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10

(~を)見つける means "to find ~~". (~を)探す means "to look for ~~". e.g. 探したけれど、ミーちゃんを見つけることはできませんでした。 We looked for Mii-chan, but we couldn't find her. 🐱


9

The main difference is in the distinction what is falling from where? Generally, things that are bound by the ground are said to 倒れる. Trees, buildings, people, poles, and so on. It also carries the sense of "to collapse". 落ちる, on the other hand, carries the broad sense of "fall" and often is not interchangeable with 倒れる. It's easier to show it with some ...


7

I think you have a couple choices. For "fluent": ペラペラ。 This is a slightly colloquial word (due to being an onomatopoeia sounding like quick speech), which can mean "fluent", both in the sense of (a) speaking uninterruptedly, and by extension, (b) being skilled in the language. This might be the most common word you hear when describing someone as "fluent" ...


6

The Sino-Japanese 発汗{はっかん}する 'perspire' sounds more like a formal, technical term, like you might find in a medical context. It isn't particularly common in normal speech. Imagine saying this in English: Man, I just ran five miles! I perspired so much! Sounds pretty silly, right? The first sentence sounds like casual English, but then I use the ...


6

I'm pretty sure that in this case, a more "transparent" translation would be "Mr. Smith, we're two students short." To me, the implication seems to be that 足りません means "insufficient" in the sense that whatever number of students they have is two short of being a full class, thus it is "insufficient" or "not enough" to call it a full class. Thus 生徒二人 in this ...


5

ウイルス等が検出されませんでした sounds more like "No virus were detected", which is different from "Virus-free". The first thing I'd like to mention is that most sophisticated Japanese e-commerce sites do not say anything like this in their download pages, at least in a large font. To me, saying "virus free" loudly already smells like typical foreign sites (some of which ...


5

Both 一所懸命 and 一生懸命 are currently in parallel use to mean endeavoring with all one’s might. The former literally means to risk one’s life “at a place” for achieving something, while the latter means to do something at “a risk of one’s life” for achieving something. Though 一所懸命 and 一生懸命 are used in the same meaning, 一生懸命 was derived from 一所懸命, which ...


5

First I must say that the definition of Japanese word レンジ is a bit confused. In everyday speech, it's understood as an oven-like cooking device, or more practically, by nine out of ten chances it'd mean 電子レンジ "microwave oven". (As an aside, オーブン means non-electrical oven as opposed to this.) But it also has the same meaning as the English "range", that is a ...


4

Basically, narcotics can be translated as 麻薬, which at least includes opioids like morphine and cocaine, but does not usually include 覚醒剤 like amphetamine or so-called 合法ドラッグ (legal drugs). If you need to use these terms strictly and professionally, you'll have to read serious review articles carefully, since it's "officially defined" in different ways by ...


4

Using a word なし seems to be a common way in Japanese, if a company or a developer team provides this kind of information. For example, a Japanese webpage about a software called AOMEI Buckupper uses this expression. 100%クリーンのインストール: スパイウェアなし、アドウェアなし、ウィルスなし!ご安心ください。 In the English webpage of this, it says 100% Clean Installation: NO SPYWARE, NO ...


4

彼女【かのじょ】はブルスが生きさせる means "Brews makes/lets her live" or "Brews enables her to live". Whether to use "make/let" or "enable" depends on the context (ie, whether "she" wants to die or live). This sentence is semantically the same as ブルスが彼女を生きさせる. が is the subject marker, so Brews is the one who does the action (=to make/let/allow someone (to) live). は is the ...


4

If you only need one digit precision, for example 4割 is equally common to 40パーセント. In hasty conversations, パーセント is often shortened to パー (eg. 40パー). If you need two digits precision, 4割5分 is no longer common today, and 45パーセント is the normal choice. Today, ○割○分(○厘) is used only in the following cases: in a fixed expression 九割九分 (=almost certainly/always) ...


4

In fact, they are quite different. If you 「挑発に乗る」, you respond to a provocation in the way it was intended for; you lose your head and do things you otherwise wouldn't. 「挑発に対応する」 would mean to deal with a provocation, likely in a calm and sensible manner. --- Answer to extra question #2 --- How I see them: ・「挑発に乗らない」= not respond to provocation in an ...


3

If you are asking this to someone who is already waiting for something now, whichever is fine. いつまで待つつもりですか may sound slightly blunter than いつまで待っているつもりですか, but the difference is very small. If you are asking this to someone who is going to start waiting for something in the future, いつまで待つつもりですか will be the natural choice. いつまで待っているつもりですか may sound odd for ...


