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0

This seems to be a difference in conditionals (had to look up what subjunctive mood meant). たら has the nuance of "if he has said that". Extrapolating from that, the tone here is like: {if this has happened/X has done Y, then "something".} なら -> というなら here has the nuance of "if he says that". More generally, the tone is: {if this is the case/if things ...


2

Using 「戦{たたか}う」 is not totally impossible in that context, but you would need to know that it would sound like a pretty emphatic phrase that implies that your desire/tendency to think in stereotypes is realy strong. Your sentence at the end, however, would still be incorrect and ungrammatical. 「戦いにくい」 would not make much sense here. (You are trying to ...


3

The difference is minimal. They can be used interchangeably most of the time. The actual conceptual difference between 月曜 and 月曜日 is not so hard to understand, either. First you have to know that what 曜 exactly refers to is "planet" in astrology. Thus, 月曜 means "planet of Moon" and 月曜日 is "day of planet of Moon". So it's like we're actually calling it ...


0

As Haya8 said, [名前]{なまえ} means name in both written and speech. Polite way (not used for oneself): お名前 Ex. お名前は何ですか。 Common way: 名前 Ex. 私の名前は一郎です。 名 itself isn't used in speech. However, in written terms: It can be a counter for people. ~名 Ex. 5[名]{めい} means 5 persons. It can be a suffix of something. ~名 Ex. [会社名]{かいしゃめい} means Company Name


0

Only 曜 itself stands for day of the week, wherein 曜日 stand for the day of the week. So, there's not much of a big difference as such. Proper usage would be, in my opinion, 月曜日 because it completes the exact word.


1

You can just use 警官. I think this is very common to use. You could also use 刑事(さん), but this specifically means "detective", so it's not usable for every type of patrolman that you see.


5

A lot has changed, IMO one good way is to compare newspapers from the days. This one is from the Meiji era: http://www.geocities.jp/tanaka_kunitaka/takeshima/saninshimbun/02.gif This one from during WW2: http://userdisk.webry.biglobe.ne.jp/005/523/32/N000/000/000/123528635262516412541.jpg This is from 1960: ...


1

行く means "go", 出る means "leave, depart" and 出かける means "leave this place for some errand to do elsewhere". So 川へせんたくしに行く and 川へせんたくに出かける (as well as 川へせんたくしに出かける) make hardly any difference, but you wouldn't be likely to say 地獄{じごく}へ出かける unless you're something like "underworld detective".


3

In addition to @l'électeur's answer, we also commonly say 肩【かた】を組【く】む when two or more people put their arms on one another's shoulders.


4

Most commonly, we would say: 「(Person)の肩{かた}に腕{うで}をかける」 or 「(Person)の肩に腕を回{まわ}す」 I actually could not think of another phrase.


2

I don't know exactly why 船越義珍 used 修業 since 修行 would also make sense. But since he did, I think the quote should only be considered correct the way you stated it: 空手の修業は一生である。 Firstly, since you probably don't know, 修 is often pronounced しゅう (shū, long U), but in both 修業 and 修行, it may be pronounced しゅ (shu, short U), so there are three words, しゅぎょう ...


5

修行 is primarily used for (endless/lifelong) religious discipline; it's something Buddhist monks or priests do every day. Note that this kanji 行 (gyō) on its own means 'religious training/discipline/practice', as in 行者 (gyōja, person who does 修行, especially that of 修験道), 滝行 (takigyō, waterfall meditation), 苦行 (kugyō, hard discipline), etc. You can also use 修行 ...


1

The word 修業 is used for something you can complete/graduate/master. This is why we use 卒業 to express a graduation from something. I think we never use 卒行 in this situation. At least I have never seen 卒行 in my life. On the other hand, the word 修行 is used for something you can not complete. Thus, when you say Karate is a lifelong pursuit. 修行 does fit ...


0

From what I can see on jisho.org: 修業{しゅうぎょう} is pursuit of knowledge; studying; learning; training; completing a course 修行{しゅぎょう} is training; practice; discipline; study. From the definitions I would imagine that no, they are don't mean the exact same thing on their own, but perhaps in context as Erakk said, they might be able to be used interchangeably. ...


0

I am a novice in this language, but i can say that, basically: 業 means "act" or "deed" 行 means "to go" or simply "go" So, depending on the context/the way the phrase is formed, it could be used interchangeably. Any more experienced can correct me if im wrong.


1

To keep it simple, 送る means to send something while 連れて行く means to take something or someone with you. I would say that 連れて行く Involves another person while 送る doesn't do it by itself


1

まねをする means to mimic someone's movement. ふりをする means to behave as if you are that person, or disguise yourself as that person.


1

You can make a polite negative version of a noun or na-adj by either adding 「です」 to 「ない」 (making 「ないです」) or saying 「ではありません / じゃありません」. Examples: 「静かではありません。」 「静かじゃありません。」 「静かじゃないです。」


1

It means you can either use ではありません or じゃありません to express a negative polite phrase. So, 私は医者ではありません and 私は医者じゃありません are both fine.


