New answers tagged

1

This meaning is confusing because in English we really don't modify words like "this" in the same way. However, if you think of "僕のこれ" as a combination of "this" and "mine", it makes more sense. For example, imagine that the person is pointing to two objects so it is clear what "これ” means. I'd translate this as "Let's trade this, of yours, with this, of ...


1

In Japanese, one does not use "いる" to describe things that happen to be attached to living persons. You would use "ある" for body-parts, prosthetics, (internal) organs, clothing, hair, accessories, acne and makeup (although there are more appropriate words depending on what you are saying). The list goes on. The exception would be if whatever item you were ...


4

If I am placed in the situation you describe, I say "初めて会う人がいる or 初対面の人がいる". And I think we don't say "ああ 新しい顔があります!" or "ああ 新しい顔がいます!". It's the direct translation of an English saying. In addition, If the situation is in school, we call them 転入生 and 転校生. If the situation is in a company, we call them 新人.


7

There is also the word [分野]{ぶん・や} that means field/realm/sphere. Some examples 研究分野 → field of research 彼は物理学の分野でよく知られている → He is well-known in the field of physics 彼は彫刻の分野では第一人者だ → He is second to none in the world of sculpture. Also the suffix 〜[界]{かい}. 政界 → the political world 芸能界 → the entertainment world; show businesses 業界 → ...


4

There's 圏 as in e.g. 漢字文化圏(かんじぶんかけん) and 英語圏(えいごけん).


11

The most common word and character associated for this kind of usage is [圏]{けん}. Anglosphere would be [英語圏]{えいごけん}, and a common term to refer to the East Asian cultural sphere is [漢字文化圏]{かんじぶんかけん} which encompasses China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam.


2

I think 嬉しい男の子 is unnatural. 嬉しい is mainly used in oneself like 私は友達ができて 嬉しい and isn't used in modifying nouns. 幸せな男の子が図書館で勉強しました is natural.


7

嬉しい nowadays is mostly used to express your happiness during a certain moment or time, and it's usually brief periods of joy and related to a close event(either by speech or by time). For example, if you just got a package you waited for, you'll be 嬉しい. If you passed your test, you're going to be 嬉しい. 幸せ(な) is used to express long-term joy, or put more ...


4

「ないようがわからないかたは、おうちの人にがめんをみせてください。」 This sentence, while 100% grammatical, sounds kind of awkward, and I am sure that, as a fellow Japanese-speaker, you probably felt the same way. Even though it is a little awkward, it probably could not be improved much because it has been written to express something that the Japanese language is not designed well to ...


1

I think 好きな服装は何ですか? and 好きな服はなんですか? are correct and 好きなファッションは何ですか? is also ordinary used but 様式 isn't used in fashion. I think 様式 is formal. A dictionary say http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/jn/226436/meaning/m0u/ In addition, スタイル means mainly "a shape of a body" in Japan.


0

方【かた】 is a polite way of saying 人. From 大辞林 かた 【方】 一 [2] (名) (1) [...] (2) [...] 人を敬っていう語。「あの—は、よい—です」「男の—」 [...] So, ないようがわからないかた is saying ないようがわからない人, but politely.


1

While in daily conversation イスラム国 is often used, in media like NHK I never heard anything different than 過激派{かげきは}組織{そしき}イスラム国{こく}, i.e. ISIS seems to never be referred to using only イスラム国.


6

I'm not sure if it's the best way to refer to the group, which I think would depend on your motives, but my favorite journalist, [池上]{いけがみ}[彰]{あきら}, uses 「イスラム国{こく}」, and I think that's a pretty clear choice. You can also use 「[ISIL]{アイシル}」 (which is what the Japanese Wikipedia article uses). Since "ISIL" is an acronym, it is more opaque in that sense, and ...


1

In such cases, katakana センテンス is better, like 「英語のセンテンスには必ず本動詞がある。」, because 文 is ambiguous and can mean "a sentence" or "writings(文章)". Any good Japanese dictionary must have センテンス as an entry.


10

As you have correctly guessed, 文章 refers to a group of sentences/paragraphs. To refer to a single sentence, simply use 文, which is perfectly fine as a technical term, too. 一文 means "one sentence". It's used when one needs to emphasize "one".


