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6

奇術【きじゅつ】: Illusion or stage magic, which has tricks and is performed by real magicians all over the world. A person who does this is called マジシャン or 奇術師. But in this sense, the most common word is katakana マジック. Table magic is often called 手品【てじな】, too. 魔法【まほう】: Supernatural kind of magic. Typical 魔法 is what you can find in Harry Potter franchise or various ...


0

"記{き}す" and "記{しる}す" are almost same, but "記{しる}す" include a bit nuance of "explanation". "記{き}す" means "note down something". 碑文に記{き}されているところによれば From sentence written on the tombstone another exmaple: 手順{てじゅん}を忘{わす}れないようにノートに記{き}す。


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Only in negative sentences, 「[二度]{にど}と」, not「二度」, can mean "again". 「マクドナルドへは二度と[行]{い}かない!」= "I'll never go to McDonald's again!" In affirmative sentences, 「二度」 always means "twice". 「二度と」 cannot be used in affirmative sentences. 「日本に二度行ったことがあります。」= "I have been to Japan twice." 「[再]{ふたた}び」 means "again" in any situation. 「[去年]{きょねん}再び日本に行った。」 means ...


4

The nuance of 好きではない depends largely on the context and the tone of the speaker's voice. People often use 好きではない when they actually hate something/someone, because 嫌い is a very strong and offensive word. Someone who says 嫌い too often is someone who is disliked by others. 好きではない can act as an euphemistic expression, so to say. 苦手【にがて】だ (be not good at ~) is ...


1

As @dotnetN00b mentions in the comments, in general, the difference is between dislike and hate. Of course in some instances, individual interpretation may have an effect on how one chooses to use each word and what context to use them. A basic and non-complete comparison of the words (as I understand them) is below. 大好き > Love / Really Like 好き ...


3

Both 揃う and 集める include objects or living being coming together at one location, but there's an important difference: 集(め・ま)る is more or less a neutral collection 揃う on the other hand includes a connotation of the collection being sufficient or complete  You can 集める the pieces of a puzzle and end up with 1000 out of 1500, with 500 missing; but if the ...


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揃う is used when all the members of a certain group/family/section get together. When used for inanimate objects, it means that everything that composes a certain larger thing gets together. 揃った? Is everyone here? 部品が揃った All the pieces (of a machine, etc) are prepared. You can use 全員(が) or すべて(が) with 揃う, but it's usually optional and doesn't ...


0

My previous link about tonari was lost. So I'm going to post another link I found here as an answer for completeness. Source: Japanese Words and Their Uses Tonari is used especially when two objects of more or less the same category are in question. When two objects belong to two entirely different categories, tonari is not appropriate. Examples (1) and ...


3

As @l'électeur asked, what is the context? It could mean This is a Video, isn't it? It could also mean This is a video as if introducing some long lost technology. It could also show some kind of small astonishment like having found a video where they were expecting something else Oh! A video! When addressing something you are confident is a ...


3

In my expererience and from some research I did for an essay back in University, this stems as a large part of the "Westernisation" of Japanese words in the lead up to and immediately following the 1964 Tokyo Olympics in preparation for the influx of foreigners that were expected as well as a slight difference in meanings. JR (Then JNR) changed all it's ...


3

As a beginner, you would not need to know any of the three words if you want to know the truth. Seriously, you would clearly need to know at least a few thousand other words already to use any one of those three correctly and naturally in a sentence. Above is my answer in all honesty, but in case you insist... 「租借」 is the leasing of a territory between ...


3

碑文に記されているところによれば Without furigana, I would read this as 碑文にしるされているところによれば without hesitation. 記【しる】す is already a stiff word, which is suitable for the inscription on the tombstone. 記【き】する is very uncommon and sounds even stiffer to me. Probably there is no meaningful semantic difference from 記【しる】す. (Of course, there are many common compounds using 記, ...


4

What foregin word is マスカット derived from? As already pointed out in the comment section, the word is derived from "muscat", a type of grape. What is the most commonly used word in Japanese for green grape? The usual word for "green grape" (precisely in this generality) is 白ブドウ. Is マスカット an accurate translation for green grape? In Japan, マスカット ...


0

This is a bit late but hopefully it will be useful to others. I was just discussing this question with a native Japanese speaker (who is also a language teacher). Here's what he said: 林 (はやし): A small collection of trees. A small wood, a copse or a bunch of bushes. 森 (もり): A large wood/a small forest. This one is also meant to conjure up images of bigger, ...


4

Both 時間帯 and タイムゾーン work, and both are very common ways to speak about time zones. But one thing you should know is that 時間帯 also describes the specific period of time in a day. Say, 朝の時間帯 means "the morning time" and used in this way it doesn't describes time zones. In short, if it is clear your sentence is talking about time zones, you can use either, but ...


