Hot answers tagged

11

馬鹿 vs 阿呆 is an interesting theme on linguistic geography. In fact it's once been thoroughly investigated by a TV program, followed by academia. Here is the full map of local vocabulary for "fool/idiot". (from this page) In a very simplified way you can say あほ is prevalent in Kansai, たわけ in Greater Nagoya or Chubu, だら in some Japan Sea coastal areas, ばか ...


9

Your sentence: 「[Name]さんは[仕事]{しごと}でよく[忙]{いそが}しいんですか?」 is strange because 「よく」 is most naturally used to modify verbs, and not adjectives like 「忙しい」.   Thus, 「よく忙しい」 sounds just very strange to the Japanese ears as our ears are not used to hearing such word combinations. In other words, if you literally translated the English sentence "~~ is often ...


7

1) 「またしても、[政治家]{せいじか}の[金]{かね}に[関]{かん}する[問題]{もんだい}が[明]{あき}らかになった。」 2) 「[強]{つよ}すぎる[冷暖房]{れいだんぼう}は[体]{からだ}に[良]{よ}くないし、またしても、[環境]{かんきょう}にも[悪]{わる}い。」 「またしても」 is an emphatic way of saying 「また」("again"). To use it correctly, you must have a situation where the same or a similar event has occured once again. In addition, 「またしても」 is usually, if not always, ...


6

Answers will differ depending on one's Sprachgefühl (no joke intended), but I would personally opt to use 「[言語感覚]{げんごかんかく}」 over 「[語感]{ごかん}」 anytime. The reason is that while only people can have 「言語感覚」 while both people and words can have 「語感」. In fact, 「語感」 is far more often used to refer to the feeling of a word than a person's sense for a word. Thus, ...


5

It is difficult to give a precise answer to this question. In cases where the speaker has a choice between "da" and just ending the sentence, both have their own nuances. Omission may be more "feminine" and addition of da might be more "masculine". In some cases, da can be used for emphasis. Usage patterns vary by gender, age, social situation, and ...


5

The past tense of 居る{いる} (iru) is not いった (itta), but いた (ita); thus, the past tense of these words are not pronounced exactly the same. 「いった」has a slight stop before the t sound (making the t sound a little lengthened), whereas「いた」does not.


5

If you wanted a translation that used a verb phrase in the active voice form, the easiest one that actually nicely captures the nuance of the original would be: "Thank you for coming into the/this world." I personally would not bother with any forms of the verb "to bear" in this case.


4

「~~そうもない」 and 「~~ようがない」 are vastly different from each other in meaning and usage, and there is absolutely no interchangeability between the two. 「Verb in [連用形]{れんようけい} + そうもない」 = "to not look like (action described by the verb) is happening (any time soon)" Describes "no-indication" situations. whereas 「Verb in 連用形 + ようがない」 = "There ...


4

Here are the first 10 hits for 片方の手 in BCCWJ Corpus: As you can see, and as goldhick "answered" as a comment, 片方の手 tends to be used when it is contrasted with the other hand. (ie, "One hand ~, the other hand ~") 片手 is simpler; "one hand", "one-handed", etc. When you say 片手で運転する, what the other hand is doing is not important. Another example: 岩を片手で持ち上げた ...


4

またしても and the related またまた can be translated as "once again" which makes these two examples clear on the usage. 1/ またしても、政治家の金に関する問題が明らかになった。 Once again, problems involving politician's money has come to light. <-- correct 2/ 強すぎる冷暖房は体に良くないし、またしても、環境にも悪い。 Not only is over-powered air conditioning not good for your body, once again (??), it is ...


4

When talking directly to your teachers, you can almost always stick to ~先生 and be safe, regardless of their positions (教授, 講師, 助教, ...). In general, ~教授 is used only when referring to them in the third person. This is in contrast to private companies, where 部長 can be called (X-)部長, etc. But depending on the university you visit, there may be rare local ...


3

活動 is a habitual activity, eg hobby, routine, club activities, or even limited-time sustained effort (eg 就職活動 = job hunt) 行動 is a more generic one-shot behavior or action 仕草 is more about the way you carry yourself, mannerisms, motions, etc. 作用 ~ not much experience with this one, but I believe it is a process, eg a scientific or biological process.


3

The natural choice is おちついて. おさまって sounds grandiose and even funny, unless you were saying this to a furious god rather than school kids. Basically, when we want to say "calm down" out aloud to someone, おさまれ/おさまって is almost never used, except for by stereotyped samurais, fictional chunibyo characters and such. 収まる is relatively more literary, and tends to ...


3

Not in the slightest. When you say そうか 'sou ka', you are saying something like 'I see' or 'Is that so?' You have understood what the other party is saying. When you say そうかな, you say something like 'I doubt that' or 'Really?' You are casting doubt on the other party's claims.


