Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Your choice of Romanization will depend on your target audience. In my opinion, your absolute safest bet is to go with strict Hepburn style. If it's for Japanese people, feel free to use kunrei. This is what Japanese people learn when they are kids, and many write their names that way. They learn Hepburn in English classes in junior high school. If it's ...


9

Quick answer: ずっと - sustained over long period of time いつも - every time, all the time, etc. Examples: ずっと東京に住んでいます。 (I've lived in Tokyo for a long time.) 東京に出張するときは、いつも「帝国ホテル」に泊まっています。 (I always stay at the Imperial Hotel when I have a business trip to Tokyo.) Hope that helps!


8

You don't have to katakana-ize the names of programming languages or softwares. Here is an article about popular programming languages, written in Japanese. And this may be off-topic, but the word コーダ- (coder) is often considered lower than プログラマー (programmer) at least in Japanese. コーダー implies a lower-grade, inexperienced person who only writes programming ...


7

急に is like suddenly I think, this word includes the meanings of without notice or unexpected. すぐに is immediately, as you mentioned. The context describes the baby's general habit, so must be expected things. the answer is 3.すぐに.


7

The difference has to do with how the clothing is put on. [着]{き}る is for clothing that's hung from your shoulders, such as a shirt or jacket. It's also used for whole-body outfits, or any combination of clothes that includes something worn this way (eg Tシャツとジーンズを着る, even though only Tシャツ is valid with 着る). [履]{は}く is for clothing that's pulled up from ...


6

I think there is almost no difference in their meanings, and the two phrases are almost always interchangeable. I said almost because I can not think of even a single counter example in a few minutes as a native speaker. By the way, you can also use a verb, '計画する', without 'を' in a similar way. For example, 旅行の計画を立てる。 旅行の計画をする。 are similar to ...


5

天気 (1-3 days): You'll hear 天気 used the most, as in 天気予報 weather forecast or 天気はいいですか Is the weather good today? You should almost always translate 天気 as "weather" in English. 天候 (2-10 days): 天候 refers to the overall state of the atmosphere between a few days to about 10 days. Its use isn't that common, however, in casual conversation it shows up in the ...


5

I think 学際 is the only standard translation of interdisciplinary (at least according to the dictionary). Although it is easy to imagine what 超域 means, this word is unfamiliar to me at least as a name of an academic field. And apparently there are very few Japanese university departments with 超域 in their names. I feel there is no meaningful difference ...


4

According to the article from "トクする日本語" by NHK, 人 is used when you just count the number of people whereas 名 is more used in a formal expression or when there is a fixed number. 「人{にん}」=【単純{たんじゅん}に人数{にんずう}を数{かぞ}える場合{ばあい}】、「名{めい}」=【改{あらた}まった表現{ひょうげん}をする場合{ばあい}、定員{ていいん}・定数{ていすう}のある場合{ばあい}】とまとめることができそうです Therefore, restaurants wouldn't ask you ...


4

Both exactly means "interdiscipline(-ary)" here. Japanese vocabulary doesn't have a word that can translate "discipline", you can only refer to it by saying "academic field" 学問分野 or "specialized field" 専門分野 etc. Thus if you want to make a two-part compound like "inter" + "discipline", you have to think of a workaround. 学際{がくさい} is a solution based on the ...


4

This is the descriptive answer. Google hits A word of warning about google hits. They are not accurate. Google tries everything to reduce computation time and costs, and it will not give you an accurate full-text search of the entire (public) net. Try going to page 20 or 30, and Google informs you it cannot provide any more results. Furthermore, a search ...


4

You can only use なったら, not なると. First, take a look at this topic, and you see how they exactly describe the difference of と and たら. と, ば: The main clause must be a constant non-volitional reaction to the conditional clause unless the conditional clause shows state or if the subjects of the two clauses differ. ~たら 1. Use when expressing a one-off ...


4

Is しかねる valid for politely giving this type of "excuse" for why you can't do something? 出来かねる or 致しかねる is better. and I think, it's better not to mention about the detailed reason. Can できない also be used for politely giving this type of "excuse" for why you can't do something? (e.g., "電話で対応できませんが…") Yes. If neither of these are ...


3

天気 This is the most common word for weather, and expresses a naive concept of the entire perceptive state of sky (and air) in some place at some moment. It includes sunshine, cloudage, precipitation, wind, humidity and temperature, but not likely air pressure. By at some moment I mean, this word is expected to state an overall impression at a certain ...


2

To use the dictionary, you need to de-inflect them. Both are given in past tense in the problem but you need them in the present "dictionary"-form to look them up: [通]{とお}した is the past tense of [通]{とお}す [通]{つう}じた is the past tense of [通]{つう}じる 通す -> to persist, to make way for 通じる -> best definition = to convey or communicate Given these definitions, ...


1

Interesting discussion. It has been a while since I lived in the land of the rising sun (1973-79). My language skills (although greatly deteriorated with age:-)) were gleaned from the surfing and farming types from Miura Hanto. I always used naruhdo in the context of "interesting" or "oh, I see". For example, if I had no bottle opener and someone shows ...


1

"なったら" is correct, because "なったら" describes conditions, on the other hand "なると" describes subsequent events. 信号{しんごう}があおに(    )、道{みち}を渡{わた}っていいです。 "いいです" means "allow" or "feel free to do", so the former half of this sentence imposes a condition to be able to cross the road. You can make a choice freely whether you cross the road or not. "なると" means ...


1

Yes. みたい is usually about your perception or opinion. らしい conveys indirect information that you heard, saw or read somewhere. みたい ~ looks like Used when you think (subjectively) something looks or is like so. Used very often. お母{かあ}さんは怒{おこ}っているみたいだ。 彼{かれ}のことを好{す}きになってしまったみたいだ。 そのチケットは売{う}り切{き}れてしまったみたいだ。 らしい ~ appears to be, seems that, I ...


1

着る is for part on the upper body(but not everything, so is write from shoulder down, like put the cap 帽子{ぼうし}を被る{かぶる} put glasses メガネをかける) and for one piece like kimono 着物{きもの} 水着{みずぎ} ecc. ecc. はく is from the ankle to the tip of the toe (lower body included shoes).


1

You are right in that both verbs have roughly the same meaning. Here are the differences I could find with my (limited) knowledge of Japanese: 超える can be used when something exceeds the norm, or is out of the ordinary. 超す can be used for "moving home" (引っ超す), whereas the above cannot (引っ超える ). Another example is that you cannot say 年を超える、here 年を超す would ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible