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10

It is most likely a coding mistake. When products are internationalized, strings in the code are changed depending on the locale of the user. In this case, their template is something like "%s\u00AE:" where %s is the localized string. \u00AE is ®. They obviously haven't filed a trademark on 体感温度, but rather some formula they use that is different from ...


8

For the most part さようなら is only really the word to use when you do not expect to see somebody again for a long time, or indeed ever. The word has this in common with the English word "Goodbye", except goodbye has drifted from its original meaning to the point where it's appropriate -- if sometimes a little formal -- in any type of parting. Japanese has a ...


7

You can use either 「[近]{ちか}い」 or 「近く」, but each requires a different sentence structure. 「A + は + B + に + 近いです。」 「A + は + B + から + 近いです。」 「A + は + B + の + 近く + に + あります。」 The particle choices are very important in these short phrases.


6

How children address their mothers totally depends on the family. Common ones are: おかあさん、ママ、おふくろ、おかあちゃん、かあちゃん, etc. It is not formal at all to use おかあさん. In fact, it is so common that I had to place it at the top of the list above. Uncommon ones include: [母上]{ははうえ}、お[母様]{かあさま}, etc. In real life, I have only met one person who addressed her parents 母上 ...


6

I agree with James' answer. Additionally, Childrens might use さようなら more than adults, because they often hear that words in classrooms. In very formal contexts like at bussiness, 失礼します is often used. (This phrase is also used when you entering rooms like a president's office or a staff room) ...


5

What I've heard about "さようなら", is that it is actually still used nowadays. But, as colleagues mentioned before, there should be more time to pass till you will see each other again. At the end of work, colleagues,who working together, say to each other "お疲れさまでした"(or other forms of the same phrase depending on the level of politeness). Which actually means ...


5

Sumimasen, watashi wa nihongo wo sukoshi dake zonjite orimasu. The problem of this sentence is that it's unclear you want to say this positively or negatively. People will expect something negative after Sumimasen, just like English "I'm afraid..." If you want to say this positively, like "(Yes,) I speak Japanese a little." Don't add Sumimasen: ...


4

Are you sure they aren't the other way round? I have only ever known 東 as either ひがし on it's own 東{ひがし} or とう when used in a compound 東京{とうきょう}. The reading あずま seems like in comes from the period where the region encompassing Kyoto and Nara were the political and cultural capitals of Japan as it basically means Tokyo from the Perspective of Kyoto. My ...


4

Uh, I think you have it backwards? ひがし is the ordinary word for "east" in modern Japanese. あずま is archaic, and I'm pretty sure people would look at you weird if you used it. There are, however, some compounds in which あずま is fossilized. The only one I was aware of before looking things up was 東夷【あずま.えびす】 "Eastern barbarians"; there also appear to be ...


4

If you want to talk to your mother in Japanese, call her おかあさん. This is like calling your mother "mother". Small kids sometimes call their mother ママ ("mommy"), but since you're probably older than 10, you should stick to おかあさん. (And no, it's not too formal. Anime Japanese is not really known for being too formal...) There are cutefied or colloquial variants ...


4

Japanese motion verbs utilize the particle を for both object and place the action takes place. So you can equally say: 彼を取り囲む。 周囲を取り囲む。 彼の周囲を取り囲む。 but not: × 彼を周囲を取り囲む。 (same case particle cannot be repeated in one clause) In my opinion, the 周囲を取り囲む version has slightly more "completely surrounded" nuance, but it barely matters in the usual ...


3

のに introduce some disappointment. The room's owner would say the second sentence but never the first. The second sentence is just an observation. The のに includes a soft 'Why isn't it clean as always ?'


3

I think the difference can be summarized by the glosses 「〜かかわらず」⇒ "regardless of ~" 「〜かまわず」⇒"without minding ~" I guess they are somewhat similar, but using one instead of the other does result in a different meaning in every sentence I can think of. Here's an example where 「〜かかわらず」 doesn't work: 私に構わず行ってください。 "Don't mind me and go ahead." ...


3

〜かまわず is the 〜ず negative form of [構]{かま}う, meaning to "care about/mind/pay attention to". It has an emotional/personal sense to it to. 鉛筆で書いても構いませんか1 → May I write with a/in pencil? ("Do you not care if I write in pencil?") 彼は身なりのことはかまわない2 → He doesn't care about his appearance. 〜かかわらず is the 〜ず negative form of かかわる, meaning "have to do ...


3

「オシ」 comes from the verb 「[推]{お}す」, which means "to recommend". You may already know the word 「[推薦]{すいせん}する」, which means the same. Notice the same kanji is used in both. 「イチ」, of course, means 「[一番]{いちばん}」. Thus, 「イチオシ」 is a colloquial (kind of slangy but not too much) word meaning "one's best recommendation". Finally, 「チョク」 in 「レコチョク」 is 「[直]{ちょく}」 in ...


3

箇所{かしょ} (or 個所) is a physical "point" you can point where it is (that is, on the paper or elsewhere). You can translate it as "place", "spot" or "site". 点{てん}, by contrast, indicates abstract "point" you can only name in your mind (unless it means literal "dot"). Possible translations are "respect", "regard" or "aspect". ○ 論旨{ろんし}に筋{すじ}の通{とお}らない点がある。 ...


3

"Flyers" > "Leaflets" The word would most often refer to the (advertising) flyers that are inserted in newspapers. In Japan, many flyers are also thrown into your mailbox (without your permission). It is 「チラシ」, not 「チラツ」. It is the シ in サシスセソ, not the ツ in タチツテト. Finally, forget the kanji some people mentioned in the comments above for now. To refer ...


2

The original difference between 水 and お湯 is that the latter was prepared, but the former was never. Hence, the honorific お is an indicator that this has been done for the listener's well being. Using temperature as a divider is for simplicity's sake.


2

My answer is (basically) the same as kiss-o-matic. I would have never thought about why we call our mothers おふくろ if you didn't ask us. I am going to translate (http://gogen-allguide.com/o/ofukuro.html) ( I can not copy the original Japanese due to the copyright ): The word has been seen since Muromachi era, and there are several theories about the ...


1

The both are almost identical actually, but I feel a slight sensation of regret from the のに version. So, you may be right. When a person says この部屋はいつもきれいなのに, s/he is perhaps picturing the tidy room it used to be in his/her mind, from which a tinge of disappointment rises at the sight of the mess of actual room. On the other hand, the けど version seems to ...


1

Ah, sorry, I read your post mistakingly. We do not call eastward 東(あずま), completely an old word, thus we call eastward as 東(ひがし) FYI please refer to the origin of あずま ( I mistakingly wrote the below first, sorry ) I think the question is answered here. ( No UPVOTE NEEDED, Downote is OK ) ...


1

Did you mean チラシ? If so, this is just 散らし written in katakana.


1

The kanji for it is 袋 (Bag - ironically) so I'd say no. According to the link below, the word is derived from: Bags being used to manage valuables... like a mother would. The bag in the uterus (placenta?)... [TMI me thinks] When a mother hugs a child tightly, the [futokoro: area around the chest] becomes like a bag. Side Note: Interested to ...



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