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11

Lovin' the question! That is a very funny reply that only Japanese-learners could use. Trust me, you will get an instant laughter everytime you say that to a Japanese-speaker in your life from now on. You are lucky! 「不束者」 is a humble expression pretty much reserved for marriage-related greetings by and about a girl. That is what you, as a bride, call ...


9

べき is a fun part of modern Japanese grammar with odd rules probably best explained using the historical explanation. History べし used to be a 助動詞{じょどうし} (auxiliary). Connecting to things before it: べし followed the 終止形{しゅうしけい} (conclusive form) normally, and with ラ変{へん} verbs it followed the 連体形{れんたいけい} (adnominal form). (NB: One could think of it as u ...


9

(すごく古い質問ですが、偶然見つけたので) Although the number is small, there seems to be some "英製和語" (an English word of Japanese-origin, that has a significantly different meaning from the original Japanese word): Tycoon (大君【たいくん】 in Japanese is a dated word for shogun, not a businessperson) Hibachi (Japanese 火鉢【ひばち】 is a heating device and not used for cooking) Satsuma ...


8

Basically it's a joke. Since most otakus supposedly feel more comfortable in 2D world (anime/manga) than 3D world (reality), this guy makes a play on it and says he feels fine in 3D because he comes from a 4D world.


8

幻影【げんえい】 / 幻【まぼろし】: Almost the same, except that the former being 漢語 and the latter being 和語. Some ghostly or dreamy things that may or may not exist. 「幻の大陸」 means a continent whose existence is not confirmed. 幻想【げんそう】: This comes off to me as "imagination", "fantasy" or "fiction" rather than "illusion". It's in titles of many comics and games, but we ...


8

しょわー I think it's an onomatopoeia of the fizzing sound from soda.


7

It might be valuable to preface this by saying that many buildings in Japan do not have any kind of central heating system. They rely on various kinds of discrete units to provide heating. The difference in the units will be in their heating mechanisms and the extent to which they can heat a certain area. To state the difference very simply, a ストーブ in home ...


7

I work at a university in Japan, worked at a different one previously, and was a visiting scholar for a year and a half at another one. [実験室]{じっけんしつ} = a real laboratory -- as the term would be used in English. This is where you would conduct actual experiments in the natural sciences. [研究室]{けんきゅうしつ} = either a professor's office or a room that students ...


6

I think you're more or less correct about the meaning which I would loosely translate as Be careful of dark alleys and people who are saying things that are too good to be true! While I agree that the actual advice isn't terribly useful, I think the point of such signs is to keep such things on your mind so you're more aware of your surroundings in ...


6

Most naturally, you can use one of the two below. 「[遊]{あそ}ぶべきでない。」 「遊ぶべきではない。」 The second one places more emphasis on the negation.


5

「正午」 only has one meaning --- "12:00 p.m." 「昼」 has a few different meanings --- "daytime", "12:00 p.m.", "lunch", "afternoon", etc. So, the two words are only interchangeable when talking about "12:00 p.m. (= 'noon')". Strictly speaking, however, it is always better to use 「正午」 when referring to "noon" in order to avoid any ambiguity.


5

Informally, we say 「~~に[乗]{の}る」 or 「~~に[入]{はい}る」. Formally and officially, we say 「~~に[進入]{しんにゅう}する」.


5

"Is there any difference in meaning between 給湯器 and 湯沸器?" Technically speaking, yes, there is a big difference. A 湯沸器 is a little water heater generally installed over the kitchen sink. It has its own tap from which you get hot water. A 給湯器 is much larger than a 湯沸器 and it can be located anywhere in the house or apartment. It can even be located ...


4

They're not antonyms. They're very different from each other. 立 on it's own means to stand up, to erect and stuff like that. When you use this Kanji in a word like in the case of [朝立]{あさだ}ち which means early morning erection, you can see how the 立 fits into the word, i.e your manhood being erect. In the other word [夕立]{ゆうだち} which means sudden evening ...


