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19

In short, that is because "island" is not the only meaning of 「島/しま/シマ」. Besides "island", it can mean "settlement", "arable land by a river", "isolated area", "territory", "turf", "sandbank", etc. Even each section of a supermarket or any sizable store is called 「シマ」. So, it does not have to be the sea water that surrounds a 「島/しま/シマ」. 「[福島]{ふくしま}」 was ...


9

Those are good examples of what my favorite writer [筒井康隆]{つついやすたか} has named 「[全国共通]{ぜんこくきょうつう}いなか[言葉]{ことば}」, which I would translate to "All-Japan Standard Provincial Dialect". It is an imaginary dialect, instead of an existing dialect, that is used in stories. Believe it or not, it is most often used in children's stories. (Which is why I rarely ...


7

「ら」 is a plural suffix. In this case, 「山中ら」 just means "Yamanaka and his opponent", not "Yamanaka and his hangers-on". The hangers-on do not need to take a preliminary physical before a boxing match. "Yamanaka and his opponent pass their preliminary physical."


7

One thing I would need to mention is that the significance of 「おやつ」 as a custom has decreased dramatically since Edo period. Japan had largely been a two-meal-a-day nation until around the middle of Edo. There was no such thing as lunch for many people. Naturally, you would become hungry by around 2 o'clock in the afternoon, which was called 「やつ/やつどき」 by ...


6

「いってえ」 is how the "tough Kanto guy" would colloquially pronounce 「[一体]{いったい}」. 「一体」, when combined with a question word (in this case, どう), is the Japanese equivalent of "on earth", "the heck", "the f***", etc. 「この[品物]{しなもの}の[山]{やま}はいってえどうしたことだ。」 = "How on earth did you get all this mountain of stuff?" Depending on the context, there may be a better ...


6

奇術【きじゅつ】: Illusion or stage magic, which has tricks and is performed by real magicians all over the world. A person who does this is called マジシャン or 奇術師. But in this sense, the most common word is katakana マジック. Table magic is often called 手品【てじな】, too. 魔法【まほう】: Supernatural kind of magic. Typical 魔法 is what you can find in Harry Potter franchise or various ...


6

These are colloquial Japanese for という, ところ and ~ないで. ここ数日というところ means 'around the last few days'.


5

Both means stomach, but おなか or 腹【はら】 refers to the whole abdomen, while 胃【い】 specifically refers to this organ between the esophagus and the duodenum.


5

児戯 is an uncommon and difficult word. 児戯のように簡単 would make sense as a literary expression, and I won't be surprised if I see this in old novels. But if you say this in a conversation today, people would probably say "ジギって何?" 子どもの遊びのように簡単だった is not something people usually say, but it does make sense and better than 児戯 anyway. There are at least two similar ...


5

揃う is used when all the members of a certain group/family/section get together. When used for inanimate objects, it means that everything that composes a certain larger thing gets together. 揃った? Is everyone here? 部品が揃った All the pieces (of a machine, etc) are prepared. You can use 全員(が) or すべて(が) with 揃う, but it's usually optional and doesn't ...


5

「そいつあ」 is a colloquial pronunciation of 「そいつは」. This is most common among male speakers around Tokyo in their informal speech. It is not something they would use in school or business.   Particle 「は」 is often pronounced like 「あ」 in other areas as well when combined with certain words in informal situations. For example: 「それは」("That is ~~.") ⇒ 「そりゃあ」 or ...


5

The 'あ' is a kind of intornation of 'は' in Edo, where is now called as Tokyo. It sounds a little old fashioned and very frank situation. Often, I hear it in Rakugo.


4

It's [一体]{いったい}[何]{なに}を[騒]{さわ}いでいるんだ? or 騒いでいるんですか? "What's the fuss about?" in some regional dialect or the role language for old speakers.


4

What foregin word is マスカット derived from? As already pointed out in the comment section, the word is derived from "muscat", a type of grape. What is the most commonly used word in Japanese for green grape? The usual word for "green grape" (precisely in this generality) is 白ブドウ. Is マスカット an accurate translation for green grape? In Japan, マスカット ...


4

can it also be used as an idiom to refer to "something easy"?- Yes. As the link @oldergod posted on comment suggests, it also has nuances like puerility and worthlessness (I guess it's the same in English, too?). "児戯のように簡単" sounds strange for me (probably because "児戯" alone implies 簡単), and it's more often used in phrases "児戯に類する" and "児戯に等しい". I ...


4

If it's chiefly a "visual redesign", I'd say デザインを新しくします(しました)。("We'll have/We've got a new design!") 更新: It'll mean "update" of website, like adding a new article on WordPress. Maybe デザインの更新 would get your meaning across. The "refresh" sense is limited to browser function. 改築: It sounds like you revamp the site's structure, or something. 改造: Same as ...


4

「ばあ」 is a colloquial contraction for 「をば」. It is sometimes used in fiction, children's stories, etc. to show that the speaker is an older person. In meaning and nuance, 「ばあ」=「をば」= an emphatic 「を」 https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%82%92%E3%81%B0-666115#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 「そのへんばあねり歩いてるよ」= "(someone) often walks around ...


3

Since most of Japanese Question + も patterns ("any- (... not)") are, as you know, only allowed to be used with negative predicates, we usually make some workarounds to express the "every-" idea. Unfortunately, the ways we've taken are not consistent across words, so maybe you're confused by it. any- (+ NEG) no matter - (regular) every- ...


3

A noun with a plural form that's the same as its singular form does not make it an uncountable noun. No English speaker would tell you that "sheep" is uncountable even though its plural form is still "sheep." Kanji (and its plural form, kanji) is definitely a countable noun in English. I don't know what makes you think that Japanese nouns are uncountable in ...


3

As a beginner, you would not need to know any of the three words if you want to know the truth. Seriously, you would clearly need to know at least a few thousand other words already to use any one of those three correctly and naturally in a sentence. Above is my answer in all honesty, but in case you insist... 「租借」 is the leasing of a territory between ...


3

Both 揃う and 集める include objects or living being coming together at one location, but there's an important difference: 集(め・ま)る is more or less a neutral collection 揃う on the other hand includes a connotation of the collection being sufficient or complete  You can 集める the pieces of a puzzle and end up with 1000 out of 1500, with 500 missing; but if the ...


3

There is a difference in usage and meaning between 「こ」 and 「こっ」. While 「こ」 is generally used as diminutive, 「こっ」 is used for different meanings and nuances. デジタル大辞泉 defines 「こっ」 as: [接頭]《接頭語「こ(小)」に促音が加わったもの》形容詞、ときに動詞に付いて、いささか、相当に、はなはだしく、などの意を添える。「―ぱずかしい」「―ぴどい」「―ぱずれる」 My translation: [Prefix] 《Geminated version of prefix 「こ(小)」》Attached to ...


3

It's ちょっと忠告しに、立ち寄ったんだ。 (I just dropped by to give you a piece of advice. ) in a regional dialect or the role language for old speakers. ~~しに means するために, "(in order) to~~".


3

Thanks to @firtree and the other users in the comments for helping me with this. I'll re-post specifically what @firtree stated: I'm afraid that it would always be hard to read the small-font kanji. Native speakers learn lots of kanji by heart, and see them many times, so they recognize them even with unreadable strokes, from the general outline. ...


3

「[自分]{じぶん}で[日本語]{にほんご}を[学]{まな}ぶのは[難]{むずか}しい。」 is nice and grammatical. You could make it sound even more natural by changing 「自分」 to 「ひとり」 or 「自分ひとり」. Furthermore, adult native speakers would use the word 「[独学]{どくがく}」 to mean "to study by oneself". If you were a beginner, though, you would not need to know this word yet; It can wait. One would say: ...


3

There is a clear difference between the two. (I feel for you because I have seen 「おかず」 defined wrongly in smaller bilingual dictionaries.) 「[食]{た}べ[物]{もの}」 refers to any and all kinds of food; It just includes everything people eat. Anything edible is called 「食べ物」. 「おかず」 is different. It is what you eat with rice (or bread) in a meal. It refers to the ...


3

I think おかず refers to side dishes accompanied with rice, while 食べ物 refers to 'food' in general. When Japanese or Chinese eat meals at home, there's usually a bowl of rice per person and several dishes (e.g. fish, meat, vegetable) in the middle. Those dishes are called おかず.


3

Yes there are, but it is a grey area if you include rare, uncommon, creative or archaic readings. People can be creative especially when it comes to kun-readings. Even for a kanji usually used only in compounds you might find a stand-alone usage if you're looking hard enough. Some of these need okurigana, eg. 隷う【したがう】 or 悠か【はるか】, but some don't, eg. ...


3

They use ば for the objective particle を in Kyushu dialect. そのへんばあねり歩いて= そんへんばねり歩いて = そのへんをねり歩あるいて


2

Generally speaking, 「無くす」 would be a more versatile word than 「失う」 as the latter is a more nuanced word. While 「無くす」 is an everyday word that even toddlers can use actively and correctly, you will not see small kids using the word 「失う」 in real life. I think it safe to say that 「失う」 is used more often in writing than in speaking. Only 「無くす」 can be used to ...



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