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9

Quick answer: ずっと - sustained over long period of time いつも - every time, all the time, etc. Examples: ずっと東京に住んでいます。 (I've lived in Tokyo for a long time.) 東京に出張するときは、いつも「帝国ホテル」に泊まっています。 (I always stay at the Imperial Hotel when I have a business trip to Tokyo.) Hope that helps!


9

証【あかし】: An object (mainly tangible) that symbolizes/proves the existence of something (often intangible, such as love, safety and friendship). Dictionaries just say 証【あかし】 is 証拠, but I feel this word is somewhat closer to "symbol" in modern Japanese. This is a bit literary expression, and is not frequently seen in scientific contexts. 証拠【しょうこ】: An object or ...


7

絶叫する can be used with anything; you are scared, sad, surprised, angry (possibly less common with angry), whereas 怒鳴る always means you are angry.


7

[当]{あ}たり[前]{まえ} means 'obvious' - something is exactly the way everyone ought to expect it to be, and it's quite surprising that you're expecting it to be something else. It can mean 'ordinary' in the right contexts - effectively the above, just minus the surprise at your expectations. [相変わらず]{あいかわらず} means 'same as ever' - something remains the way it's ...


7

I think it's [御朱印帳]{ごしゅいんちょう}.


7

Today we never say 米国人 in everyday speech and even in written form most people express American as アメリカ人. The obvious exception is a newspaper. Writers there still express it as 米国人, for possibly two reasons: 米国 is shorter than アメリカ. Kanji is more suited than Katakana to vertical writing, which is still used in newspapers. I also want to note that this ...


6

急に is like suddenly I think, this word includes the meanings of without notice or unexpected. すぐに is immediately, as you mentioned. The context describes the baby's general habit, so must be expected things. the answer is 3.すぐに.


6

I think there is almost no difference in their meanings, and the two phrases are almost always interchangeable. I said almost because I can not think of even a single counter example in a few minutes as a native speaker. By the way, you can also use a verb, '計画する', without 'を' in a similar way. For example, 旅行の計画を立てる。 旅行の計画をする。 are similar to ...


5

意志{いし} It's just the will or desire of doing anything. やろうとする気持{きも}ち。 今週中{こんしゅうちゅう}にそのプロジェクトをやり遂げるという意志がある。 志{こころざし} Including the meaning of 意志{いし}, it's the determination or resolution to carry out a higher, long term goal or objective. It's not just the will, but the ambition, aspiration and resolve to do something. ...


5

As a Christian who worked at a Christian church in Japan for two years, I can say this would definitely be translated with 与える; more specifically, 与えてくださる. The whole sentence would be something like 主よ、日々の祝福、そしてまた、十字架の[御業]{み・わざ}によってイエスキリストを通して永遠の命を与えてくださり、(本当に)感謝します。


5

There's honestly nothing wrong with beginning the call with "こんばんは" as it would add a touch of your personality. It would be equivalent to saying "Good evening, I'd like to order a pizza", which sounds nice and isn't too overly polite. If you want to say the same typical phrase as other Japanese, you could use: "すみません、注文{ちゅうもん}お願い{おねがい}したいのですが。" Whether ...


5

Greetings like こんばんは sounds unnecessary. Some people may begin with すみません, though I don't think it necessary either. I would say はい、注文をお願いします, just like you in English!


4

I think it's "quite" emotionally loaded, or at least can be. My son often refers to it when he wants to see his mom (and it's generally met w/ tears). He's a bit of a mama's boy. On the flip side though, throw a な~ at the end of it, and now it's definitely softened. I think for the most part it has to do with the tone of the way it's conveyed, but to a ...


4

Honestly, I have almost always heard people from the United States use "アメリカ人". I think "米国" can indeed be thought as more formal, and is used a lot when it comes to guidebooks and such. I see it a lot in writing, and when writing compounds: 米文学{べいぶんがく}: American literature. Any other form, 米国 or アメリカ, can be used there. 北米{ほくべい}: North America 米州{べいしゅう}: ...


4

To add to the other answer, I was taught that 〜なくて can imply a a causal relationship, while 〜ないで doesn't. 電車に乗れなくて、遅刻した。 - I was late because I couldn't get on the train. シャワーを浴びないで、家を出た。 - I left the house without taking a shower. (but not because) In these examples, the two are not interchangeable as far as I know. Also, as the other answer ...