4

Tenses generally do not correspond well between English and Japanese. Japanese-speakers usually just use the present tense to talk about near future events and we could always tell from the context. Natural-sounding Japanese sentences for "You will not feel good if you eat such food." would be:  「そんなもの[食]{た}べてると[元気]{げんき}になれないよ。」  ...


4

We have two different words here -- two different で's. Auxiliary verb vs. Particle. In the phrase 「[秋]{あき}の[風]{かぜ}は[静]{しず}かで」, the 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (= "continuative form") of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. Thus, the phrase will surely be followed by another phrase in regular prose-style writing. As a title of a creative writing, however, ...


4

With these kinds of words, it often helps to look instead at the relative different constituents: 実験: empiric test, (scientific) experiment 研究: (academic) research/study 実習: practical training Then when you tack 室 to the end, it just makes a room where the respective activities take place: 実験室: room where you perform (scientific) experiments (a.k.a. ...


3

Disclaimer: The only research I do is googling. While not an authoritative source, JP Wikipedia's 研究室 entry says this on the first sentence: 研究室(けんきゅうしつ、laboratory)とは、大学、短期大学、高等専門学校、研究所、企業の研究開発部門の研究の単位であり、また教員、研究者の執務室、部屋、プライベート空間のこと So sometimes, 研究室 is not used to refer to a physical room or a facility, but rather a research division of institutes ...


3

This sign is misleading. The first line 侵入盗犯防止重点地区, which mentions one kind of a crime, has no direct connection to the other part, which mentions another kind of crime. As for the other part, it is pretty much ambiguous. One thing to note is that 暗い道 is used here with double meanings: the literal "dark road" and the metaphorical "hell of a life." It can be ...


3

In that context, 「まかなう」 means "to get by or manage with the bare minimum without asking for more". Your dictionary is saying that in many cases, only 思う is used nowadays instead of using 想う, which people have tended to prefer in the past.   Example: When the eatery staff cook a meal for themselves using only what is left and available in the kitchen ...


3

There seem to be at least two reasons that no one so far has answered your questions. 1) Food names -- the older foods in particular -- differ greatly from one region to another. 2) おぼろ has become increasingly unpopular during the last few decades; therefore, the younger members may actually have never seen or eaten it. " Are there any other common ...


3

正午 is 'noon' as in 12:00 on a 24h clock. 昼 can have the same meaning (2 in the dictionary) or just refer to the afternoon/daytime in general (1 in the dictionary).


2

From my personal experience, 「亡くなる」 is the most neutral word. 「先生のお父さんはがんで亡くなられたよ」 - "Our teacher's father died from cancer" 「死ぬ」 is a strong word that is usually avoided by polite people, but is used to express emphasis or to deliberately offend. It can also be used to talk about animals. 「勝手に死ね!」 - Literally, "Die on your own!", but is very strong and ...


2

おりる and くだる both mean to move from a high place to a low(er) place. The difference is that the former focuses on the end point/result, whereas the latter focuses on the movement and/or the course taken. さがる means to go down or back, often used in relation to some value or standard. You also use it when a part of something (bodily or other) lowers from its ...


2

There is a word that is not used so frequently in everyday speech but that nonetheless performs this task: べからず. You use it in the same was as べき/べし. An example on alc shows the following sentence: 自然を侮るべからず。 Don't underestimate nature. I am not a native of course, so I can't comment on precisely where you should and shouldn't use it, but I'd say in ...


2

旬 is a way to group the day of month by its second decimal digit. The days of months whose second digit is 0, 1, and 2 respectively belong to 上旬, 中旬, and 下旬. Strictly following this rule, the days 30 and 31 should not belong to any of them, but by adjustment, they belong to 下旬. 始め (beginning), 半ば (midst), and 終わり (end) have nothing particularly to do with ...


2

You can break なの down into the formal noun の and the adnominal copula な (i.e., a form of だ which shows up before nouns). Your sentence: Basically, the sentence (彼が)男の子だ is embedded into は知ってる by turning it into a noun using の.   (彼が)男の子だ ⇒[(彼が)男の子な]のは知ってる Alternatives: You could also write it as 男の子であるのは知ってる "I know that he's a boy." which ...



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