3

Adding to the other answers and regarding the phrase あつい水, I'd like note this is possible in certain contexts. An article on Tokyo Language Center: 誤用?「熱い水」 「地球の環境」がテーマの番組で、深海を探査するシーンで「摂氏200度をこえる熱い水がふきだしている」というフレーズが聞こえてきました。 このシーンでは「摂氏200度をこえるお湯」はそぐわないんですね。なんか科学的な雰囲気が壊れてしまい、「温泉でのんびり」という感じになってしまいそうで・・・ ...


2

It seems I get to talk about this fairly often here.... Forget the kanji for a minute and "listen" to the three words. Which one sounds "most Japanese" to you? To rephrase the question, which one sounds "least Chinese-like"? That would be the word that is most intuitive to the native speakers. That is the one we will use most often because it is the one ...


1

To make it simple, both are correct, you might find 母語話者, in books, newspaper, any written document although not very used. 母語話者 is the real japanese word who existed before ネイティブ was imported in japanese from english. ネイティブ is the most used word , which is a contraction from ネイティブスピーカー, which is comming from the english ネイティブ In japanese you have ...


0

To help you understand those words I will give you few examples : 地区 : Those are districts/wards in a city, there are for example 23 special wards in Tokyo. ( Shinjuku, Shibuya etc ...) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_wards_of_Tokyo You will say 新宿区 (the ward of shinjuku) 渋谷区(the ward of shibuya). In every japanese city you have 地区 地方 is a region ...


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I think ネイティブ (without スピーカー), is the most common word used by ordinary Japanese people. To me 母語話者 sounds too technical in ordinary conversations and casual writings. ネイティブ is considered exactly the same as ネイティブスピーカー by ordinary Japanese. To them, ネイティブ is ネイティブスピーカー, nothing else. Thus ネイティブスピーカー is far less frequently used in conversations because it's ...


5

Conclusion first, neither term is particularly common. Ironically, however, places like this (SE) are not very good to discuss the matter. Why not? Because the Japanese-speakers who are on here, myself included, are already at least bilingual to an extent and, in general, they would tend to be more interested in foreign languages or "Language" in general ...


1

This probably falls into the category of words that have become more popular in the katakana form compared to the kanji form. If you are talking about the difference in meaning then there is none as far as I can tell from usage. If you are talking about difference in terms of when you should be using which word, I would suggest that the younger generation ...


6

出席 means “to attend to something” whilst 参加 means “to (participate into/actively take part in) something”. For example you can attend (出席) a meeting, without saying your opinion (参加). 会議に出席はしても、意見は述べない 参加 instead is – like you described well in your example – for really taking part. You could also take a look here: Link Global Solutions Inc., ...


1

yes, the sense is different: -爆発しないといい you express your hope, you hope that it won't happen -爆発しないとよくなる doesn't make much sense with this verb, but you simply state that something good will come out of not doing an action. There is no notion of hope


3

First of all, "食べないとダメ" means "you have to eat," not meaning "食べないとだめになる." In this topic's context, "いい" is used when you describe your hope or wish. For example, "爆発しないといいな" means "I hope it won't explode."


5

Not sure if you are expected to write like a native speaker in this assignment, but "as a native speaker" is the only way I could correct your writing. First off, I would surely drop 「私は」. Everyone who reads this will know exactly who you are talking about. I would use 「[昨年]{さくねん}」 instead of 「去年」 as the latter would sound slightly too informal or ...


2

This introduction sounds fine. As self-introduction for university/work, it is common in Japan to talk about personal stuff like your hobbies, your family ...etc so maybe you can add this. For some of your questions : "I graduated in X" > X年に卒業しました "I want to go for the master program" > 今後の勉強(活動)としてBar大学の修士課程を目指しています 専攻分野 is more specifc for field of ...


1

Many countries/cultural groups already have a predefined ~語 in Japanese, アラビヤ語, セルビア語, for example. 言葉 is the all-purpose word for "words" and "language" ... the kanji do it justice as "leaves of talk" 言語 actually leans more toward "linguistics" 言語学 or "the study of language" 言葉は水だ "language is liquid" or "language is water" ... I don't think it would ...


1

あなた (or あんた) is in my experience used almost exclusively by females, so you should probably avoid it. You would use 君 mostly to adress people who are inferior in status to you (generally because they are younger) and whom you do not know very well. With close friends, おまえ is completely acceptable (usual, even), but you can also use 君 to add a somewhat warmer ...


2

I would go for omitting the pronoun or using the person's name (with whatever honorific you'd usually use). It may be difficult for an English speaker to get used to doing so, but it is perfectly acceptable in casual conversation.


