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9

朝鮮 comes from the Joseon dynasty, which is the longest-lasting Korean dynasty, whose rule lasted from the late 14th century all the way to the late 19th century. The use of this name can be chronicled in Chinese records from as early as 100 BC. After the fall of the Joseon dynasty, the Koreans changed their country name to 大韓帝国 "Daehan Jeguk," or the ...


8

I'm Japanese and don't know well about the English idiom "to be out of it." But I think I know some useful Japanese words for your situations.        「頭が働かない」 This expression is natural to say when you have a cold, fever or other bad condition and can't understand or think about things well temporary. "I'm sorry I have a cold so I'm a bit out of it." ...


7

しとったんや means しておったのだ → していたのだ, "was doing", in colloquial Kansai-ben.


6

謙譲語 was used like this when the speaker was clearly much higher than the listener (... well, at least in fiction). For example, a governor would say to their people,「こちらに参れ」, 「早く申せ」, 「~と存ぜよ」, 「そのように致せ」, or 「ありがたく賜れ」. These are (sometimes) called 尊大語 (arrogant expression?), and insult is usually not intended. I think these were natural wordings between two ...


6

より means "from" (similar to から). うけ(受け) is the 連用形 form of 受ける, "to receive", "to be given", etc.


6

In this particular case, たまらん is his nickname. たま comes from his surname 玉木(たまき), and らん is "run" which comes from his given name 走太(そうた). Of course, it's a pun for 堪らん = 堪らない.


6

Maybe you can try to ask whether the dish contains meat and say that you do not eat meat... something like this : [肉]{にく}は[入]{はい}っていますか? 肉は[食]{た}べないんですが。。。 Is there any meat inside ? I do not eat meat. I guess with this kind of sentence, they will understand that you want something without meat and they may advise you something else if you order ...


6

Yes, it means すみっこ. They say it's 静岡{しずおか} dialect. Source 1・Source 2


5

Roughly, 「やで」 is the Kansai equivalent of the Kanto 「だよ」. It is an affirmation sentence-ender. 「しとるんやで」≒「してるんだよ」


5

I often hear it referred to as [ムービー]{LHHH} (rather than [ムービー]{HLLL}), although I hear カットシーン is equally common.


5

~せい marks the reason for something, basically means "Because of ..." その means "that" Combining these the whole sentence means: Ending up on the rooftop was because of that too.


5

どうもごめいわくおかけしやして・・・ = どうもご[迷惑]{めいわく}(を)おかけしまして・・・ ~しやして(しやす) means ~しまして(します) in regional (probably Edo / 江戸っ子言葉) accent. おか(掛)けします/おかけしました is the humble form of かけます/かけました. 「申し訳ありません(でした)」 or 「すみません(でした)」 is being left out after the おかけしやして・・・. どうもご迷惑をおかけしまして、(すみませんでした。) (I am sorry that) I (or, in this context, "he" = 矢吹丈) caused trouble / ...


5

いい味がしますが、非常に美味しいじゃありません。 おいしいじゃありません。 (i-adjective + じゃありません。・じゃないです。) sounds ungrammatical (even though you can say おいしいじゃありませんか!おいしいじゃないですか! It's good, isn't it? / Isn't it good?). I think you could say more like: いい味はしますが、・味はいいですが、非常においしいというわけでは・というほどでは・というほどでもありません。 Alternatively, I think you could also say: ...


5

I'm a lacto-ovo-pescatarian who eats fish but not other seafood, who is living in Japan. The most bewildering thing about your question for the Japanese server is that most Japanese do not consider seafood to be meat. The other confusing part is that they don't generally think in terms of a dish being vegetarian or not (the majority of vegetable dishes in ...


4

「(~って)ことにならあね」 I think it's slurred 「(~という)ことになる+わ(や)+ね」 i.e. 「(~という)ことになる(だろう)よ・よね」 For example: 酒がまずくならあ! ≒ 酒がまずくなる(よ/わ)!


4

It's the passive of たたっこむ, which is an elided form of 叩き込む, which here figuratively means 'to throw someone in prison'. Thus a translation might be: That bastard Joe, could it be that he's going to end up getting thrown in prison?