3

送りします You don't say 「送りします」. It's お送りします(or お送りする in the plain form) or 送ります(or 送る in the plain form). お送りします(お送りする) is the humble form of 送ります(送る). 毋はびょういんへつれて行ってくれました If you mean "My mom took me to the hospital", you could say: 母が/は(私を)[病院]{びょういん}まで/に送ってくれました。 送ってくれた would mean your mom took you to the hospital and left you there. ...


7

While in ordinary speech we use 論 as a suffix roughly means "theory on ~; argument for ~", in most of academic fields those ideas are conveyed by 理論 e.g. ひも理論 "string theory", 最適性理論 "optimality theory" or プロスペクト理論 "prospect theory" etc. (except for mathematics, where they seem to use 論 to translate the term "theory"). In academia, the suffix 学 is used to ...


2

I'd recommend you to ignore that explanation, because the writer doesn't really seem to understand what は・が are for. (Especially about the bold parts) First, が denotes the subject in a clause. 東から日が昇ること a fact that the sun rises in the east 象が鼻が長いこと a fact that elephants have a long trunk When you turn it into a sentence of statement (in other words, ...


2

Think of it in terms of the English counterparts and it'll all make sense: 連れる to take someone/thing along with you, and do an action together. お送りする to take/send someone/thing to do something (nuance: you don't do the action). Examples: 犬を連れて散歩する. To take a dog on a walk with you. お母さんを空港まで送った(お送りした)。 To take your mum to the airport. So to go back ...


2

「手を出す」has several meanings and it depends on the situation it is used. 「手を出す」 けんかをする(暴力を振るう) some sexual meanings.. touch or interact (ex: 「Facebookに手を出す」) 手をさし出す(show someones hand) (ex: 「アメをあげるから、手を出して」(Want candys? Show me your hand.)) 女性の場合は「子供に手をあげる」(子供をたたく、あるいは、暴力を振るう)などの表現も使います。 「手を出さない」 けんかをしない(暴力を振るわない) some sexual meanings.. will not touch ...


3

So-called である form isn't what you should put である in the end of every sentence. である only replace copula だ/です (and its conjugations), and other endings just remain as plain form. So when you change your style into である form from です form, you'll do: したいです → したい したいと思っています → したいと思っている したいのです → したいのである


2

I'll take a stab at it. I would say not really. Since you say you have a long name and your friends call you ナッちゃん, that's already a short form of your name and using that to refer to yourself may make you appear childish (as mostly young females refer to themselves in third person, unless you're going for that young person vibe). Stuff like ナは今帰る sounds ...


1

As @naruto's answer already gives one of the best solutions based on your principle, I'd just like to show an example what I would naturally say it in Japanese, for your reference: おかげで、帰りの車の中でまでニヤニヤしてたもん。 Apparently it's too hot today to explain how I've transformed your original English into mine.


3

The present tense of 「お花しおれてっちゃった」 is 「お花しおれてっちゃう」. Let me put 「ちゃった」 or 「ちゃう」 part aside for now, please. So I can give you a clearer explanation of why the heroine chose the word 「~ていく」(「~てっ」 form in this sentence) instead of 「~てきた」 here. By the way, this「〜てっ」 means 「〜ていって」 as you translated. And I think that this 「〜ていって」 is 「〜ていく」+「て」. So, my ...


1

Maybe the most commonly heard words are 体を温める食べ物 and 体を冷やす食べ物. When I googled about them, the great majority of the results were related to the concept in traditional Chinese medicine. There seems to be two streams of technical terms on them. This page uses 寒性 (cold), 涼性 (cool), 平性 (neutral), 温性 (warm), and 熱性 (hot), while this page, 陽性 (yang) and 陰性 (yin). ...


2

The linked article says 'heaty' is yang = 陽 and 'cooling' is yin = 陰. That led me to some Japanese articles discussing 陰 (or 陰性【いんせい】) and 陽 (or 陽性【ようせい】) of foods. 食べ物の陰陽 人間の陰陽による食物の選び方 Apparently these articles are introducing the same thing as the linked article, but Japanese people are generally not familiar with such a concept. (And I also feel that ...


4

I agree that the normal wording for this situation is, as you suggested, お花しおれちゃった (if the flower had completely withered away when the girl saw it), or お花しおれてきちゃった (if the flower was still withering). And you are not the only one who thought this sentence was strange. There's a question in Yahoo! 知恵袋 discussing this line: ...


3

If you need to explicitly include everything — "to home", "to return/go back" and "to drive" — you have to say "運転して家に帰る途中". But 家に is usually obvious, and can be omitted. ニコニコする in this context sounds a bit funny to me. The common and handy word for this is 思い出し笑い, and the most common mimesis of 思い出し笑い is ニヤニヤ, not ニコニコ. ニヤニヤ is used both when ...


1

お花しおれてっちゃった Would mean the flowers are already しおれている. E.g. if you say 霧が晴れてっちゃった, it's not foggy anymore. お花しおれてきちゃった Would mean they are beginning to しおれる but are still relatively fresh. E.g. if you say 霧が晴れてきちゃった, it's still foggy. Presumably in the heroine's mind, the flowers were already しおれている enough. Note that the ちゃった expresses ...


