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11

As always, "translated words" can often get in the way of understanding the words in the context of their original language. You would need to "forget" for a moment the word "easy". That is just too easy a definition. There is some interchangeability between the two words, especially in more informal speech, but there actually exists a difference in ...


7

You cannot 持っていく to mean bringing someone somewhere. It's only used when talking about objects, hence the literal meaning "hold and go". If you want to say "to take someone somewhere", you should either some form of 連れる{つれる}, like 連れていく, or 送る. Keep in mind though that 連れていく is only for bringing people of lower status. 毎日学校に妹を連れていく


6

Yes, this example sentence is natural. 人間【にんげん】 can be used, as well as 人【ひと】, when one shows their hatred against someone, or when one wants to keep a distance from someone. 私はあの人が好きです。: OK 私はあの人が嫌いです。: OK 私はあの人間が好きです。: Weird 私はあの人間が嫌いです。: OK To me, #4 sounds even more hostile than #2. Likewise, 「彼はそういう人です。(That's how he is.)」 can be ...


6

In casual speech, you might say: A: 「なのか」ってどういう意味? B: どっちの「なのか」?「なのか、ようか」(とか(言うとき))の「なのか」?(それとも、)「なのですか」って意味の「なのか」? If you want to sound politer you might say: A: 「なのか」はどういう意味ですか? B: どっち(orどちら)の「なのか」ですか?「なのか、ようか」(など)の「なのか」ですか、それとも「なのですか」という意味の「なのか」ですか?


6

Informally, I would suggest 「みたいな」 or even just 「の」. One can say: 「みっか、よっか」みたいな「なのか」? 「みっか、よっか」の「なのか」?


5

Firstly, for the overlapping meaning of "real situation", 「[実態]{じったい}」 is used far more often than 「[実際]{じっさい}」. Importantly, this is just about the only meaning 「実態」 is used for. e.g. 「ショービジネスの実態」、「[山口組]{やまぐちぐみ}の実態」, etc. (山口組 is the largest yakuza organization.) Very few people would use 「実際」 to say those in reality. Secondly, 「実際」 has another ...


5

An difference between them is that [怪]{あや}しい is near to spoken language and [疑]{うたが}わしい is near to written language in my feeling. Of cource both 怪しい and 疑わしい can be used in both spoken / written language though. Examples Here are some examples of non-swappable case. Example 1 In ordinary conversation, OK: あの男の人、[怪]{あや}しいよね。 (That man looks suspicious, ...


5

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you're trying to say something like Please feel free to contact me again. Maybe? From your choice of 僕, I'm guessing this is not necessarily an overly formal context. お好きに is not used like that. (Did you get this from お好きにどうぞ?) Depending on context and tone, もしよかったら or お気軽に or いつでも might be usable, although I ...


4

I think it's one verbal phrase とり続けにとる. Repeating the same verb using the "VにV" pattern (e.g. 笑いに笑う, 泣きに泣く, 食べに食べて飲みに飲む) is one way to emphasize the verb. It describes something is done intensively for a long time. 現代日本語の同一動詞反復表現「VにV」について 古典 文法 格助詞 に (see the last section) So if the phrase in question were "半日相撲をとりにとったら", the sentence would be very ...


3

When my American husband tried using でござる in speech among college-age Japanese friends for fun after reading the Rurouni Kenshin manga, back when he was learning Japanese in the early 2000s, they were baffled and told him to stop. You could toss it out once or twice as a joke, but no: though you could be grammatically-correct in using it, it's not considered ...


3

Yes (and no). People frequently use でございます in very polite speech, and nobody would find it strange to hear it used in such a context. Given that it's used frequently in polite situations, though, it will usually take the polite ます form. That is to say I think that it would be much less common to hear someone use でござる in its plain form. でござる is typical speech ...


3

家の~ or 私の~ is basically the same thing with the former stressing on that its yours. You can see it as if the stress is on one's own. You can use it even in the context when the object does not belong to your family. Like 家の会社 or 家の上長{じょうちょう}. Consider 家の as something is member of one's (whatever group) you want to refer to.


3

In Danish, there are different words for neighbor, depending on the location of his/her place in relation to yours. For example, the word for neighbor living across the street is different from the word for neighbor living just next house. We have these words in Japanese, too; the neighbor living next door is お[隣]{とな}り(さん) or 隣りの人, across the street is ...


3

A Japanese thesaurus has an entry. In short, 信用 means that you believe them not to lie to you, and 信頼 that you trust them to work as you expected. These are often but other aspects of the same matter, but for example, a clever lawyer might be 信用できないが信頼できる to the client, and your nice but incompetent friend is 信用できるが信頼できない to you. Unfortunately, Google ...


3

What is the definition of 取り続ける (if that is indeed the word used), and how does it differ from 続ける? Or should I perhaps treat it as 取って続ける? 続ける is a 補助動詞 here, which attaches to another verb to make it mean "continue to V" (see here). And 取る is the verb we use for "fight wrestling", so effectively 相撲を取る equals to "to wrestle (a bout)". Is ...


