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10

It is most likely a coding mistake. When products are internationalized, strings in the code are changed depending on the locale of the user. In this case, their template is something like "%s\u00AE:" where %s is the localized string. \u00AE is ®. They obviously haven't filed a trademark on 体感温度, but rather some formula they use that is different from ...


7

It is exactly as you say. 「~~をする」 can mean "to have ~~ (as a natural characteristic)". It is usually used in the form 「~~をしている」,「~~をしていた」or 「~~をした」. The form 「~~をする」 is not used in a real-life situation; It is only found in dictionaries or a place like this where grammar or vocabulary is discussed. Among those forms, 「~~をした」 is always followed ...


6

出席 means “to attend to something” whilst 参加 means “to (participate into/actively take part in) something”. For example you can attend (出席) a meeting, without saying your opinion (参加). 会議に出席はしても、意見は述べない 参加 instead is – like you described well in your example – for really taking part. You could also take a look here: Link Global Solutions Inc., ...


6

奇術【きじゅつ】: Illusion or stage magic, which has tricks and is performed by real magicians all over the world. A person who does this is called マジシャン or 奇術師. But in this sense, the most common word is katakana マジック. Table magic is often called 手品【てじな】, too. 魔法【まほう】: Supernatural kind of magic. Typical 魔法 is what you can find in Harry Potter franchise or various ...


5

揃う is used when all the members of a certain group/family/section get together. When used for inanimate objects, it means that everything that composes a certain larger thing gets together. 揃った? Is everyone here? 部品が揃った All the pieces (of a machine, etc) are prepared. You can use 全員(が) or すべて(が) with 揃う, but it's usually optional and doesn't ...


5

「[掘]{ほ}る」 actually does not mean "to carve", "to engrave" or "to chisel". Instead, it means "to dig (up)". 「[穴]{あな}を掘る」 = "to dig a hole" 「いもを掘る」 = "to dig up potatoes" You are probably thinking of 「[彫]{ほ}る」, which means what you stated. 「メダルに[名前]{なま}を彫る」 = "to engrave one's name on a medal" 「[仏像]{ぶつぞう}を彫る」 = "to carve a Buddha" ...


5

First off, you should have mentioned what the thing is that is making the sound シャリン. That is the unmentioned subject of this sentence. " As far as I can tell, it's modifying 音, sound.." No, it is not. It is modifying the verb 鳴り響く. "the only word "シャリン" that I've been able to find is 車輪, which means wheel" Why would anyone write 「車輪」 as ...


5

「そいつあ」 is a colloquial pronunciation of 「そいつは」. This is most common among male speakers around Tokyo in their informal speech. It is not something they would use in school or business.   Particle 「は」 is often pronounced like 「あ」 in other areas as well when combined with certain words in informal situations. For example: 「それは」("That is ~~.") ⇒ 「そりゃあ」 or ...


5

The 'あ' is a kind of intornation of 'は' in Edo, where is now called as Tokyo. It sounds a little old fashioned and very frank situation. Often, I hear it in Rakugo.


4

You probably mean 意気込み(Ikigomi in Romaji, いきごみ in Hiragana). 意気込み means your enthusiasm trying to do something. 意気込み is sometimes used like "今の意気込みをお願いします。" which means "Tell me your enthusiasm to try this." This phrase is often heard some TV program, say a sports player is asked this question for his/her short comment on something about to try.


4

もちろん is used when you want to say "of course". If you need it to be formal => もちろんです。 はい is formal to say yes and other stuff. うん is like はい but casual, not to use to people you protocolly respect.


4

It is more than just a common word; It is used everywhere except for in formal, technical, business or academic writing as the word has a light and somewhat onomatopoeic quality to it. It is not really slangy although it is informal. It is the kind of word that makes a conversation sound alive as it gives a certain rhythm that just sounds good to native ...


4

What foregin word is マスカット derived from? As already pointed out in the comment section, the word is derived from "muscat", a type of grape. What is the most commonly used word in Japanese for green grape? The usual word for "green grape" (precisely in this generality) is 白ブドウ. Is マスカット an accurate translation for green grape? In Japan, マスカット ...


4

Both 時間帯 and タイムゾーン work, and both are very common ways to speak about time zones. But one thing you should know is that 時間帯 also describes the specific period of time in a day. Say, 朝の時間帯 means "the morning time" and used in this way it doesn't describes time zones. In short, if it is clear your sentence is talking about time zones, you can use either, but ...


4

二人の忍 will simply mean "two ninja" or "a couple of ninja" as in "there are a couple of ninja out there." If you emphasize the two ninja as a team, who always act together, then try 忍【しのび】の二人【ふたり】組【ぐみ】. This one is neutral, which doesn't sound foreign nor old. Alternatively, 双忍【そうにん】 is not a word listed in dictionaries, but it's actually used to refer to a ...


