 ...


7

"のたのたする" is a colloquial expression of "[無為]{むい}に過ごす / [怠惰]{たいだ}に過ごす" meaning "to idle one's time away" as well as "のらくらする." のたのた、のらくら、のろのろ, all are a sort of onomatopoeic expression depicting laziness, inactiveness and slowness. We use ”のたのた” and "のたのたする" in such a way as: この忙しい時にのたのたしてるんじゃねえよ - Don't be idle in such a busy time. ...


5

Exactly the same as other words. The thing about 擬音語{ぎおんご} and 擬態語{ぎたいご} (strictly speaking "onomatopoeia" only describes 擬音語, though it's commonly used for both) is that to Japanese speakers, they're just words like any other. How did you learn helter-skelter, mishmash, or bang? In other words, how people learn language, and why they agree on the more or ...


5

Repeating 心配{しんぱい} twice (心配で心配で) is just a way to emphasize that he is really worried. I guess you could say this in English, "While he is away, I am just so terribly worried." 「[離]{はな}れている[間]{あいだ}心配で心配で」 It is often used in conjunction with 「たまらない」 eg, It is formed like this: Adjective (「て」, 「で」 form) followed by 「たまらない」 心配で心配でたまらない unbearably ...


5

「いうないっ」 is a form of negative imperative, the dictionary form of which would be 「いうな」. It sounds masculine and very informal. You could call 「いうないっ」 dialectal because it is not used all over Japan. You will hear it around Tokyo for sure, but not really in Western Japan to my knowledge. We certainly do not say it around Nagoya, which is right in the ...


5

よれ (wrinkle) is a different verb to よれん. よれん is from よらない which is the negative of よる (寄る come near). おおっ くせえのう… おらあぶた小屋だけはマスクなしではそばにもよれんわい。 Oh, so smelly... Pig house is the only place I can't go near without a mask.


5

Well, your reaction is not that wrong actually. You just need to think about the context in which the sentence is being asked. いい means indeed good and here the topic of the sentence are the drinks, marked by the particle は. So, a very literal translation could be: "talking about drinks, what is good?". This construction with なにがいいですか is often used to ...


5

Here is what the Dictionary of Iconic Expressions says, on pages 833-834: nota-nota M: The manner of moving slowly and heavily. nota-nota (to) (1) お腹がふくれてくると、普通だったらマタニティドレスにペタ靴で、お腹をつき出してノタノタ歩きますけれど […]。 Onaka ga fukurete-kuru to, futsuu da'tara mataniti:-doresu ni peta-gutsu de, onaka o tsuki-dashite nota-nota aruki-masu keredo [...]. When one's belly ...


5

When I see 歓喜の声を上げる, I have something "explosive" in mind, like this: On the other hand, when I see 喜悦の声を上げる in non-religious contexts, what I would have in mind is the voice of sensual pleasure, induced by things like drugs or orgasm. According to BCCWJ, 喜悦 is rarer and much more literary than 歓喜. 歓喜 frequently appears in light novels and casual blog ...


4

「尋ねられもしないこと」 means "something that is not even asked." Breakdown: 尋ねられ -- verb 尋ねる + passive られる も -- binding particle (係助詞) "even" しない -- verb する + negative ない こと -- noun (事) "thing, something" 「the continuative form (連用形) of a verb + もしない」 means "don't even do~~", eg: 「知りもしない」 「見もしない」 尋ねられもしないことをこちらからわざわざ連絡するつもりはない。 literally means "We have no ...


4

in this case, 助けて【たすけて:tasukete】is right. (means "help me.")


4

This is a partial answer only, but children's books. Books targeting kinder and first-grade kids tend to have a very specific style ~ they are generally hiragana only, use a lot of "kid speak" and informal Japanese, and they are very heavy on mimetic/onomatopoeic words.


4

「~~とくら」 is a colloquial and masculine Tokyo way of pronouncing 「~~と + くる + わ」. The contraction just so quintessentially sounds Tokyo. (Unlike what so many J-learners seem to firmly believe, this 「わ」 is not a feminine sentence-ender.) I am going to call this 「と」 quotative just because there is no other explanation that seems feasible in my brain. 「~~とくら」,...


