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5

To match the tone of "woe" and the slightly older sounding English of the original, why not? 沼地に近寄る者に災いあれ Your それらのための災いは誰が沼に行きます Is, I'm sorry to say, mostly nonsensical: "disasters for the benefit of those, who goes to the swamp?"


3

They have the same meaning of "dangerous", but 危うい is used more in the written language (文語), whereas 危ない is used more in the spoken language (口語). Here's a Chiebukuro question asking about this. 大辞林 has a note in the entry for 危ない ...


1

危ない is "dangerous" while 危うい is "vulnerable" or "not reliable".


-1

明日が... Siginifies specificity and maybe importance (I think), e.g., 明日が会議 or 明日が試合。明日は seems to imply something more vague or mundane, e.g. 明日は仕事 or 明日は暇。You wouldn't say 明日が暇だ。 So, 明日は火曜日 is "tomorrow is (just a) Tuesday," whereas 明日が火曜日 might be more like, "Dude, tomorrow is THE Tuesday, when something special is happening." And when you turn it in to a ...


4

The former (明日は…) is an answer to a question "What day is tomorrow?" while the latter (明日が…) is that to "When is Tuesday?". Edit: "Topic" stands for imformation that's suggested in the preceding context, so when we see 明日は…, we can imagine some contexts that include "明日" e.g. "明日は何曜日?". On the other hand, 明日が火曜日 is inversion of 火曜日は明日, and we can think of ...


3

There is virtually no difference in meaning but there is a slight difference in nuance, therefore, in actual usage. Using 「どのような批判があろう + が」 could make you sound a bit more defensive and/or excited about your own opinion being presented than when using 「どのような批判があろう + と」. The latter would help show your composure as an author better than the former. Without ...


4

Basically, yes they have the same meaning, but normally the company decides which word they use in each case, and a customer or business partner shouldn't use the words interchangeably: If they call themselves as "XX担当" then you call them that way, too. 担当 is treated as a person (even if there were more than one person in charge), so you use 様, not 御中. ...


6

法律 is the general word for "law", as in 「法律を守る」(obey the law),「法律で禁止されている」(forbidden by law) or 「渡辺法律事務所」(Watanabe Law Firm). I believe that the most common use of 法度【はっと】 is to mean "something that is terribly bad manners", and that it's almost always used with ご in front — 「ご法度」. A quick Web search found: 新郎・新婦の恋愛遍歴話はご法度:結婚式でゲストがやってはいけない非常識な行動 ...


3

First, 法律 is more commonly used in spoken and written Japanese than 法度 is. You can verify this notion by how the two words appear in a Google search, with 404 million for the first and 930,000 for the second. Also, ほうりつ when entered in an input bridge will immediately convert to 法律, whereas はっと will likely convert to Katakana, and only with further keyboard ...


5

I wouldn't do that. It's true that some people use お姉さん, but you'll be taking unnecessary risk. For a example, some older women might get offended for being called that way, and some younger women might get offended, too! It's like calling somebody "Hi young woman!". Of course some people will like it. If you say お姉さん to an 大阪のおばちゃん, you might get that ...


2

I ask this because in an exercise in my book it says to use をする with 電話 to form the verb, but on the online dictionary I usually check it says it's 電話する, without を. Similar to fefe's answer on a closely related question, 電話をする is really a phrase, not a "word", so it probably wouldn't show up in a dictionary as a unit. In this case, it might be fair to ...


-4

been in japan for almost 5 years already and have passed n5 and n4, from my conversations and from what i have heard, 電話する is used and the only time i have heard of 電話をする is in the classroom. having said this, it is important to know the usage of を and how it is used/not used in the real world.


3

In addition to the two existing answers, you could also say しんどい一年 or きつい一年.


5

Earthliŋ has already provided a great answer, so instead of repeating what they've got, I figure I'll just fill out the information as it relates to the phrases presented in the question -- ways of saying it without 一【いち】, basically, and how natural they may or may not be. I did a few Google searches for various phrases (putting "quotes" around the terms to ...


5

The main point for saying "rough [time]" is that you should express [time] as a proper time period. (one) day 一日【いちにち】 (one) month [一ヶ月]{いっかげつ} (one) year 一年【いちねん】 (Cf., 良い一日を "Have a nice day".) 大変な一日だった/でした is I think common for "I had a rough day". 大変な一年 works similarly. 難しい一年 works as well, although it's more like "difficult year" than "rough ...


-2

Some others that people are missing: うち: Very informal, but relatively gender-free. Great for otaku. あたえ/あたい: Colloquial female, related to わたし [Name or Title] - You can use your own name or title as a pronoun: マリはあのおもちゃが欲しいの! 先生はおこっていますよ。 おら - Regional male (or regional, colloquial female). Some pedants won't want to admit use of these informal ...


0

わたし (私) - Typical, everyday, formal/informal "I." Err to this whenever possible. あたし (私) - Same kanji, used only for females. Same feel as watashi. わたくし (私) - Hyperformalized version of watashi. No, this does not mean to use this in all formal situations! It is to express extreme politeness. [僕]{ぼく} - Masculine (though not exlusively) "I" used to give ...


0

Not at all, こんばんは is used frequently in everyday (well, "every night") discussion and is absolutely acceptable in both informal and formal situations, and everything in between. However, there are super-informal alternatives; I've heard just ばん、and less often こんばん (confusing, as this just means "this evening") and ばんは (has a strange ring to it). ...


7

In informal situations (like yours, talking to a friend), I see nothing wrong with "先生になりたい" for all kinds of teacher. It is quite common for honorific words to shift towards use as general nouns in informal situations. For example, in informal settings, many will use お母さん (honorable mother) to refer to their own mother.


