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11

留 means stay, and 守 means guard, so 留守 literary means "stay and guard (home)". It actually used to mean just like this in the old Japanese. 留守 referred to keeping the house while the master is away from home. However, such usage is dying or at least very literary now. The main meaning of 留守 in modern Japanese is "not at home". "留守にする" always means "be away ...


11

Lovin' the question! That is a very funny reply that only Japanese-learners could use. Trust me, you will get an instant laughter everytime you say that to a Japanese-speaker in your life from now on. You are lucky! 「不束者」 is a humble expression pretty much reserved for marriage-related greetings by and about a girl. That is what you, as a bride, call ...


8

しょわー I think it's an onomatopoeia of the fizzing sound from soda.


8

Basically it's a joke. Since most otakus supposedly feel more comfortable in 2D world (anime/manga) than 3D world (reality), this guy makes a play on it and says he feels fine in 3D because he comes from a 4D world.


8

幻影【げんえい】 / 幻【まぼろし】: Almost the same, except that the former being 漢語 and the latter being 和語. Some ghostly or dreamy things that may or may not exist. 「幻の大陸」 means a continent whose existence is not confirmed. 幻想【げんそう】: This comes off to me as "imagination", "fantasy" or "fiction" rather than "illusion". It's in titles of many comics and games, but we ...


7

の here is not a possessive の, it's a nominalizer, a formal noun. こんな is adjectival and cannot by itself constitute a noun phrase. In other words, こんな means "this type of", こんなの means "this type of thing".


6

First, the object of 知る must be specified with を particle. You have to say 「礼儀を知る」, not 「礼儀が知る」. (You can say 「Xが分かる」, though) Dictionary says 礼儀 is courtesy, while マナー is manner. 礼儀を知らない人間 is someone who speaks too frankly to elders, someone don't express gratitude, and someone who cannot use honorific expressions, and so on. Well, it may be true that, ...


6

First, 「[今度]{こんど}」 can be used to refer to an event occuring in all of the three time frames below: The recent past The present The near future Though I have no idea what bilingual dictionaries say about this, you could verify this with any medium-size monolingual Japanese dictionary. Which one of the three the word 「今度」 refers to will ...


5

「つー」 is the common contracted form of 「という」 and furthermore, of 「っていう」. In the order of formality, it is 「という」、「っていう」 and 「(っ)つー」. Learners should know that among the three, 「(っ)つー」 borders on slang. DO NOT use it with your teacher, boss, etc. Needless to say, 「つー」 is pronounced exactly the same as 「つう」. (That is only if you are pronouncing 「つう」 ...


5

I can answer for the examples given. We have to go back to their origin as Sino-Japanese terms, and in particular to their Chinese pronunciation. Now I can't actually go back to the Middle Chinese pronunciation the Japanese reading reflects, but Wiktionary may. In any case, if you take the final characters, you can see on the MDBG Chinese to English ...


5

Answer I'm a native speaker and I'm sure that there's no difference between them. It's a evidence for it that Japanese government uses 外人 on its public document. Reference It's said that 外人(さん) should not be used because few people feel discriminated when Japanese call them 外人. Thus, especially on public document (e.g. TV programs), 外国人 are used ...


4

As for the pronunciation, read as it is written in katakana. There is no special rule you have to consider. However, both コップ and カップ are commonly used in Japanese, and that may be the source of confusion. So let's see the difference. コップ: pronounced as KOPPU. This roughly corresponds to a mug, but can refer to a cylinder-shaped cup made of glass like ...


4

Tenses generally do not correspond well between English and Japanese. Japanese-speakers usually just use the present tense to talk about near future events and we could always tell from the context. Natural-sounding Japanese sentences for "You will not feel good if you eat such food." would be:  「そんなもの[食]{た}べてると[元気]{げんき}になれないよ。」  ...


4

They're not antonyms. They're very different from each other. 立 on it's own means to stand up, to erect and stuff like that. When you use this Kanji in a word like in the case of [朝立]{あさだ}ち which means early morning erection, you can see how the 立 fits into the word, i.e your manhood being erect. In the other word [夕立]{ゆうだち} which means sudden evening ...


4

We have two different words here -- two different で's. Auxiliary verb vs. Particle. In the phrase 「[秋]{あき}の[風]{かぜ}は[静]{しず}かで」, the 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (= "continuative form") of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. Thus, the phrase will surely be followed by another phrase in regular prose-style writing. As a title of a creative writing, however, ...


3

In that context, 「まかなう」 means "to get by or manage with the bare minimum without asking for more". Your dictionary is saying that in many cases, only 思う is used nowadays instead of using 想う, which people have tended to prefer in the past.   Example: When the eatery staff cook a meal for themselves using only what is left and available in the kitchen ...


3

日本間 A room created using traditional Japanese architecture, interior design, construction materials. More of an objective/neutral term relating to the style/structure of the physical room. Japanese houses nowadays are more or less westernized. They are built using modern construction techniques and styles but usually there will be one or more rooms that ...


3

Perhaps the following would reek of Chinese thinking, where 原因 for example is traditionally thought of as two words. 原因 = 因 of the 原, i.e. causing reason 結果 = 果 which has 結, i.e. the produced result Both words arose in Chinese as a way to eliminate homophones by adding redundant adjectives (obviously all reasons are causing, and all results are produced). ...


2

Do you mean 原因と結果? 因 signifies the cause, as in 原因 or 要因. 果 signifies the result, as in 結果 or 効果. So when you make the contraction, you are using the kanji that holds those individual meanings. In this case, it wouldn't make sense to not use those kanji. In the example you gave, 原効 doesn't hold the intended meaning. So in this particular case, it seems ...


2

(This is intended to be a "simple answer". I assumed the OP does not just want to know how to pronounce コップ, which is relatively trivial - see note - but when to use コップ and when to use カップ, which is confusing.) There are two similar words with different meanings - コップ and カップ, kOppu and kAppu. カップ (kAppu) is the general word, It is typically used to ...


2

First of all, there's only one modern polite word to call a foreigner and it is 外国人. There are other phrases too, such as 海外の人 or 海外の方. The latter one is used more often. However, you mostly hear 外国人 when a politician talks from a tribune or an overly politically correct Japanese person tries to be polite. In fact the normal way to refer to a foreigner is ...


1

From my personal experience, 「亡くなる」 is the most neutral word. 「先生のお父さんはがんで亡くなられたよ」 - "Our teacher's father died from cancer" 「死ぬ」 is a strong word that is usually avoided by polite people, but is used to express emphasis or to deliberately offend. It can also be used to talk about animals. 「勝手に死ね!」 - Literally, "Die on your own!", but is very strong and ...


1

Oddly enough I was referred to as くろじゃ by elementary school students and one old man when I went to Japan for a ten day exchange. I figured out こくじん was the correct term before those incidents, and I became confused after hearing natives say another way.


1

As you understand, in this case, "今度" means "next time" or "another time". And "一度" means "once". The problem is relationship between word. "once" is related to after part. "一度やりましょうか" means "Let's try one time". Then add "今度"(next time). "Let's play one time, in next time.". Ex. (Tom: Mr.Kato, do you play tennis?) (Kato: I play tennis before.) 加藤: ...


1

You can break なの down into the formal noun の and the adnominal copula な (i.e., a form of だ which shows up before nouns). Your sentence: Basically, the sentence (彼が)男の子だ is embedded into は知ってる by turning it into a noun using の.   (彼が)男の子だ ⇒[(彼が)男の子な]のは知ってる Alternatives: You could also write it as 男の子であるのは知ってる "I know that he's a boy." which ...



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