-1

I am not good at english just think about casually yourself Japanese people are called manners important virtue . It expresses in words . i think you knows, two expressions of differences to the through next view ==== VIEW ==== WHEN USING kudasai CASE, (when ordering your friends; a close acquaintanceship ) SIMILAR expression in enligsh : Water please ...


3

Choices two and four are out immediately because they both essentially mean "the moment ~ happens / as soon as ~", and the translation would not even make sense. As soon as I lost the election, I'll likely never return to the political world/scene. Both clauses make sense, but put together like that just makes a nonsense statement. Now choices ...


1

If you are talking about interjections, then "ほれ" is a variant of "ほら" mainly used by males to mean "look!", "here you are", etc.


3

Thanks to @choco's research it's clear that the original right answers are both どこ. Thus if you've been taught as かいしゃはなんですか? here, something wrong must have happened between the original text and you. So, Could it be wrong with "nan"? Definitely. なん(なに) is only used when you ask about its quality. What you want to know by "What is your country?" ...


3

I don't know wether this is grammatically correct or not, but I would never say it, but I think : 日本語を好きになる Sounds very natural, even though it doesn't really mean : 日本語が好きだ


4

The difference is that "suki" is an adjectival-noun (the set of nouns which are closer in meaning to our adjectives, but function grammatically more like nouns). It stands in place of the English "to like", which is a verb -- hence the confusion. If it helps, try thinking about "suki" as meaning "an enjoyable-to-Subject thing" rather than "I like [x]".


-1

"なん" <- "何{なに}" which means "what." "どこ" means "where." Thus "かいしゃは なん ですか。" means "what/which company are you working for?" whereas "かいしゃは どこ ですか。" means "where is the company you are working for located?" But I would say どちら (の会{かい}社{しゃ}) に お勤{つと}めですか?" to mean "what/which company are you working for?"


10

When I hear: 「面白いマンガ」 「面白い冗談・ジョーク」 「面白いことを言う」 「面白い芸人」「面白い顔」「面白い服装」 I would normally think the 面白い is used as "funny", "comical", "makes you laugh", or maybe "queer", etc. When I hear: 「このゲーム/本/映画、面白かったよ。」 「(テレビで)今日、何か面白い番組やってる?」 「ディズニーランドとユニバーサルスタジオジャパンのどっちが面白い?」 「俺と勝負しろ!」--「面白い。相手になってやろう。」 「ドイツ語の勉強は面白いです。」「大学の勉強、面白い?」 ...


-1

What is the "feeling" a Japanese person gets upon hearing the word 面白い -> 日本人が「面白い」という言葉を聞いて得る"感覚"は何ですか? I think Japanese is a very interesting language. -> 日本語 が/は 興{きょう}味{み}深{ぶか}い言語であると私は 思います/考えます。 FYI, Oxford English Dictionary says "interesting = arousing curiosity or interest; holding or catching the attention." * added * 面白い can mean ...


1

I would say that there is a clear difference in nuance and usage. Careful speakers would not use the two interchangeably -- at least not all the time. 「文句{もんく}を言{い}う」 sounds pretty neutral and accordingly, it is used widely. The phrase itself expresses no personal bias on the part of the speaker unless other words are added that can express it. ...


1

"受{うけ}付{つけ}" usually means "receptionist." And we usually say "店{てん}員{いん}" for general (= not necessarily administrative) "shop clerk." While "筆店" makes sense to mean "brush shop" as in -> arimahude.com, many Japanese brush shops seem to prefer calling themselves "筆{ふで}専{せん}門{もん}店{てん}" as in -> fudeya-shop.comor , or more fancy(?) "筆 セレクトショップ" and the ...


3

ダンス(dansu) is a Loanword from English. A word borrowed from English into Japanese (Anglicism, English Garaigo). Derived from the English word "Dance". ダンス is more used to refer foreign dance styles as Waltz, Hip-Hop, Ballet. 踊り(odori) is the traditional native japanese word with same meaning. An inflexion of the word "踊る(odoru)" meaning "to dance". 踊り is ...


2

Using まめ is correct in the context of getting a blister on your sole. 水疱 and 水ぶくれ have same meaning, but the former one is academic term. 火ぶくれ is only used for it caused by burns.


4

Saying 死亡者がいる is not bad. いる is used for someone/something seems to be able to have own will, so you can use いる for a person, an animal, and even if for a robot. If your subject is 死体 (dead body), saying 死体がある is correct. 死亡者が出る is not mistake, but 犠牲者{ぎせいしゃ}が出る is more naturally. Use carefully 犠牲者, it means implicitly that the victims are already dead ...


1

I understand that 信用 implies trustworthiness based on the past, whereas 信頼 implies confidence or reliance on some person/thing for the future.


7

There is actually a difference between the two. 「鼻{はな}の頭{あたま}」 can only refer to the "physical" tip of one's nose -- nothing more. It has a highly limited meaning. 「鼻先{はなさき}」 can refer exactly to what 「鼻の頭」 does and something extra. It can also refer to the (empty) space right in front of one's nose, eyes, face and even one's body. Thus, you can have ...



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