7

進歩 is advancement to a higher/better/improved stage. Mainly used with scientific/technical ideas. 科学の進歩, コンピュータの進歩, 進歩したエンジン. 進行 is: progress to a advanced (often worse) stage: 癌の進行, 環境破壊が進行した progress of a plan, procedure, task, etc: 予定の進行, 結婚式の進行, 研究の進行状況 running/moving of a train, car, etc: 列車の進行, 進行方向の安全確認


4

文章を[直]{なお}してください is fine. You can also say 書いた文を[訂正]{ていせい}してください because 訂正 gets used a lot and implies that you gotta correct something. You don't use [正]{ただ}す, [訂]{てい}する in daily speech and [改]{あらた}める is used for intangible things like behavior or speech. PS for the Korean version look at the very bottom of this page. CLARIFICATION [訂正]{ていせい} means fix ...


1

the official translation of the map app on iOS is マップ, which leads me to think it's only used to denote a specific app whose NAME is マップ; but indeed, when referring to an actual map, and not the app that bares such name, they use 地図.


7

The far more versatile choice is 「[地図]{ちず}」; No question about it. I would say that an average native speaker would learn to use 「マップ」 a good 10 years after learning to use 「ちず」 as a toddler. In school, the word used is 「地図」 virtually 100% of the time and that is both in and outside of geography classes. In daily life, when you draw a simple map to show ...


-1

Katakana is mainly used in imported words and onomatopoetic words. The word "マップ" is a imported word so it is written katakana. I think the basic difference in usage is 地図 is mainly used in Japan and マップ is mainly used for foreign people because 地図 is Japanese and マップ is the reading and writing in Japanese for the English word "map". In addition, we eager ...


4

(Question 1) Buses in metropolitan areas are commonly (usually?) marked with numbers and letters. I don't know the statistical figure, but most buses have one number, possibly combined with one kanji or alphabet, followed by the destinations (eg. 茶51 秋葉原駅前, ②つくばセンター). Buses in rural areas may only have their destinations (eg. 湯涌温泉(行)). (Question 2) 番 ...


8

楽しい or 面白い can be used with various words which add a specific meaning and nuance to simple 楽しい or 面白い. So, how about using those words with it and creating various kinds of 楽しい / 面白い? For example, 本当に楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 最高に楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 いろいろ楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 なかなか楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 [久々]{ひさ・びさ}に楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 ...


1

As the OP says, both いまいち and 物足りない mean that something is lacking, or insufficient. However, いまいち doesn’t make a sentence by its own, while 物足りない makes a sentence if you add 何か, which can be interpreted as either a pronoun, something or adverb, somewhat, or a subjective word to it. いまいち is a shorter form of 今一つ, literally meaning “another one (required),” ...


3

I think it's along the lines of your idea of your Japanese not being as advanced as you'd like, and at the same time, it also has something to do with the words being common. Think about it: the only reason you can even pick out exactly which words you're using is because you have to think over everything you're about to say or write down for another ...


4

"ようこそ、いらっしゃいませ" and "ようこそ、お越しやす," its popular Kansai version are a set of phrases welcoming the guest. "ようこそ" is a variation of "よくこそ" meaning “true / indeed / rightly.” よくこそ is used in such way as; よくこそ言ってくれた - Indeed, you said exactly what I wish to say. よくこそここまで来た - Really (Thank God), we came a long way up to here. Though the phrase, “いらっしゃいませ – ...


1

いまいち or いまひとつ is "not very good", and 物足りない is "something is left to be desired". It might be true that in most situations you can use either one you can use the other one too, but I still don't dare say they have the same meaning. They're all about dissatisfaction towards the mentioned, and have nothing to do with the speaker's quality, or humbleness. ...


5

「それでも、[俺]{おれ}はその[繊細]{せんさい}な[声]{こえ}が[誰]{だれ}のものかすぐに[気]{き}づく。」 "Does もの here refer to a voice?" Yes, it does. If so, would there be any difference between the above and the following? 「それでも、俺はその繊細な声が誰の声かすぐに気づく。」 There is no difference in meaning, but as you stated, repeating the same word only a few syllables after using it once like in ...


1

"Oshimai" can be formal, but it is also used with small children. I would translate it as something like "We're done with that now" or "We're moving on" "Owari" has more of a feeling of finality, as in "We won't be coming back to this again" or "That time has passed." I agree with previous comments on the grammar of it all, but the connontation is ...


1

送る: To escort someone somewhere (and part from him/her after arriving there). Escorting itself is the main goal, and you usually have nothing do to at the destination place. 子どもを学校に送る 友人を駅まで送った (because it was late, and I said goodbye to him and returned home) 連れて行く: To take someone somewhere (in order to do something there with him/her). ...


4

There's no semantic difference, only stylistic one, as long as being used to write the word あこがれる. 憧 is the primary choice because this is the original kanji designated for the word. 憬 didn't have this reading until the word 憧憬 (しょうけい or どうけい) was coined, but you're allowed to use it in order to add some different flavor, too. As an aside, technically ...