3

No. I suppose it's a bit like you guys. It serves to make it clear there are multiple children.


3

Japanese don't pronounce 円 as "Yen" like "i-en." We pronounce it clearly "えん," though I don't know how to describe Japanese "え" sound by using alphabet and phonetic sybols. As a side story, I have a memory of having read an episode in some book that 伊藤博文 - Ito Hirobumi, the Japan's first Prime Minister proposed to use the denomination of 円 for Japan's ...


3

I think わんわん・ヒヒーン・にゃー and so on are just animal sounds like you would have in any language and like WeirdlyCheezy says probably come from children's books. But... うろうろ could be a doubling of the two syllable noun うろ meaning "empty" with a dash of the word 迂路 meaning "detour" ねばねば is a doubling of the root of the verb ねばる meaning "to stick to" ...


3

I think your guess about 這う is correct, except it causative form which means "to make crawl". Normally that is 這わせて, however it seems that in some dialects せ can change to し, so you end up with はわして. Here is one thread which discuses saying 見して instead of 見せて. The overall tone of this line is pretty harsh, and sounds like it was said by a pretty scary guy....


3

Pretty simple transformation into standard Japanese; you were on the right track: 待ちなさい、あなたたち。


3

活動 is a habitual activity, eg hobby, routine, club activities, or even limited-time sustained effort (eg 就職活動 = job hunt) 行動 is a more generic one-shot behavior or action 仕草 is more about the way you carry yourself, mannerisms, motions, etc. 作用 ~ not much experience with this one, but I believe it is a process, eg a scientific or biological process.


3

You are correct with "What beverages are good?" in terms of word-for-word translation. However, いい (ii) and いいですか (ii desu ka) have different meanings. いい (ii) = good ~いいですか (ii desu ka) = Can I ~ , May I ~ (if you use the polity form), would you like ~, are you okay with ~ If we directly translate "What do you like to drink?", it will become "...


3

So-called 擬{ぎ}態{たい}語{ご} like ギラギラ, クルクル are often referred to in English as mimetic words, mimesis, or mimetics. These identifiers seem to be more popular than ideophones on this site. See the search results: "mimetic" vs "ideophone". Strictly speaking, these words have a broader sense, and seem to include onomatopoeic words like ニャア, ピーポー. The Wikipedia ...


3

I apologize for the errors. The ending is actually part of an old auxiliary ます, which is, I may say, its remnant. As the linked Kotobank page says, まする is an old ending / attributive form of 丁寧語{ていねいご}-ます-. Kotobank also says as follows: [補説]現代語では、仮定形「ますれ」とともにその使用は限られ、形式ばった堅苦しい表現に用いられるだけである。 Translation: [Additional Information]Today, together ...


2

The kanji for かれ is 彼(れ). かれ is an old form of あれ, meaning "that one" (as you probably know). 彼 can also be used in [彼]{あ}の (again, "that one [specific thing]"). Somehow -- and I'm not sure how etymologically -- 彼れ became 彼, which became shorthand for 彼の男: that man The kanji for 彼女 is then basically [彼]{あ}の[女]{おんな}: that woman (again, with the かの being ...


2

It is hard to be 100% sure without context, but this も is probably an inclusive も, as in "also". So something like "The school teacher is also very kind". But you need to be careful with this translation because the "also" applies to the teacher, not to kindness. For example: "Bob is kind. Alice is also very kind." ボブは優しいです。アリスもとても優しいです。 [Also note how ...


2

Japanese language doesn't have plural form of noun like English. So we can't know how many children are playing in the park in this sentence "子供が公園で遊んでいます". If you want to say "A child is playing in the park", you say "一人の子供が公園で遊んでいます。" If you want to say "Children are playing in the park", you say "子供たちが公園で遊んでいます。".


2

This 涯 is read as はて, and is a rare alternative kanji of 果【は】て (meaning "End" as in "World's End") Source: 青空文庫 桜の森の満開の下 坂口安吾 According to this question, 広辞苑 seems to list this as the possible reading of 涯.



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