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8

Both means today, but the meaning depends on the pronunciation. きょう refers to the day after yesterday, the day before tomorrow. 今日【きょう】は雨【あめ】が降【ふ】っています。 It's raining today. こんにち means present age, nowadays, or these days. 今日【こんにち】の若者【わかもの】は新聞【しんぶん】を読【よ】まない。 Young people of today do not read newspapers. This difference is rather strict; ...


6

I see little difference in the level of formality. もうすぐ may be, relatively, a bit more casual or colloquial than そろそろ, but, I can't say that そろそろ is a formal or stiff word in general. Only そろそろ has the meaning of "expected time", "high time", "it's about time". You can just say 「そろそろ…。」 when you want to leave now, to interrupt a boring discussion, or to ...


6

First, every language has peculiar vocabulary when it comes to memorials, ceremonies, gravestones, etc. Don't believe Google Translate in such a case. Second, Japanese people generally don't like engraving Japanese text on things like rings, bracelets, watches, etc. Sharing such items as the symbol of love or friendship is a common practice in Japan, but ...


6

I think it might refer to [加盟]{かめい}する, although in the context of leaving early or not from work, 参加する would have been a much better fit. Still, my guess is the author just asked someone "How do you say participation in Japanese?" and someone came up with 加盟する.


6

具合【ぐあい】 - Health / condition. It's worth noting that this doesn't apply exclusively to people, though! 「エンジンの具合を調【しら】べる」 ("Check the condition of the engine.") 「具合が悪【わる】いので休【やす】む」 ("I'm not feeling to good today so I'm gonna rest.") 気分【きぶん】 - Mood. 「仕事【しごと】をする気分になれない」 ("I can't get into the mood to do work.") 「今日【きょう】は気分がのらない」 ("I'm not in the mood ...


6

There is 「こと」 that actually means "thing(s)" and there is 「こと」 that does not mean "thing(s)". 「ふたつのことをかんがえています。」 means "I am thinking of two things." The こと clearely means "thing". In the following sentence, however, こと does not really mean that. 「すみこさんのことがすきです。」 = "I like/love Sumiko." One could possibly translate it as "I like the things ...


5

Who wrote this textbook? The word it should have used is 「異存」, not 「依存」. Both are pronounced いぞん but only 異存 will fit in the context. 「異存」 means "objection". 「異存はない」 = "to have no objection" 


4

区別 and 差別 both carry a mean of "discrimination" but have distinct meanings in Japanese. 区別 is for putting things in different categories or domains, i.e. the ability to distinguish. For instance, the phrase [善悪]{ぜんあく}の区別 = to discriminate between good and evil. 差別 often means discrimination in the pejorative, i.e. to place a [差]{さ}, here meaning ...


4

The most normal word choice for "to ask for" is [頼]{たの}む. 仰{あお}ぐ means "to ask for" only in the sense of seeking guidance from someone above you -- not in the sense of asking for a raise.


4

If you are familiar with the general difference between on-readings (音読み) and kun-readings (訓読み), you already know the basic difference between 形【かたち】 (kun) and 形状【けいじょう】 (on). 形 is used in informal conversations/writings and most of formal conversations, while 形状 is preferred in formal written texts or scientific articles. Usually Japanese children learn ...


3

When I was barely talking Japanese riding taxi was one of the easiest tasks. The basic algorithm is as follows: Immediately after getting into taxi tell //some landmark next to your place// までお願いします。Taxi drivers know all landmarks around and rarely ask for directions to there. If a driver asks which way is preferred, it is easier to just answer 速い方 - ...


3

It appears as if we might be dealing with a garbled 任【まか】せる, 'to entrust'. Basically, the word kameseru is only found in two contexts: The article in question and excerpts plagiarized from it; and questions asking what the word kameseru means such as a similar discussion on reddit.


3

こと is an abstract thing. In English when you say something like "I don't know much about XX." or "I know a bit about XX." The about XX part is XXのこと. 


3

The closest word to kameseru which means "participation" is, maybe 噛【か】ませる? 噛む sometimes means "get (partially) involved", often (but not necessarily) referring to bad/illegal things. My boss may say something like this: やれる仕事はないかもしれないけどさ、とりあえずA君もこのプロジェクトに噛ませといてよ。 Though I doubt he has something to do, let A join this project for now, too. Well, ...


1

I'm the author of that post, the 'insufferable self-absorbed hipster.' It was a typo - I'd meant 'kamei-suru' but was pretty bad at Japanese when I first arrived (and still am not very good, but continue to learn and practice even after having left the country). It's this: 加盟 + する And basically refers to 'becoming a part of the group' by engaging and ...



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