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7

「厳しい締切」 means "there is little time until the deadline", rather than "you must strictly meet this deadline." The antonym of this is 「緩【ゆる】い締切」, which is more like "there is much time until the deadline," than "rough/tentative deadline". If you need a word for "rough/tentative deadline", you can use 「一応の締切」「大体の締切」 or 「仮の締切」. For example, when you're inviting ...


0

締切 means usually the deadline for manuscripts and applications. I can't catch the word " soft deadline" in Japanese. If I say the sentence like " soft deadline" in Japanese, I say like 締切にうるさくない or 締切に厳しくない. 締切 don't be used in your example. I think 退出期限 is used in your example as the deadline.


2

厳しい締切 sounds too literal for my taste to be honest (it has more of a "tight deadline" feel to it than "hard") and 厳しくない締切 sounds even stranger. I suppose you are having difficulty finding a decent translation because culturally, a soft deadline is quite the oxymoron here (Dates and times are black and white here; If 2:00 is on time, 1:59 is early and 2:01 ...


3

The other answers do a reasonable job of breaking things down, but I wanted to make a comment on why 「かもしれません」 was added by a native speaker even though the version without it is perfectly grammatical. If you look at the final, full, sentence: 何を言っているのかわからないかもしれませんけど、今は日本語の練習をしてます。 The subject of 言う is pretty clearly "I" and the subject of わかる is ...


2

Let's break it down piece by piece: 何をいっているか → What are you saying? However, depending on the context, this can sound a bit to harsh or direct (Japanese people tend to avoid this). As you may know, adding the の makes this less direct and/or rhetorical. 何を言っているのか → What are you saying? (not expecting an answer; not so direct) Now, add in the ...


1

It's certainly not surprising that the sentence confuses you, it consists of a few grammatical parts, so let's break it down a little bit. 何【なに】を言【い】っているのか分【わ】からないかもしれませんけど 何【なに】を言【い】っている - looks like you understand this, it roughly translates to "What are you saying". However, in Japanese when we refer to an action such as this one, we want to use the ...


2

Checking against a this corpus reveals that 「きれいです」 occurs a lot more often than 「美しいです」: きれいです: 228 美しいです: 47 So, it seems that using 「きれい」occurs a lot more than 「美しい」 when being used in an XXX+です sentence. From personal experience, I would almost always use 「きれい」 or 「かわいい」 when commenting on an adult female before 「美しい」. This shouldn't be taken to ...


8

I think many people use the two forms freely without a difference in meaning, and I think your sentence is actually a good illustration that this is true. I don't think there's any detectable difference in meaning between 記入してください and 記入して下さい in your example. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if whoever wrote it didn't even notice they were writing it two ...


6

「日本」 means "Japan". 「来日」 means a "visit to Japan" said from the Japan side. "A visit to Japan" said from the visitor's country side, it is 「[訪日]{ほうにち}」. Here, 「来」 means "to come", not "next".


1

Basically, 撮る → take a photograph 写る → be in a photograph 写す → copy something down As @user3683045 mentioned, we also use 写す for photographing something.


5

ありがたい is used when something is convenient/beneficial/welcome to the speaker. And it's very often used with "if/もしも-clause" or 仮定形 conjucation. 論文を掲載していただければ、ありがたいです。 (before your article is reviewed) 教えてくれればありがたい(です)。(before someone actually teaches you something) And yes, sentences like these mean that your offer may or may not be accepted. (By ...



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