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0

As the above says, 干す is usually used for things that are left out in the sun to dry, such as laundry or foods, as in 干し柿 or 干しいか. 乾かす is more of a general term that doesn't necessarily involve dessication, and usually involves taking action to do the drying, e.g. drying one's hair, drying laundry in a drying machine, wiping tears from someone's face, etc. ...


2

干す and 乾かす are transitive and 乾く is intransitive. 乾かす is a general word for 'to dry' and 干す is to dry by hanging or in the sunshine.


1

Counters for days also use Japanese numerals, from 2 to 10: ふつか, みっか, よっか... . 20th also uses a native counter: はつか. Some day numbers use mixed counters (14, 24): じゅうよっか, にじゅうよっか.


4

You have a couple choices: 頭が痛い   (not ×頭が痛いだ) 頭痛がする I basically agree with Szymon's answer that 頭が痛い is more colloquial and all-around more common. You can use either phrase, though. (You can make it more colloquial yet by omitting the particle が.) Adding だ to adjectives like 痛い is nonstandard. To make these more polite, use 頭が痛いです or 頭痛がします.


5

I think the colloquial way (and most common way) is: 頭が痛い。 Or even more colloquially dropping が: 頭痛いよ。 Please note that 痛い is an i-adjective so 「頭が痛いだ。」 is not correct. This can be used for other body parts too. I think that the confusion is because in English there are words for some of the "aches" which you often use, like "headache" or ...


2

Yes. Grammatically you can say 「ない」. This forms a complete sentence, which means "(it is / that kind of stuff is) not (t)here". However, this works only for physical existence or possession. In most cases, even when a question ends in ない?, a simple 「ない」 is not a grammatically correct answer. Like when asked 「あしたあそばない?」, the answer could be「あそばない」 but ...


5

So, some of these words have much narrower meaning than hospitality in general. To me, 「親切{しんせつ}」 sounds like the most neutral word for hospitality. A natural sentence would be 「ご親切{しんせつ}に、ありがとうございました。」 Both 「(お)もてなし」 and 「歓待{かんたい}」are specifically the hospitality towards guests. 「お世話{せわ}になりました」 is for something longer (but, it seems most cases of ...


5

The more common the phrases are, either in English or Japanese, the less likely it is that direct or literal translations will sound natural in the other language. "Thank you for your hospitality" is a prime example of this. All of the three words that you listed are "big" --- especially 「歓待」 and 「厚情」. Those two are seldom used in spoken language and when ...


4

「おもてなし」 is probably closest to hospitality. You can say 「持て成し」 but it's probably more common to say 「おもてなし」. When you thank someone, I don't think you have to mention their hospitality; instead, it's perfectly fine to say 「ありがとうございました」 or 「お世話になりました」. 「おもてなしありがとうございます。」 is literally "thank you for your hospitality", but this sounds very awkward.


2

Conveniently, the 類語例解辞典 groups three of these together in one heading and adds the other in a note at the end. Here's what its 使い分け section has to say on the matter: 「または」は、二つのもののうちの一方を捨てて一方だけをとる場合や、どちらでもよいという許容を表わす場合に用いる。 または is used for cases where there are two choices and whatever is not selected will be cast aside. In these cases, the person ...


0

事【じ】 is a matter, so 大事【だいじ】means a "serious matter". 大【たい】した places less emphasis on the "matter" and more on being "big", so can simply mean "very" or "much". As an example 国家安全保障【こっかあんぜんほしょう】の大事【だいじ】 - a matter of national security and 彼女【かのじょ】は大【たい】した歌手【かしゅ】になるはず - she will definitely become a (very big) singer As per their negative ...


-1

それは一般的です Is more like, "that is commonplace." While it's not incorrect, I'd say something along the lines of このモバイル・デバイス上のタグ実装手法はごく普通のである。 ごく普通 = fairly common/normal or このモバイル・デバイス上のタグ実装手法は非常に平凡のである。 非常に平凡 = extremely common/standard Although extremely standard is a bit of an oxymoron.


1

I would say it means "That is typical." Or 'That's not uncommon." As with most short Japanese sentences like that, to make a translation into English, it depends on what kind of context is surrounding it.


6

This is a good example of a pair of words that would seem interchangeable if "translated" as both are often just translated to "to hate". 「嫌う」 and 「嫌がる」 are only "casually" interchangeable but not strictly so. The key word is 「がる」, not the big kanji 「嫌」. For instance, you can hate your husband without anyone knowing it, including your husband. To keep it ...


6

There is no difference in meaning between 「[一旦]{いったん}~~」 and 「~~が[最後]{さいご}」. You can use either of the two or even both together to say: "Once someone does A, he will always (or never) do B." or "Once A happens, there certainly will come situation B." In other words, it expresses an automatic and/or uncontrollable result. I will use your ...


5

That is 100% 「ほう」, not 「かた」. When 「方」 is read 「かた」, it is a very polite and respectful way of saying "a person". Look carefully at the words used in that sentence, such as 「[奴]{やつ} = a derogatory "dude"」、「[見]{み}ちまう = the tough guy's way of saying 見てしまう」、「できねえ = the tough guy's できない」, etc. There is no chance that a word like [方]{かた} could be used with ...


6

The first sentence 「ジュースなりコーラなり、お[好]{す}きなものをどうぞ。」 is perfectly natural. It is asking you to choose whatever you want to drink and "juice" and "cola" are only two examples of what is available. Point is you have other choices as well. The second sentence is different. By using 「か」, the speaker is giving the addressee two choices only --- "juice" and ...