3

警備員 and ガードマン are both common, while the former sounds a bit more formal, and the latter is commonly used in conversations. I don't think ガードマン is less respectful at least in Japanese. 守衛 is not the most common word. Strictly speaking, 警備員 and 守衛 are legally different (see the third question in this page). 警備員 is the official name of a certain profession ...


2

Overall: 簡単(な) means "simple" 易し(い) means "easy" 簡単(な) means "simple" rather than easy. For instance, simplified Chinese characters are known as 簡体字 (simplified characters) using the first kanji of this compound. Simple is an excellent English translation for the word, and it meets the meaning and feeling of the word well. 易しい is firstly an ...


2

影響する 影響を与える 影響を及ぼす 影響する is grammatically different from the other two; it is one verb, and cannot be modified by the dictionary form of an adjective like よい ("よい影響する" is wrong). "父親は彼によく影響する" is grammatically correct, but it sounds more like "to affect strongly" rather than "to have a good effect/influence". 影響を与える and 影響を及ぼす are semantically ...


2

You're replacing a verb with a verb, so there's not much that could have gone wrong. In other words, your construction is fine. You said you wanted to end up with "I write, therefore I am" and then chose a verb that doesn't mean "to write", so obviously 我作る、ゆえに我あり doesn't mean "I write, therefore I am", but something more along the lines of "I make, ...


2

according to the link you posted (http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/thsrs/3345/m0u/) 疑わしい only means that the information is uncertain/doubtful. 怪しい means that the uncertainty/doubt is a bad thing. If i had to put it in simple terms 疑わしい would be 'doubtful', while 怪しい would be 'suspicious'. As background, it's being used to describe an ad that had a ...


2

「中」(ちゅう) is an 音読み (onyomi) so it is used in multi-kanji compound words and words that do not end in hiragana (途中 [tochuu], 午前中 [gozenchuu], 中心 [chuushin], 中途半端 [chuutohanpa]). 「中」(なか) can be a stand-alone word in a sentence. However, it can also be used in combinations (仲良し [nakayoshi], 仲直り [nakanaori], 真夜中 [mayonaka]), place names (中野区 [Nakano-ku], 中川区 ...


2

I may be wrong, sorry for that. But I think that 中{なか} can be used by itself. For example: 猫{ねこ}は部屋{へや}の中{なか}にいます。 - Cat is in a room. (lit. Cat exists in a room.) Whereas 中{ちゅう} can't be used by itself but must be a part of a word. For example: 中{ちゅう}学{がく}生{せい} - Middle school student. I think that's it. By the way: 中{なか} is kun-reading, and 中{ちゅう} - ...


2

First of all, yes it is perfectly fine to say おかえりなさい to a colleague coming back from somewhere. Second, a female colleague saying おかえりなさいませ is likely kidding by imitating the overly elaborate manner of speaking in Maid cafes or such, which makes him laugh. However, another possibility is the female colleague simply being very polite.


2

When you are talking about turn on light, you should say つける. [電気]{でんき}をつける。 [電気]{でんき} is the common way to say electricity lighting, by the way. つける also can apply to any kind of stuffs. エアコンをつける。 (Turn on the air conditioner.) テレビをつける。 (Turn on the TV.) パソコンをつける。 (Turn on the PC.) [電源]{でんげん}をつける。 (Turn on the power.) 入{い}れる is sometimes ...


2

I am not a linguist, so I may be wrong, but... 損害 and 被害 both mean "damage", "loss." But 被害 is something caused by somebody else or something that is beyond control, while 損害 includes damage and loss caused by oneself or something under one's control. Example: 地震による被害   damage caused by the earthquake 株取引による損害  loss generated in stock trading You can ...


2

明日から、問題が有れば、私に話す前に、まずメールで会話の内容を送信します。お願いします。 I won't be able to understand what you mean. Do you mean something like 明日から、問題があれば直接私に話しかける前に、まずメールで内容を教えてください ?


2

明日から、問題が有れば、私に話す前に、まずメールで会話の内容を送信します。お願いします。 Generally okay, but a few things that do look and sound unnatural. For starters, not many people write 有る with kanji. It's not wrong, but considering its rarity most Japanese people would pick up on that, and a few will even ask you why you're using 有れば rather than あれば. Also, your usage of commas is a bit ...


2

Compared with 何かしらの手を…, using は conveys a sense of "at least".


2

It is not that it can't be used with nouns. It cannot be used with anything that is inanimate. Thus, since a picture is inanimate, 絵画たち would be ungrammatical. You should just use 絵画 regardless if it's just one or many. There won't be misunderstandings if the number isn't important, and if it is important, you should specify it, even if the number is general ...


2

I would still use 「[上]{あ}がる」 even if I moved to a basement or tepee tomorrow. I cannot speak for other Japanese-speakers but I myself do not really think of "going up" when I say 「[家]{いえ}に上がる」 even though the floor of my home is over 40 centimeters (two steps!) higher than the "genkan" = "entrance". If I used 「家に[入]{はい}る」, I would feel as if I were a thief ...



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