7

In general, you're correct. Calling yourself as sensei has to be avoided, because it's an honorific word. The better word is 教師【きょうし】. However there is an exception. If you are to become Sensei of elementary schools or kindergartens, I think it is OK to say "小学校の先生になりたい", at least informally. Kids do not understand honorific expressions, and teachers in ...


4

If you mean a classroom teacher as an occupation, I think the general term is 教師{きょうし}. 先生{せんせい} is rather used as a suffix after names or to address/talk about a particular person in honorific terms.


3

In sentence 1, に is not functioning as a time expression. It's like for or as. "I have green tea for breakfast." で when used as a time particle can indicate 1) the age at which something was done: 25歳で日本に行きました。At the age of 25 I went to Japan. 2) the end point of a period of time: 1時間で宿題を終えた。I finished my homework in/after an hour. Neither of these apply ...


6

The word 「[朝飯]{あさめし}」, to begin with, is NOT your most generic word for "breakfast". That word would be 「[朝]{あさ}ご[飯]{はん}」, or more formally,「[朝食]{ちょうしょく}」. This means that it would take a certain group of people and/or certain situations for you to hear the word 朝飯 in natural settings among us native speakers. Who would say 朝飯, then? First and foremost, ...


3

朝飯に茶を飲む drink tea as breakfast 朝飯で茶を飲む drink tea at breakfast In case my English is weird, the former sounds as if the tea was the main part of the breakfast. Only drinking tea, eating nothing else, and calling it 朝飯 is not usual, I think. 朝飯にトーストを食べる sounds good, though. "朝飯のみで茶を飲む" means the speaker drinks tea while having breakfast but not during ...


4

You say 「[朝]{あさ}ごはんに」「[朝食]{ちょうしょく}に」「[朝飯]{あさめし}に」 for "for breakfast". 私は朝飯のみに茶を飲む → I would rather say it this way: 私は[朝食]{ちょうしょく}[時]{じ}にのみお茶を飲む。 私は朝ごはん(or朝食)の[時]{とき}(に)だけお茶を飲む。 私は朝ごはん(or朝食)の[時]{とき}(に)しかお茶を飲まない。etc. ("I only drink tea at breakfast", or in other words, "The only time I drink tea is (at) breakfast"). You use に for [時]{とき} ...


8

Both means today, but the meaning depends on the pronunciation. きょう refers to the day after yesterday, the day before tomorrow. 今日【きょう】は雨【あめ】が降【ふ】っています。 It's raining today. こんにち means present age, nowadays, or these days. 今日【こんにち】の若者【わかもの】は新聞【しんぶん】を読【よ】まない。 Young people of today do not read newspapers. This difference is rather strict; ...


0

To see that 今日{きょう} is a special reading, you need to look in a kanji dictionary. 「きょ」 is not listed as a possible reading of 「今」. 「う」 is not listed as a possible reading of 「日」. 「今日」 is a 熟字訓{じゅくじくん} which is best explained in the wikipedia entry for "kanji".


5

Basically, 年休 and 有休 are just the two ways to abbreviate 年次有給休暇. They are usually interchangeable. Strictly speaking, 年休 has more formal, technical nuance, and it specifically refers to 年次有給休暇 as defined in the Japanese law. 有休 is a more casual and popular (and thus ambiguous) word. It's sometimes not limited to 年次有給休暇 and may be confused by any other kind ...


5

I think @ssb's どうすることもできない would work. I'd like to add some more phrases: (~に)どうこうできることではない。 (~に)どうこうできるものでもない(orではない)。 (~に/~の力で)何とかできるものでもない。 (~には/~の力では)どうにもできない。 (~の力では)なんともならない。 etc. 例文: どんなにチームが好きだからって、試合ばかりは私にどうこうできるものでもない。 明日は晴れるといいけど、こればっかりはどうにもできないなあ。 You also have a more literary phrase: ~~の力の[及]{およ}ぶところではない。 例文: ...


4

One way to do it is just to say コントロールできない. 試合(の結果)はコントロールできない Another might be to say どうすることもできない. Glancing on alc, I found one interesting expression: あずかり知らぬところである. It's used in this sentence: "have no control over how the dice of life are cast" 人生のさいころの目がどう出るかは自分のあずかり知らぬところである That said, you probably don't want to spout this one off in everyday ...


1

I also found out that すみません can be used to express "I am sorry" when doing something wrong like unintentionally stepping on someone's foot. And for expressing "pardon" if we don't understand what the interlocutor says I think we can use 'はい?' with rising intonation. And 'はい?' here is a question like "yes?" Or "I'm sorry?".


4

区別 and 差別 both carry a mean of "discrimination" but have distinct meanings in Japanese. 区別 is for putting things in different categories or domains, i.e. the ability to distinguish. For instance, the phrase [善悪]{ぜんあく}の区別 = to discriminate between good and evil. 差別 often means discrimination in the pejorative, i.e. to place a [差]{さ}, here meaning ...


6

具合【ぐあい】 - Health / condition. It's worth noting that this doesn't apply exclusively to people, though! 「エンジンの具合を調【しら】べる」 ("Check the condition of the engine.") 「具合が悪【わる】いので休【やす】む」 ("I'm not feeling to good today so I'm gonna rest.") 気分【きぶん】 - Mood. 「仕事【しごと】をする気分になれない」 ("I can't get into the mood to do work.") 「今日【きょう】は気分がのらない」 ("I'm not in the mood ...



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