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11

Euphemism vs. Taboo Words [婉曲語法]{えんきょくごほう} vs. [忌]{い}み[言葉]{ことば} 「[閉]{と}じる」 ("to close") is considered a taboo word for auspicious events such as a wedding party (even though the word itself is something we use without thinking on a daily basis). Thus, we choose to say 「お[開]{ひら}きにする」 to mean "bring (a happy event) to an end". 「閉じる」 is not the only 忌み言葉 ...


10

The word the writer meant was 哀れ If he succeeds, we may stroll through these waning days of spring more aware of aware In English, foreign words are often typeset in italics, and this article follows the convention (although your copypaste did not copy the italics over.)


7

There is no word for 'it'. Japanese is a very contextual language and the 'it' will be inferred from context. To take some of your examples, if you are walking down the street and you say "it's cold" your friend will know what you mean without talking about weather. The 'it' adds absolutely no new/useful information. Similarly, if you say 寒{さむ}いですね your ...


6

It's a phrase to express "despite doing it over and over". You can use it with other verbs e.g. 食べても食べてもお腹がいっぱいにならない、拭いても拭いても落ちない etc


6

[片手]{かたて}でも[指]{ゆび}が[余]{あま}る Picture a toddler counting something by folding his fingers one by one. He is also too young to know to use the same finger more than once. Now, how many 指 (fingers) does a 片手 (one hand) have? The answer is 'five' as the thumb is also considered a 指 in the Japanese-speaking world. 余る means "to be in surplus". If your ...


5

I wouldn't touch upon the provenances of お開き as a mean to avoid 忌み言葉 - ominous word / phrase as they were detailed by other users, and most of today's people wouln't give any thought about it. I wonder how many Japanese would associate it with 忌み言葉 today unless they are oct or nonagenarians. I just would like to say お開き is very popular word which is used ...


4

Basically, narcotics can be translated as 麻薬, which at least includes opioids like morphine and cocaine, but does not usually include 覚醒剤 like amphetamine or so-called 合法ドラッグ (legal drugs). If you need to use these terms strictly and professionally, you'll have to read serious review articles carefully, since it's "officially defined" in different ways by ...


3

「パシャ」 is the onomatopoeia for the sound made when pressing on the shutter-release button on a camera. 「しみる」 has many meanings, but your image would suggest that the word is being used for the meaning of "I'm deeply moved." or "(Something) is going straight to my heart."


3

Used like in the examples you gave: ために -- owing to; basically just a simple "because". せいで -- used to pin fault / blame on something / someone. おかげで -- like yuu-oniichan said, sarcastic, "thanks to"; lit. "due to the (unseen) (favourable) influence of" And my spin on a translation using them: あんたのために殺し屋の地位を失い闇の世界で迫害され身も心もズタボロになった。 Owing to you I lost ...


2

"to apply eye drops" = 「[目薬]{めぐすり}を[差]{さ}す」 Thus, 「さし」 in 「さし[心地]{ごこち}」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (continuative form) of the verb 「差す」. (Note that 心地, all by itself, is read ここち, but with a 連用形 in front, it is read ごこち.) 「Verb in [連用形]{れんようけい} (continuative form) + [心地]{ごこち}」 = "degree or level of pleasantness/comfortableness in performing the ...


2

I think 心地 means nearly "feeling" and ~心地 means "the feeling of doing something" For example, 着心地(the feeling of wearing it), 触り心地(the feeling of touching it), 履き心地(the feeling which you get on it). To put eyedrops in one's eye is translated as 目薬をさす in Japanese, so さし心地 means "the feeling of putting eyedrops in your eye".


2

ために - For your sake, on your behalf So, something was done for person A by person B or C, which person B is angry about over the outcome. せいで - Because of you Something done by person A or happened due to person A's influence or presence which person B is angry about. おかげで - Thanks to you Something done by person A or happened due to person A's influence ...


1

To answer your question, 私は has two words but other similar expression might not. I think a part of your confusion comes from what affix means. In the most basic words, an affix changes meaning of the word to which it is attached. Consider these example in addition to 私は. 私に、私へ、私が、私を、私と, and etc....Do you see that some of what follows 私 could be easily ...


1

入学 means you enter the school (college, university, whatever), and make a fresh start of studying in that school. 中退 means you dropped out from school in midway, and your record of studying there is not acknowledged as any meaningful carrer. However, you were able to use your record of studying in パリ第六大学情報工学部学士課程 in entering パリ11大学情報工学部修士課程. In that ...


1

The most common Japanese word for “participation” will be 参加(さんか)する、like パーティ(組合、会議、ゲーム)に参加する- participate / join in a party (union, meeting, game). 加盟(かめい)is a big word to mean “joining,” that’s applied to big entities e.g. organizations and countries, like EU(三国間協定、連合)に加盟する- participate in Europe Union (three-country treaty, National Labor Union League). ...



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