3

These words or phrase are so similar that even a native Japanese speaker could confuse their meanings. However, there are a few differences between these words: 妥協 "compromise" Usually, 妥協 is based on a unilateral view from a person or group and suggests some kind of dissatisfaction. 私はその契約には納得いかなかったが、予算から考えて妥協せざるを得なかった。 歩み寄り "compromise" This ...


3

〜し〜し is a common pattern for listing things. Although the pattern strictly speaking requires at least two list items, in colloquial speech it often occurs by itself. Here, the previous discussion probably contains some things which are good about ジャンボ and the fact that he works for two is just another good thing about him. Related questions: (1) Are there ...


2

There are no one-to-one translations here. It really depends on who is talking to who and the context of the conversation. I believe after all in these two sentences are similar, but they take slightly different meaning. The first sentence implies that they were aware of some indications or expectations of snowing. Maybe they had a chat about whether it is ...


2

I think for this "after all", your best choice is だって. You should wear a jacket. After all, it's snowing out there. ジャケット着たほうがいいよ。だって、雪が降っているからね。 Of course I bought you a present! It's our anniversary after all. もちろんプレゼント買ってあるよ。だって、俺たちの記念日じゃん。 If you want a formal sentence, I think you should have different example sentences. Especially the ...


2

“しな” = 接続助詞 “し” + 終助詞 “な” “Aするしな。” implies something happens because of A. Your example implies “Because ジャンボ works instead of someone (father?), he doesn’t have to work.”


2

獣 is always read けもの or けだもの in modern Japanese. けもの Simply refers to any kind of beast or animal. けだもの It's only used for emotionally deprived, unscrupulous, monstrous individuals, like a murderer, rapist or barbarian. It always refers to the actual perpetrator, so for example, you wouldn't call Adolf Hitler a けだもの. Think of Chucky from Child's ...


2

The examples in my J-E dictionary only use 秘める to hide something "within". IE, something intangible. The spirit within... etc. They actually use it for something like treasure, but again, this is on a far grander scale, and aren't necessarily related to something physical. You'll also not hear of someone using it in the every day sense, as with 隠す, which ...


2

I see almost no difference between the two. I googled and found a handful of articles and questions about this topic, written by native Japanese people. But none of the explanations was convincing enough, at least to me. Both tend to refer to the ability of solving practical problems, not just the ability to memorize something and get high marks on written ...


2

整える should be most suitable. However, just saying 'please put my hair in order' might be a little ambiguous. I'm sure your barber would ask for more details and you would get your desired haircut. But to be sure you might want to mention that you want to keep the length the same. Therefore you could say: 長{なが}さをそのままで、全体的{ぜんたいてき}に整えてください。 Which pretty much ...


2

There are several ways of saying the same thing: 熱が下がらず苦しかった。 - literary or stiff expression 熱が下がらなくて苦しかった。 - casual / conversational. 熱が下がらないので苦しかった。 - using explicit ので "because". I think ~ないで is used mostly for: ① negative imperative: "さわらないで!" (milder than さわるな!) ② in the form of ~ないでいる and ~ないでおく: "今は言わないでおこう" ③ before various verbs: ...


2

To use the dictionary, you need to de-inflect them. Both are given in past tense in the problem but you need them in the present "dictionary"-form to look them up: [通]{とお}した is the past tense of [通]{とお}す [通]{つう}じた is the past tense of [通]{つう}じる 通す -> to persist, to make way for 通じる -> best definition = to convey or communicate Given these definitions, ...


2

I think what you have learned is absolutely correct: these are words with similar meanings, and you should not be confused. There are lots of words (in all languages) with very similar meanings, and often the only way to understand which is most appropriate in a particular case is from experience of hearing them used. So it's quite hopeless trying to learn ...


1

The word is nar-an, a negated form of the verb なる. The standard negation of the verb may be known to you as ならない. The utterance you ask about can be rephrased as 早く日曜日にならないかな.


1

For 保つ the nuance I think is "to hold on to X, or to withhold the X". It is easy to see that if you fail in doing so, the situation will completely change. 正気を保つ (to mantain/keep one's sanity, possibly in the face of a situation which might make you literally insane) 平静心を保つ (to keep your calm) 平和を保つ refers to making effort to keep the peace. ...


1

妥協 is used when both or either of two people/groups/countries give over opinions/ideas to seek out common ground with no conflict. 歩み寄り is used when both of two people/groups/countries try to reach happy middle ground. 折衷 means putting all the good points of different opinions/ideas together. 和解 means reconciliation. 譲歩 is used when the doer gives over ...



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