3

Both 揃う and 集める include objects or living being coming together at one location, but there's an important difference: 集(め・ま)る is more or less a neutral collection 揃う on the other hand includes a connotation of the collection being sufficient or complete  You can 集める the pieces of a puzzle and end up with 1000 out of 1500, with 500 missing; but if the ...


3

A noun with a plural form that's the same as its singular form does not make it an uncountable noun. No English speaker would tell you that "sheep" is uncountable even though its plural form is still "sheep." Kanji (and its plural form, kanji) is definitely a countable noun in English. I don't know what makes you think that Japanese nouns are uncountable in ...


3

If you're really interested only in grammatical and semantic clarification, yes, you are understanding that sentence correctly. That would be still somewhat funny to the eyes of native speakers by its nature, but at least you don't have to worry about your tattoo being listed in sites like this. If you want to separate that sentence into two lines, yes, ...


3

「オシ」 comes from the verb 「[推]{お}す」, which means "to recommend". You may already know the word 「[推薦]{すいせん}する」, which means the same. Notice the same kanji is used in both. 「イチ」, of course, means 「[一番]{いちばん}」. Thus, 「イチオシ」 is a colloquial (kind of slangy but not too much) word meaning "one's best recommendation". Finally, 「チョク」 in 「レコチョク」 is 「[直]{ちょく}」 in ...


3

In general, answer is no. Ordinary Japanese who never lived in Australia or NZ, don't understand the word. In Japan,most familiar word is オージー・ビーフ. Many understand origin of the beef is Australia. In other means. OG. Office Girl. But it is not used so many today. OG Sohken. Osaka Gas company's IT and think tank subsidiary. Abbreviation of Osaka Gas Sohgo ...


3

As a beginner, you would not need to know any of the three words if you want to know the truth. Seriously, you would clearly need to know at least a few thousand other words already to use any one of those three correctly and naturally in a sentence. Above is my answer in all honesty, but in case you insist... 「租借」 is the leasing of a territory between ...


3

Adding to the other answers and regarding the phrase あつい水, I'd like note this is possible in certain contexts. An article on Tokyo Language Center: 誤用?「熱い水」 「地球の環境」がテーマの番組で、深海を探査するシーンで「摂氏200度をこえる熱い水がふきだしている」というフレーズが聞こえてきました。 このシーンでは「摂氏200度をこえるお湯」はそぐわないんですね。なんか科学的な雰囲気が壊れてしまい、「温泉でのんびり」という感じになってしまいそうで・・・ ...


2

「距離{きょり}を置{お}く」 would fit this context. If the separation is more passive, rather than intentional/active, then 「離{はな}れ離{ばな}れになる」 These are expressions for drifting apart. "Losing/ending a friendship" has much different expressions. 「縁{えん}を切{き}る」 「関係{かんけい}を損{そこ}なう・失{うし}う」 「~はもうおしまい」


2

I think that kanji is countable in Japanese (漢字一文字、漢字二文字) and I would say it should be countable in English, too (one kanji, two kanji). The plural form in English is often adopted (sometimes wrongly, but never mind exceptions) from the original language (one corpus, two corpora; one phenomenon, two phenomena). I'd say kanji in English should be countable ...


2

If you want a noun phrase, you could use: 「ラジオ[向]{む}きの[声]{こえ}」 「ラジオに向いている声」 「ラジオに向いてる声」 All are natural-sounding, stress-free phrases. If you want to form a sentence like "You have a ~~~ voice.", here is the perfect expression: Use of する to describe one's colour


2

As @Eric says, あれほど means "so much" or "to such an extent". Best I can tell, this sentence says, "Given that you used to hate boxing so much, why have you suddenly become so seriously motivated [to box]?" However, as @oldergod mentions, あれほど would mean close "to such an extent", or "that much" rather than "so much". You hated boxing that much, what ...


1

I don't know if I understand "radio voice" correctly but it might be... 「[声優]{せいゆう}みたいな[声]{こえ}」 声優 means voice actor or actress. If you want to praise his/her voice, than I prefer you to tell so. It's hard to imply why you say that. I like your voice / [君]{きみ}の声が[好]{す}きだ You're voice is cute / [可]{か}[愛]{わい}い声だね


1

「2[音節]{おんせつ}は[音]{おと}のすわりがいいと[好]{この}まれる[傾向]{けいこう}があるのです。」 「すわりがいい」 can mean a few different things and in this case, it is important to treat it in pair with 「音の」. It is not about any other kind of すわり that the author is talking about. 「音のすわりがいい」 would mean "aurally pleasing or agreeable" in my own words. "Two-syllable words tend to be preferred ...


1

I imagine it means something like 違和感や不快感がなく自然なさま in this case.



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