6

The "dough" part of okonomiyaki is called (お好み焼きの)生地【きじ】. 生地 basically refers to the paste made by mixing flour and water. 生地 is also used for bread, doughnuts, pizza, udon, spaghetti, etc. According to Wikipedia: 水に溶いた小麦粉を生地として、野菜、肉、魚介類などを具材とし、鉄板の上で焼き上げ、ソース・マヨネーズ・青のり等の調味料をつけて食するもの Strictly speaking, 生地 only refers to the flour and water part. At ...


3

「[基本食材]{きほんしょくざい}」 or 「基本[材料]{ざいりょう}」 would do regardless of the dish. The word "dai" that you mentioned in the comment would be 「[台]{だい}」, which refers to the crust part of okonomiyaki, pizza, etc. Since you included cabbage, however, I would not use 「台」 for an answer to your question. 「台」 is just flour and water, basically.


0

"いくら" means "how much", while "いくつ" means "how many". This is the main difference between the two words. "どのくらい" means "(about) how much" and is very close in meaning to "いくら". The "か" particle on "いくら" and "いくつ" give them both the meaning "some". This, of course carries the meaning of some specific number of discrete things, for "いくつか" and a more analog ...


3

「[足利時代]{あしかがじだい}」 is just another name for 「[室町]{むろまち}時代」; There is no difference in what the two terms refer to. The former name exists because it was the 足利 family who were in control during that period (1336 - 1573). The latter is the usual name we learn in school in Japan. It is like calling 「[江戸]{えど}時代」 as 「[徳川]{とくがわ}時代」; The former is more common. ...


0

The difference between those 2 words could also be akin to the US-style 'washroom' (euphemism for toilet) and the direct term 'toilet'. For me, お手洗い could be broken down into to お手 (hands) & 洗い (wash) i.e. 'wash hands' in the washroom, i.e. euphemistically visit the toilet.


6

They are used in different contexts with different but overlapping meanings. 正方形 is a mathematical term for a square (a polygon with four sides of equal length and four angles of 90 degrees). 四角 is a daily-use word for a quadrilateral (a polygon with four sides), and we never use it in mathematics (unless it is part of a compound word). However, in the ...


4

四角 is a diagram which is framed in by four lines on flat, so oblong figure and trapezoid are 四角. 正方形 is a kind of 四角 and it's called "square" in English. It is framed in by four same lines and angles.


7

In my generation, トイレ is definitely the most common word refers to that facility, over any native word. お手洗い is also usually heard, but whoever says お手洗い in daily conversations would be judged being overly polite or really well-born. Nonetheless, we hear お手洗い more often than not because it's very popular in salesperson-ese, thus you're quite likely to run ...


7

トイレ is a shortened form of English “toilet” in Japanese. Both ‘お手洗い’ and ‘便所’ are Japanese language equivalents to toilet or lavatory. I think ‘トイレ’ is becoming more popular than ‘お手洗い’ and ‘便所’ these days. I think older generation, particularly females tend to use ‘お手洗い’ in the way ‘ちょっとお手洗いに行ってきます.’ 便所 is almost obsolete today. No one use 厠 – kawaya ...


10

For public toilets, I remember that the toilet signs at the 明治神宮 and several other 神社 say お手洗い, not トイレ. I think you'd have a hard time finding a toilet in a 神社 called トイレ. Similarly そば屋 usually use お手洗い. But I wouldn't be surprised to see a toilet in a そば屋 (especially in a cheap one) called トイレ. On the other hand, most デパート I've been to use トイレ, the same ...


5

Do you know what the basic verbs mean? [本]{ほん}をあげます。 means "I (will) give you (the) book" お[茶]{ちゃ}をいただきます。 means "Yes please", literally "I will gratefully accept some tea" So if you combine these with verbal phrases, they similarly mean "give" and "receive" -- almost opposite meanings. リサさんに道を[教]{おし}えてあげました means "I showed Lisa the way" (I gave ...


0

リサに道を見せてあげました means "I showed Lisa the road." リサに道を見せていただきました means "Lisa showed me the road." (polite form) So, it's total different.


4

以前に一度会ったことがあった/ある。To me, they seem to be saying the same thing, though I think the former is close to ‘I met him once before‘ with more emphasis on the fact and the latter is close to ‘I’ve met him once before’ with more emphasis on experience, if I venture to say the difference. I think ’一度会ったことがある’ is smoother and more natural than ’一度会ったことがあった.’ ...



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