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Your first set of three sentences without 「は」 used in them could mean two very different things. This represents one of the soft spots of informal Japanese today. 1) "I am being unable do it (today) as good as I usually do." Today is an exception. 2) "As usual, I could not do it (today)." Today is no exception. By adding 「は」 as you did in your ...


1

I have the feeling that even いつも通りに(は)出来ない risk being misinterpreted as meaning "I always cannot", and the phrase does not ring well to my ears. First, bear in mind that the particle は in itself can express "exception", as in 今日はできません, where it's naturally interpreted this way. To emphasize on this particular occasion being an exception to the ordinary, I'd ...


4

二人の忍 will simply mean "two ninja" or "a couple of ninja" as in "there are a couple of ninja out there." If you emphasize the two ninja as a team, who always act together, then try 忍【しのび】の二人【ふたり】組【ぐみ】. This one is neutral, which doesn't sound foreign nor old. Alternatively, 双忍【そうにん】 is not a word listed in dictionaries, but it's actually used to refer to a ...


-1

The solution is simple: use honorifics. 尊敬語{そんけいご} means I'm talking about you, and only you. 謙譲語{けんじょうご} means I'm talking about me, and only me. Consider honorifics to be more "pronoun avoidance" rather than expression of "respect" or "humility". そちら as a second person pronoun


0

A pair or couple of Shinobi would most often be translated as "忍びの二人", pronounced "shinobi no futari" and literally "two people of ninja" or "couple of ninja". Sounds ridiculous in english because Japanese doesn't often make distinctions between plural and singular forms.


0

Oftentimes I come across this particular way of adjusting/mutating iku to yuku when talking about background/weather events. It would not be wrong to put "iku" in its stead, but "yuku" is almost like a "and so the rug goes on, being pulled out from under our feet" as opposed to "there he goes pulling the rug out" One would also say "yuku" for the ...


7

One more addition on あなた. The word is also used by wives to call their husbands (something like dear in English), so just use the person's name, with さん, くん or ちゃん. Depending on the company, everybody may be using nicknames for each other as well. I really do not hear or use the second person pronouns often, or even at all.


9

I would stay away from お前 and 君, unless you know very well what you are doing. あんた is a bit less formal, but still not super-friendly. Actually, the two most simple ways to address friends casually are: No pronoun: whether in a formal or casual context, you only really use a pronoun when there might be an ambiguity otherwise. The person's name is also ...


12

There are several you can use instead: あんた → Basically a familiar version of あなた. [君]{きみ} → Sounds a little more endearing to me, but that may not always be the case お[前]{まえ} → Very informal. Can be considered rude and/or derogatory depending on the context in which you use it and how well you know the person. Lastly, it's very common not to use the ...


2

Not so strong in Japanese yet, but wouldn't simple 頑張って (がんばって) do, in this case?


1

Well, as for the phrases I cited in the comment: よろしくおねがいします* "Thank you for everything in advance." / よろしく** / よろ*** おつかれさまです* "Thank you for everything." / おつかれ** / おつ*** はじめまして* "Nice to meet you." どうも** "Hi" (but with slightly inactive impression) / ども*** items marked an * are the polite full wordings. ** are more colloquial lighter ...


5

The easiest and most commonly-used structure for expressing: "come/go/return, etc. + in + (time period) " would be to use particle 「で」 and say: 「(time period) + で + [来]{き}ます/[行]{い}きます/[戻]{もど}ります, etc.」 This would by far be the most versatile way of expressing "in (a time period)" Other expressions: 「(time period) + [後]{ご}に + (verb phrase)」 ...


3

In your first translation, I believe you used かい as translation for English "time". But かい(kanji 回) means time as in the first time, many times. Equivalent to German "Mal". So for the first one, let's drop the かい. 5分あとで行きます。 This is a fairly understandable sentence, but not natural enough. When expressing in five minutes, it's more usual to say 5分ご than ...


1

yes, if you translate it to English they have very similar meanings. Assuming that you knew in Japanese there are formal and informal terms, chotto is informal and generally only used in speech.


2

(sorry, not enough reputation to comment) I agree with l'électeur, you will and most of the time can be interpreted from the context. If you want to be specific "He went outside without taking his card" << action caused by him 彼はカードを持たないで外に出ていた。 "He went outside without the card on him" << a condition 彼はカードがない状態で外に出ていた。


5

You should be able to tell from the context nearly 100% of the time. On the rare chance that it is difficult to tell, it would generally be of little importance which way you interpret it. Off hand, I could not think of such an example. 「[武器]{ぶき}を[持]{も}った[乗っ取り犯]{のっとりはん}たちは[乗客]{じょうきゃく}をりつ[然]{ぜん}とさせた。」 In this sentence, the vast majority of ...



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