0

知る is basically used for the new knowledge or idea or thoughts...something new. When you 知る something, it means that you didn't know it before. So, 知った implies that you just heard or seen something new for you, not necessarily means that you understood it. Whereas 分かる is not used only for the new things but also something you've already heard or seen. When ...


0

To understand the difference, you need to know where 分かる comes from. Pun intended. わかる is the intransitive form of 分ける, meaning "to separate". If I 分ける something, I divide it out, but if I わかる something, the dividing would be done in me. Another way of translating it would be "parsing out an idea from all the rest". In the case of the scenario about knowing ...


2

[対岸]{たいがん}の[火事]{かじ} Fire on the opposite shore. This is the same expression in Japanese. Sources: Japanese person.


-1

Here try this and tell me if you like it. 食べてみて。。。。 You don't have to eat it but at least try it. 食べなくていいし、ちょっと味だけ見て。 (Thanks Chocolate) I like spicy food so I really want to try taka-no-tsume. 食べてみたい You can't say you don't like tequila if you never even tried a good one! いいテキーラを飲んでみたことがないから。。。 Did you ever try scuba diving? ...


0

Adding just a bit more to Mr. Kawaguchi's answer, I think that 家を出る is usually heard in a situation where someone (a teenager, a spouse) leaves the home where they are "supposed to be", often under not good circumstances (running away from home, domestic violence, imminent divorce, ...). C.f. 家出 In this case, the situation is about a presumably unmarried ...


-4

very roughly speaking, すみません=excuse me and ごめんなさい= i'm sorry


2

My sense could be wrong, and I'm sure I'll be told if it is so, but I don't think those words (with one exception) are useful for what you want as in "to try": 味わう = literally to taste the flavor of something as in while you are cooking 嘗める = to lick something -- also a term for when someone is trying to mess with you. 試す = to test something 味見 = to taste ...


10

I think the most universal way of expressing trying is using て-form of a verb followed by みる. For example: 電話してみるよ。 I will try calling you. お好み焼きを食べてみたい。 I want to try eating okonomiyaki. In addition, what you can express in English as "try" as in "have you tried?" is sometimes asking about past experience and can be expressed in Japanese as ...


1

When I was in college one of my professors taught us a basic principle for telling when to use each: 分からない: I don't know (generic, but with a sense that it's pertinent to the speaker) 知らない: I don't know, and I have no reason to (not relevant to the speaker)


7

This is a good example of where direct or literal translation does not work well between Japanese and another language. We often use 「どう」 where English-speakers would use nothing but "what". 「どうしよう。」 or 「どうしたらいいの。」 vs. "What should I do?" 「どうしましたか。」 vs. "What happened?" If you used 「なに」 instead of 「どう」 in the phrases above, you would sound more ...


2

Overall your sense is on the mark. A good way to view the example in Genki is along the lines of "How [are you spending] your winter vacation?", as opposed to the looser translation they provide.


2

出来る is the potential form (〜えます form, if you will) of する. As such, in common usage the best practice is to use the native potential form for all non-する verbs and できる for the rest. Proper construction of the potential form is as follows: Type I (〜う) verbs: Change -u to -eる (e.g. 行く => 行ける). This ending can also be further inflected (e.g. 行けます、行けない, etc.) ...


2

Short answer: 得{え}る or うる is more literary. ことができる is slightly more formal than られる and both fit for everyday use. ことができる and られる can only be used to describe humans' ability so they don't fit well with non-volitional verbs (無意志動詞). える or うる can also be used to describe possibility. E.g. ×あられる ○あり得る Both ことができる and られる can be used when you are not ...


3

から is really only used to designate the location/point/time from which things start, whereas を is a rather generic particle. Because of this, から makes the reader mentally picture a time range (今夜から明日にかけて雪になります), a motion (東京から大阪へは3時間かかります), a coverage (揺りかごから墓場まで), etc. In contrast, を just doesn't have this sense of motion/breadth/width. And so when this ...


2

As already mentioned, "ohiya" is originally a jargon used only inside sushi restaurants to mean "cold drinking water poured in a yunomi (cup)". Another word categorized in this class is "agari", meaning "hot green tea". While the use of "agari" is still limited to sushi restaurants (and I personally never use it), the word "ohiya" is now very widely used ...


6

「状況が直った」 sounds kind of informal and depending on who you are speaking to, it could sound a little bit unadultlike. How about a 「状況が[改善]{かいぜん}した or された」? 「余計な」 would sound too colloquial here. I would use 「[不要]{ふよう}な」 or 「[不必要]{ふひつよう}な」. 「抜く」 also sounds conversational. You might go with 「[削除]{さくじょ}する」 Examples: 「不要な行を削除したところ、状況が改善した。」 ...


8

Often the particle は is written "wa" in Latin letters, because は, when used as a particle, is in fact pronounced the same as わ. Of course, は, when it is not a particle, is usually pronounced "ha". を is pronounced お, and therefore sometimes transcribed "wo" and sometimes "o". Similarly, the particle へ is pronounced the same as え, whence "he" or "e". For ...


12

When being used as a grammatical particle ([助詞]{じょし}), は is pronounced わ (wa), を is pronounced お (o), and へ (which you may not have come across yet) is pronounced え (e). I've never used Rosetta Stone but it seems quite strange that it would not mention this... Information as to the historical reason for this difference between spelling and pronunciation ...



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