3

Kind of, but there's controversy and we ourselves don't know what it exactly is either. Since shinto myth is a mystified form of our ancestor's history, it's probably a place in north Kyushu. It's of course not a place above the sky where you go after death.


3

「[日本]{にほん}の[輸出]{ゆしゅつ}をストップさせるために、[円高]{えんだか}が[進行]{しんこう}していたからである。」 I think I know why you do not think this sentence makes sense. (The sentence makes perfect sense, I assure you.) 「~~からである」 indeed expresses the reason for a result (or the cause of an effect), but you are looking for the description of the result/effect within that one sentence, are you ...


3

片方の手 would refer to one hand (physically speaking) 片手(で)is used in the sense of doing something with one hand (one wouldn't say 片方の手で自転車乗りました (I rode my bicycle with one hand))


3

The verb you need is 空【あ】ける. 左側に間を空ける 両側に間を空ける 間をする makes no sense.


2

しようがない means "no way to do" and しそうにない means "unlikely to do". I think only しようがない is natural in sentence② because the speaker say "I have no choice but to accept it" in the following sentence, so "no way to decline" is natural.


2

「朝、起きる」という生活習慣が身についてこそ、次の行為へとつながっていくのだ。 Only when you acquire/learn the habit of getting up early, the next step will follow. 「朝、起きる」という生活習慣が身についたからこそ、次の行為へとつながったのだ。(or つながっていったのだ。)。Only because he acquired/learned the habit of getting up early, his next step followed.


2

Japanese Wikipedia literally translates this noun as 平等【びょうどう】結婚 (source), and some Japanese sites introduces 結婚の平等, 婚姻の平等, etc. I think all of these are valid possibilities you can use, while 結婚の平等 seems to be the most prevailing, according to Google. But whichever you choose, you have to explain what it means first, because vast majority of Japanese ...


2

Generally 天国 refers to the Christian heaven (while 地獄 can refer to both, the Christian and Buddhism hell). Both words are frequently used in everyday language (「天国だね」、「地獄行き」). 高天原 refers to the 神道 concept and is not really used in everyday language.


2

Their difference is subtle, especially in everyday conversation where they only differ in nuances rather than "real" meaning. But you can say that かな is more "interaction-oriented" because of the な which is cognate with ね. You can compare the dictionary definitions of か and かな: 〔か〕質問や疑問の意を表す。 〔かな〕念を押したり、心配したりする気持ちを込めた疑問の意を表す。 〔か〕引用した句の意味やある事実を確かめ、...


2

My ballot for 「絶対語感{ぜったいごかん}」. It's not a translation of "Sprachgefühl" but a variation on the Japanese word 「絶対音感{ぜったいおんかん} (absolute pitch) 」, which names the ability to intuitively recognize and reproduce a given musical note. So 「絶対語感」 and "Sprachgefühl" may not line up directly, but, I think they are pretty much doppelgängers of each other, at least ...


2

Similar questions have been asked before, although they may not answer your question completely. Anyway, please read them first: proper usage of 出かける Using 出る as opposed to 出かける Now you understand the cases where 出かける is absolutely wrong. If you won't go back, or if you go to somewhere against your will, 出かける cannot be used. But in your example, the ...


2

老いる is a little bookish way to say "to age". The most common phrase now to say growing old is 年を取る. 老ける isn't really "grow old", but describing people become "older" than they really are, that is, they've got weary, out of blood, or lost youthfulness, often suggesting that they had a hard time. In its participle-like forms 老けている or 老けた it means "look old".


1

“だ-da” is a colloquial form of a predicate, "です" - used in both written and spoken form and "である" - used mostly in written form. “だ” also can be replaced with “だよ,” which sounds softer than “だ.” The feminine version of “だよ” is "だわ" and “だわよ” that you often hear from woman speakers. You say 今日は暑い(ね), but should never say "今日は暑いだ" and "暑いだね." It’s odd and ...


1

Just to clarify「先」really is only used for future reference and not for past reference. There are examples that will take on that meaning such as, 先{さき}の天皇陛下{てんのうへいか}は裕仁様{ひろひとさま} The previous emperor was Emperor Hirohito But, just to be clear, it may be worth learning for understanding ,but is rarely used in every day life. This is the way it is ...


1

先 can talk about the past or future and has a great many other meanings related to its fundamental meaning of something a bit like "fore", "head", or "tip". さっき only talks about something in the (very) near past, and is very close to さきほど in meaning. 前 can talk about any time period in the past -- near or far. Not sure if that's enough detail, but looking ...


1

Yes that から denotes a reason. 「AはBからである」 is "The reason of A is B", "A because B", etc. 眠いのは遅くまでテレビを見ていたからだ。 (You are/I am/etc) sleepy because (I/you/etc) stayed up late watching TV. 空が青いのは太陽光が空気によって散乱されるからです。 The sky is blue because the sunlight is scattered by the air. (The の before は is the nominalizer.) If the first part ("Aは") is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible