Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

I think here あそびに means something like "for fun" or "for leisure". In other words, they came on a pleasure trip, not for business or studying. What may be confusing is that it's natural to express this in Japanese directly when you'd express it only indirectly in English. Phrases like "came to visit" or "went to see" generally imply that it's for pleasure ...


7

It's not completely clear from your question whether the problem asks for "any grammatical order" or "the most natural order". While your answer is grammatically correct, the "correct answer" is more natural, and I'll try to explain why. While "annoying" is one translation of 迷惑, often a more fitting translation is "inconsiderate". Although I have seen the ...


7

Anastrophe exists in Japanese: Usual order: 前の彼女が放火、殺人、信号無視の罪で終身刑になったと知って安心した。 Anastrophe: 前の彼女が終身刑になったと知って安心した。放火、殺人、信号無視の罪で。 (Note about the word 終身刑: Strictly speaking, 終身刑 means life imprisonment without parole, and the usual life imprisonment with a possibility of parole is technically called 無期刑. However, in nontechnical context, 終身刑 often ...


6

遊びに来る just means 'come to visit' or 'come to see someone'. It's a common phrase. Don't be too focused on 遊ぶ, it doesn't really mean 'play' or 'hang out' per se. I would translate it as: "I showed my friend, who came to visit from Japan, around London." or some variation of that.


5

Yes, both share the same meaning, though sentence 2 sounds a little unreal (may be it could be possible in a poem or lyrics). There is a word in linguistics called a "syntax marker". Japanese marks a sentence's syntax or structure using particles. Russian does so using word declensions. For languages with neither particles nor declensions, like English and ...


3

It's an information structure and presentation question. The first constituent is typically topic, and the second one is focus: 子供が学校にいる。 (The) kids are at school. (as opposed to somewhere else) 学校に子供がいる。 There are kids at school. (as opposed to, say, adults, or no one at all) Like Darius has said, with questions, they become the following: 子供が学校にいるのか? ...


3

I think the emphasis is on the part with closest proximity to the main verb for the Japanese sentences. As noted by Chocolate's comment: スミスさんは かいしゃのひとと おおさかししゃに あした いきます has an emphasis on あした. スミスさんは ひとりで おおさかししゃに きのう いきました has an emphasis on きのう. I think there are differences with English as well. The first sentence you provided seems ...


2

Yes, the word order makes a slight difference in modality which discribes the thought/emtion/belief of the speaker about the contents of a sentence/sentences towards the listener. 私はじしょを買いました。 じしょを私は買いました。 Both are completely accurate as a sentence in Japanese and mean 'I bought a dictionary' in English as you said. These two sentences can be ...


1

Comment from personal experience: JNat: I cannot add to the technical explanations but I started learning Japanese with "Japanese for Busy People" in my own country, completing the second half after I arrived in Japan. If you are anything like me and at the same stage I was then, it might be encouraging to know that a few months after mastering the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible