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12

This is a nice cultural question. 「[座]{すわ}る」 originally means "to sit on the floor or ground". 「[腰掛]{こしか}ける」 means "to sit on a chair or something that has a certain height". Nowadays, it is perfectly OK to use 座る when sitting on a chair, too, as in 「イスに座る = "to sit on a chair"」. Older people still use the word (noun) 「腰かけ」 instead of 「イス」 to refer to ...


11

Here is how I and many other native speakers use the two words in real life. I am answering without looking at anything. 「静かさ」 describes the bare physical degree of how "not loud" a thing is. Quietness, while it may be desired, is not a prerequisite here. Examples: 「静かさ」 is used to talk about how quiet a car, airconditioner, street, person, etc. is. ...


9

The single most natural verb choice among us native speakers is: [聞]{き}く (sometimes written as 訊く) 「聞きたいことがあるんだけど、いい?」 = "Can I ask you a question?" More literally, "There is something I want to ask, OK?" 「ひとつ聞いてもいい?」 = "Can I ask you a question?" (Literally.) 「[何]{なん}でも[聞]{き}いて。」 = "Ask me anything!" 「尋ねる」, though some J-learners use ...


8

I think the correct form in standard Japanese is [来]{く}ればよかったのに, since Wiki says 仮定形 of 来る is くれ. I think こればよかったのに is a typo or an error. Maybe the person who wrote this uses a regional dialect and typed これば (unconsciously or carelessly?), and it was not converted into kanji so they just left it as it was.


8

It all depends on the content of your most recent correspondence. If the other person has answered an important question that you had asked previously, you can use 「(ご)[回答]{かいとう}ありがとうございます。」 as 「回答」 means "an answer to a question". I used the word "important" because something like "How are you?" is not one of the questions I am talking about here. ...


7

First, I will talk about how to use 「[励]{はげ}む」 and later on, other possible expressions. Both 「[勉強]{べんきょう}に励む」 and 「[勉学]{べんがく}に励む」 sound natural with the latter being more formal or "adult-speaker-like". Next, how to combine 励む with other verbs. You used 「励ます」, which is a transitive verb meaning "to encourage someone to do something". You cannot use ...


7

法律 is the general word for "law", as in 「法律を守る」(obey the law),「法律で禁止されている」(forbidden by law) or 「渡辺法律事務所」(Watanabe Law Firm). I believe that the most common use of 法度【はっと】 is to mean "something that is terribly bad manners", and that it's almost always used with ご in front — 「ご法度」. A quick Web search found: 新郎・新婦の恋愛遍歴話はご法度:結婚式でゲストがやってはいけない非常識な行動 ...


7

[北極星]{ほっきょくせい} is the word you hear and see to refer to the North Star basically 100% of the time in present-day Japan. That is the word you learn in school as a kid and use the rest of your life. [北辰]{ほくしん} is seen mostly in company names and such. I could not speak for other Japanese-speakers but I could say that the word 北辰 is basically non-existent in ...


7

Answering the question without looking at anything.... Let us start with 「バーゲン」 because it is the simpler of the two in terms of meaning and usage. Quite simply, it means "a store-wide clearance sale" in retail. It is a considerably larger event than a 「セール」, which may be limited to certain sections or items in the store. We have another common word ...


6

To match the tone of "woe" and the slightly older sounding English of the original, why not? 沼地に近寄る者に災いあれ Your それらのための災いは誰が沼に行きます Is, I'm sorry to say, mostly nonsensical: "disasters for the benefit of those, who goes to the swamp?"


5

Answer I'm a native speaker and I'm sure that there's no difference between them. It's a evidence for it that Japanese government uses 外人 on its public document. Reference It's said that 外人(さん) should not be used because few people feel discriminated when Japanese call them 外人. Thus, especially on public document (e.g. TV programs), 外国人 are used ...


5

There is no one particular Japanese word that you can use everytime you want to use "almost" in English contexts. "I almost fell down." = 「もう[少]{すこ}しで[転]{ころ}ぶところだった。」 That would be by far the most natural Japanese sentence. Native speakers would almost never say 「ほとんど転んだ。」 unless they were trying to sound humorous. You, as a learner, could end up ...


4

The former (明日は…) is an answer to a question "What day is tomorrow?" while the latter (明日が…) is that to "When is Tuesday?". Edit: "Topic" stands for imformation that's suggested in the preceding context, so when we see 明日は…, we can imagine some contexts that include "明日" e.g. "明日は何曜日?". On the other hand, 明日が火曜日 is inversion of 火曜日は明日, and we can think of ...


4

Basically, yes they have the same meaning, but normally the company decides which word they use in each case, and a customer or business partner shouldn't use the words interchangeably: If they call themselves as "XX担当" then you call them that way, too. 担当 is treated as a person (even if there were more than one person in charge), so you use 様, not 御中. ...


4

Tenses generally do not correspond well between English and Japanese. Japanese-speakers usually just use the present tense to talk about near future events and we could always tell from the context. Natural-sounding Japanese sentences for "You will not feel good if you eat such food." would be:  「そんなもの[食]{た}べてると[元気]{げんき}になれないよ。」  ...


3

[裏切]{うら・ぎ}り is just the noun form of the verb [裏切]{うら・ぎ}る. So to describe a backstabbing person (backstabber), you can just say [裏切]{うら・ぎ}る(者{もの}・人{ひと}). Although there is also the special compound noun [裏切]{うら・ぎ}り者{もの} for the same meaning. There's a slight usage nuance that I can't quite put into words, but it's not so big that it's something to worry ...


3

I think there is no difference in politeness, register, gender, etc., between the two. "Welcome to X" on the welcome signs for tourists are more commonly written as "ようこそXへ". This is a well-known idiom; if I saw "ようこそ日本に" at Narita Airport, I would feel it's a bit unnatural. However, I feel 「Xへようこそ」 and 「Xにようこそ」 are completely interchangeable, when X is ...


3

After some research about this topic, I've found that "(神の)救いの恵み" is very frequently used by Japanese Christians. So this seems to be the exact phrase you need. 旧約新約聖書講解―神の救いの恵みを学ぶための 救いの恵みと祝福 救いの恵みに今応答しよう 神の救いの恵み 亀戸教会 - 牧師より 主 イエスの救いの恵み に応答する第一歩は、礼拝に参加すること、祈ること、聖書を読むことです。礼拝は祈りです。キリストの御名を通して、あなたの祈りが神さまに聞かれています。 And looks like "saving grace" is used ...


3

I have found something that might be useful from poking around in the etymological information I have to hand. Shogakukan notes in their entry for 静{しず}か that the noun form is 静かさ. There is no separate entry for 静かさ。 When looking to see if there was an entry for 静けさ, I found an entry instead for 静けし, which lists a noun form of 静けさ. 静{しず}けし appears to be ...


3

As a Christian who worked at a Japanese church, I can say that イエス様の救う恵み and 救うイエス様の恵み are both fine, although the latter is somewhat ambiguous in parsing, i.e., it could be parsed as either 救う(イエス様の恵み) → Jesus' grace that saves. OR (救うイエス様)の恵み → The grace of Jesus, who saves. To disambiguate it, you could add in a その 救うそのイエス様の恵み ...


3

For an expression like this (a kind of 専門用語)there is likely to be a commonly used phrase you won't be able to come up with from scratch, and the majority of people have to look it up. I found this on the internet: saving grace of God | 神の加護 I expect you could use it for Jesus too.


3

There is virtually no difference in meaning but there is a slight difference in nuance, therefore, in actual usage. Using 「どのような批判があろう + が」 could make you sound a bit more defensive and/or excited about your own opinion being presented than when using 「どのような批判があろう + と」. The latter would help show your composure as an author better than the former. Without ...


3

First, 法律 is more commonly used in spoken and written Japanese than 法度 is. You can verify this notion by how the two words appear in a Google search, with 404 million for the first and 930,000 for the second. Also, ほうりつ when entered in an input bridge will immediately convert to 法律, whereas はっと will likely convert to Katakana, and only with further keyboard ...


3

They have the same meaning of "dangerous", but 危うい is used more in the written language (文語), whereas 危ない is used more in the spoken language (口語). Here's a Chiebukuro question asking about this. 大辞林 has a note in the entry for 危ない ...


3

I am not sure if those are used as separate words other than as parts of the words ディスカウントストア and バーゲンセール. Even if they are, I think the meaning carries over the meaning of these more common words, so that ディスカウント implies things sold at low price regularly at particular stores while バーゲン implies a temporal sale at any kind of a store.


2

危ない is "dangerous" while 危うい is "vulnerable" or "not reliable".


2

You're a little mixed up about the English grammar and its equivalence in Japanese; "saving" is not present progressive, but a participle adjective. イエス様の救い would be enough I think, though you could make it "fancier" if you like.


2

First of all, there's only one modern polite word to call a foreigner and it is 外国人. There are other phrases too, such as 海外の人 or 海外の方. The latter one is used more often. However, you mostly hear 外国人 when a politician talks from a tribune or an overly politically correct Japanese person tries to be polite. In fact the normal way to refer to a foreigner is ...


2

Even though I am not entirely sure what exactly you are trying to ask, I will somehow manage to talk about the things that I feel might be of interest to Japanesse-learners. With Japanese signs --- any signs really, including those asking you not to do something --- things happen that do not happen with signs in other languages. That is regarding how the ...


2

返事 = a reply 回答 = an answer 返る = to come back 答える = to answer If you want to thank someone for answering your question, use 「回答」. If you want to thank someone for replying to your communication, use 「返事」.



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