3

興味を持っている is equivalent to "have an interest in sth." 興味がある is eqivalent to "be interested in sth." Both are saying the same thing.


3

‘Fluent’ is translated as 流暢な and 淀みない as adjectives, 流暢に、淀みなく as adverbs, and ペラペラ and すらすら as onomatopoeias, like 彼は英語をペラペラ(流暢に)話す。 The word ‘native speaker’ passes as “ネイティヴ・スピーカー” in Japanese own pronunciation. It can be rephrased as ”外(国)人並み,” which is a very popular phrase. Most Japanese would roll their eyes if they hear "ボゴワシャ," unless you show it ...


3

挑発に乗る means you respond to a provocation / challenge of others without discretion, or in the way the aggressor or provoker plotted. In Japanese, we respond to provocation but don't 'deal with' provocation. You can't be willy-nilly against a challenge or aggression directed to you. You should be resolute to the provocation, and your choice is either 挑発に乗る / ...


3

I think the issue here is that you are explicitly trying to map the English word "look(ed)" into a Japanese verb, when you don't really need to. Learn to think in Japanese, don't (always) try to translate your thoughts from English. So instead of trying to find a verb, you can just say that their clothes/style/whatever were cool. ...


2

Translating into English might make it confusing in this case. だ in だけど is 助動詞 and used when concluding something, presenting something, or specifying something, etc. But this Japanese word だ itself actually doesn’t specify the tense, so it can be used in the past, present or future tense. Generally, the context or the other words in the sentence tell what ...


2

It's just my opinion, I guess that a subject is different among those two sentences. For example: 私は[疑問]{ぎもん}を持っている I have a question. 私は疑問がある →私(に)は疑問がある There is a question in my mind The latter is a little bit more natural as spoken language in Japan than the former, but I think those are completely same. I feel many of the former are ...


2

ガスコンロ is a gas burner for cooking which is set on the kitchen unit. ガスレンジ is a cooker using gas as the heat source that comes with a box with a door on the front, in which food is cooked or heated.


2

Your sentences are unnatural. I suggest this sentence "もしよかったら、どんな(何の)ゲームソフトを使っているか教えてください。"


2

もしよろしければ、ゲームソフトは何をお使いのは教えていただけませんですか。 You can't use のは here; you need to use か, as in 「何をお使いか教えて~~」「何を使ってい(らっしゃ)るか教えて~~」「何をお使いなのか教えて~~」「何を使ってい(らっしゃ)るのか教えて~~」. And you don't need です here, as ません is already the polite form. So, you could say: もしよろしければ / [差]{さ}し[支]{つか}えなければ、ゲームソフトは何をお使い(なの)か教えていただけませんか。←formal もしよろしければ / ...


2

床屋{とこや} is a barbershop where men frequent, while 美容院{びよういん} is a beauty salon where women frequent. 髪床{かみどこ} is an abbreviation of 髪結{かみゆ}い床{どこ}, a shop who dresses men's hair by adjusting length of hair, binding it at the back of head, and shaving the top front of the head which is called 月代{つきしろ} (tsukisiro), in the Warring States and Edo era - You can ...


2

〇割 is commonly used. For example, この服を定価の一割安くします(I take ten percent off the price of this piece of clothing.), 私の学校の二割の生徒は、英語が話せる(Twenty percent of the students in my school can speak English). However, I think 〇分 which means percent isn't very common. For example, we don't say now "Five percent of the students in my school are Japanese" like ...


1

…したわ is a pretty oldish expression equivalent to today’s ……したよ, and it’s not a feminine particle at all. We used to hear “(それで) せいせい(がっかり、すっきり、さっぱり)したわ – I feel relieved (disappointed, refreshed, clean)” spoken by middle-aged and elderly men quite often until a few decades ago, though we probably don’t hear it so often today. Still it’s not unusual to ...


1

「いつまで待つつもり」can be translated to "Until when do you plan to wait?" 「いつまで待っているつもり」can be translated to "Until when do you plan to be waiting?" In other words, I think it's just a matter of tense (present vs. continuous) On a side note, both of these phrases are often used sarcastically, with the underlying tone being "hurry the heck up" and/or "what the ...


1

I'm going to try answering this using what little I've studied so far: もしよろしければ、ゲームソフトは何をお使いのは教えていただけませんですか。 Although a way to make 使う honorific is to use お使いです, I think this can only be done when it comes at the end of the sentence, not with other words in between. Furthermore, the sentence is trying to use both お使いです and いただけませんか, which I imagine are ...



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