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8

People usually say エスカレーターに乗る, エスカレーターで8階まで上がる, etc. エスカレーターを乗り継ぐ is not common, but it would be accepted if one wants to explicitly say (for whatever reason) riding several escalators in succession. エスカレーターを乗り継いで1階から8階まで上がる (cf. 電車を乗り継いで東京から九州まで行く)


8

Yes, 上 in a restaurant menu is read じょう, and it means "deluxe", "premium" or "high grade". But 上 is often not the highest ranked menu, because restaurants commonly offer 特上 menus, too. 特上【とくじょう】 (lit. super deluxe) > 上【じょう】 (lit. deluxe) > 並【なみ】 (lit. normal) So practically, 上 is often considered as "middle grade". Another traditional way to express ...


7

人材 usually means "human resources" because the kanji 材 means "resource" or "material." While a good 人材 is always a precious thing, I doubt 人材 itself necessarily means "talented." For example, a boss may say 彼は素晴らしい人材だ referring to his person and it means something like "He's a capable/talented person". But 彼は人材だ wouldn't make much sense. And 作り上げる here is ...


6

The Sino-Japanese 発汗{はっかん}する 'perspire' sounds more like a formal, technical term, like you might find in a medical context. It isn't particularly common in normal speech. Imagine saying this in English: Man, I just ran five miles! I perspired so much! Sounds pretty silly, right? The first sentence sounds like casual English, but then I use the ...


6

There is no word for 'it'. Japanese is a very contextual language and the 'it' will be inferred from context. To take some of your examples, if you are walking down the street and you say "it's cold" your friend will know what you mean without talking about weather. The 'it' adds absolutely no new/useful information. Similarly, if you say 寒{さむ}いですね your ...


6

霞む has that sense, though relationship is reverse. In short, 主役{しゅやく}が霞む{かすむ} means that the main character is overshadowed by another character. If you want the subject to be the one who overshadows, you can say ◯◯が 主役を食う{くう} or use counterparts of to surpass or to overwhelm(凌駕{りょうが}する・圧倒{あっとう}する). (You should be careful that aspect of these verbs is ている ...


6

These can be divided into two large categories. 上手い ≒ 巧い ≒ good at something, skillful 彼女は料理がうまい。 She is good at cooking. 美味い ≒ 旨い ≒ delicious, yummy この料理はうまい。 This dish is delicious. The difference between 上手い and 巧い is much smaller, but 上手い is "good" in general, while 巧い is closer to "technical" or "skillful". The difference between 美味い and ...


5

Seems to be the imperative-form verb 楽{たの}しめ together with the particle よ. 楽しめ 楽{たの}しむ is the original verb, which means "to enjoy oneself". 楽{たの}しめ, the imperative form, is formed by changing む to め. Imperative-form verbs are blunt, and are used in emergencies, in commands, to be rude, etc. Thus 楽{たの}しめ roughly means "Enjoy yourself!" (As a command). ...


5

Naruto's answer covers it well, but it might be helpful to think of these words in terms of their analogues in other uses. For example, 上手い can obviously be connected to 上手{じょうず}, the basic word for being good at something. 美味い can be connected to 美味{おい}しい, the go-to for delicious." 旨い can be connected to [旨味]{うまみ} and the general sense of savoriness -- you ...


5

I originally thought とわかった was と分かった It is, but it might better help to translate it as identified here, rather than understood. That sentence means: The people whom they identified at the hospital as (having) "Economy Class Syndrome" numbered 19 besides/in addition to this woman.


4

Basically, narcotics can be translated as 麻薬, which at least includes opioids like morphine and cocaine, but does not usually include 覚醒剤 like amphetamine or so-called 合法ドラッグ (legal drugs). If you need to use these terms strictly and professionally, you'll have to read serious review articles carefully, since it's "officially defined" in different ways by ...


4

I think the 神様も楽しむ in the headline means: 神様も桜を楽しむ(のか)? -- The gods enjoy cherry blossoms, too? or 神様も桜を見て楽しむ(のか)? -- The gods enjoy seeing cherry blossoms, too? with 桜を(見て) being left out. I believe 楽しむ can be used intransitively, as in: テレビを見て楽しみました。 (←more natural than テレビを見ることを楽しみました。) ゲームをして楽しみました。 遊園地に行って、一日中、思いっきり楽しみました。


3

It means "Maybe, I'm to blame too".


2

切る in this context is like up in eat up (as opposed to eat) or out in sell out (as opposed to sell), which adds the meaning of thoroughly/completely to the original verb. 飲みきる to drink up 疲れきる to be exhausted 最後までやり切る to push on to the end So this ぬけきらん means "cannot go through it (e.g., a tunnel) completely". でえ/で is not the place marker, ...


2

I believe chocolate-san is right and I have the website of the Japan Organic Agriculture Association in Japanese and English to prove it. It turns out this "teikei" 「提携」 (lit. "cooperation") has been around since 1978. The longer names are 産消提携{さんしょうていけい} and 生消提携{せいしょうていけい}. It seems the problem, aside from getting the transliteration wrong, was that the ...


2

As a nuance, 一時(いちじ) means tentative or temporary, like: [一時的]{いちじてき}[措置]{そち} - tentative measure 一時[立替]{たてかえ} - temporary financing 一時的[避難]{ひなん} - temporary evacuation 一時(いっとき)means momentary or transient, like: [一時]{いっとき}の[憩]{いこ}い - a short break [訊]{き}くは[一時]{いっとき}の恥、訊かぬは一生の恥 - It's a momentary shame for you to ask a ...


1

They have different meanings. Because they mean different things, you can't freely replace one by the other. 「とどまらず」is a negation of 「とどまる」, and 「のみならず」 is a negation of 「のみなり」. Here, the 「とどまる」 is a verb, the 「のみ」 is an adverbial particle, and the 「なり」 is an auxiliary verb of determination. Having said that, the meanings the two words have are: ...


1

"Building a talented person" may not be the most natural English, but it still makes a lot of sense. What is it that you find hardly-sensical about it, given that you seem to be okay with "building (a) talent/ability"? Is it because you think "build" shouldn't be applied to living, sentient beings like humans? I think the meaning of 人材, in this case, is ...


1

I’m comfortable with the lyrics, "If I die tonight" being followed by the second verse, "live it up" as translated in English. But I’m uncomfortable with the Japanese wording, “楽しめよ” coming after “If I die tonight.” It doesn't make sense. “楽しめよ” is an imperative form of “楽しむ,” meaning “enjoy (the life, game, sports, journey, drinking, you name it).” How ...



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