4

In your sentence, 「恋愛ごとと」 consists of following parts: 恋愛 + ごと + と And ごと comes from こと(事), which means anything related to the noun before ごと。In this sentence, 「恋愛ごと」 means anything related to love affairs. Another example, 人ごととは思えない (I don't think it's an affair of other people), 人ごと is often written as 他人事 私事(わたくしごと) personal matter, personal ...


4

You are parsing that part incorrectly. There is no such word 「ごとと」. It should be parsed as: 「[恋愛]{れんあい}ごと + と + 断絶していた」 「恋愛ごと」 means "love-related matters". You will encounter this usage of 「ごと」 quite often. See definition 二-12-㋐ in : https://kotobank.jp/word/%E4%BA%8B-502856#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 「と」 is of ...


3

間すらない is 間 + すら + ない, where すら is a particle usually translating to "even", so 声をかける間すらない means "hadn't even time to say anything".


3

Its official translation, SpotPass, doesn't help understand いつの間に通信. But Wikipedia says its literal translation is Unnoticed Communication. いつの間に means 'unnoticed', or 'before one notices it's happening'. いつの間にか夏が終わってしまった。 The summer had gone before I knew / all too soon. いつの間に in いつの間に通信 implies the connection is done silently, before you are aware ...


3

どゆこと is a shortening of どういうこと. 言う is often pronounced ゆう and the ゆ appears in all sorts of inflections of いう, like ゆえない for いえない or ゆって for いって etc. TV subtitles often use spellings that are supposed to reflect words as they might be spoken, like どゆこと or やってます for やっています or やだ for いやだ. In the case of どゆこと it conveys maybe a little extra surprise, because ...


3

There are a lot of metaphors in common around the world. This is a good example of one such metaphor - the extension is quite logical (give help > give a hand (to help) > lend a hand), and it wouldn't surprise me to find many more examples of similar metaphors around the world. There are others that are less common, such as Japanese's 猫をかぶる - the idea of ...


3

Ote(おて) You show your hand to your dog and say "ote", and the dog our your paw on your hand. I'm not sure the command is common in America, so if you are not sure what is ote, you can watch this video. Osuwari(おすわり) is also common, which is equivalent to sit. Fuse(ふせ) is a command for a dog to duck/get down. You can watch this video to have idea of fuse. ...


3

My real question here would be: "Would that gentleman have referred to you as 「あなた」 if you were a Japanese girl of your age?" If that is how he usually refers to others, then that is just his speech style. Whether that is common or not is not his concern. In all of my life as a Japanese-speaker living in Japan since birth, I honestly have yet to encounter ...


3

A Japanese thesaurus has an entry. In short, 信用 means that you believe them not to lie to you, and 信頼 that you trust them to work as you expected. These are often but other aspects of the same matter, but for example, a clever lawyer might be 信用できないが信頼できる to the client, and your nice but incompetent friend is 信用できるが信頼できない to you. Unfortunately, Google ...


3

The word here is やる 'do'. 連用形 + やがる is a way of demeaning the participator in an action. Much like -て + しまう, it indicates discontent with the fact that the action happened; but unlike with しまう, the discontent is directed primarily at the person who chose to do the action (rather than しまう's focus more on the typically unintended action itself). It can be ...


3

Although Shinmeikai and Daijiten have these as being exactly the same, Meikyō provides a narrow band of usage for 拡げる. [This answer was rewritten to reflect this.] 拡げる is used for "broaden" or "enlarge," but not for "unfurl". 広げる can be used for all three. There is another kanji associated with ひろげる, 展げる, which is used only in the sense of "unfurl". It's ...


3

Is the sentence それじゃ... a question or just an opinion or something else? could it always be a question if it contains the word いくつ? It is a statement, not a question. Whether or not 「いくつ」 makes the sentence a question depends on the other words used (and the sentence structure). 「いくつからだがあっても」 here means "no matter how many bodies you've got" ...


3

I can't think of a succinct word to express the idea of pescetarianism in Japanese. This may sound ironical, considering that the Japanese had been pescetarian before Meiji era. That said, I would explain in layman's word like [私]{わたし}は、[肉類]{にくるい}が[苦手]{にがて}なのですが、これは[魚介類]{ぎょかいるい}[主体]{しゅたい}の[料理]{りょうり}ですか? This expression may sound stilted, but it ...


3

In a more broken style (a little bit vulgar), you can also say: 自分にイラついた 自分にムカついた



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