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7

I think these are the basic terms: American English is アメリカ英語. British English is イギリス英語. They're both types of 英語, just like American English and British English are both types of English. That doesn't mean no one ever puts it differently. You might find 米語 and 英語 used as short forms to refer to American and British English, for example. Here are ...


7

良い can be read both いい and よい. 良{よ}い is more formal than いい. But they are very similar words and they sometimes can safely exchangeable. For example, the following words are the same and both mean "good boy/girl". いい子{こ} 良{よ}い子{こ} Sometimes, いい cannot replace with 良い in casual language. For instance, in Japanese version of Facebook you call "Like" button, ...


6

Off the top of my head I would summarize the differences as follows. 信じる is to believe a single fact or statement (or, by extension, believe that something exists or is true) 信用する is to have faith in a source of information 信頼する is to trust a person (or institution) So, for example 田中さんを信じる。 I believe what Mr. Tanaka said. 田中さんを信用できる。 I can ...


6

I will start by saying that Japanese-speakers do not say 「いいえ」 nearly as often as English-speakers say "No". 「いいえ」 is not an everyday word for many of us the same way "No" is for English-speakers. In Japanese, we answer questions negatively mainly by negating the main verb, adjective or noun used in the question itself. To the question "Wanna eat soba ...


6

The most generic would be 「[青緑色]{あおみどりいろ}」 or 「[青緑系]{あおみどりけい}の[色]{いろ}」-- especially the latter IMHO. It covers a wide range of tints and shades of greenish-blues. 「[水色]{みずいろ}」 is just light blue with absolutely no green in it. It is the name of one of the more common colors of crayon, so practically no native speakers would imagine a different color upon ...


5

作業 is closer to tasks or procedures, which can be 'finished' in a few minutes or a few days. 仕事 refers to both small tasks and lifelong vocations. If you want to ask someone's occupation, you can say "あなたの仕事は何ですか?" but not "あなたの作業は何ですか?" (well, let's forget about honorific expressions for now). When you look at a calendar and want to check what you have to ...


5

There's no implicit order which word you should use for stacking sections. You can (basically) freely choose linking words for you additional sections. A non-exhaustive list is: 次{つぎ}に, 更{さら}に(は), そして, それから, その上{うえ}(に), この上{うえ}(に), 加{くわ}えて, それに加{くわ}え(て), 他{ほか}に(も), また, 並{なら}びに, および, それだけでなく, のみならず etc. etc. Variations for "firstly" and "finally" are: ...


5

混ぜた材料を - To be explicit about what you are referring to And just regarding the rest of your sentence - 丼 → ボール and 1分 (don't need the っ)


4

You would say バスは[10分]{じっぷん(じゅっぷん)}[後]{ご}に来ます。 or バスは([後]{あと})10分で来ます。


4

In your examples, they're interchangeable. In general, 語る is only used when someone tells a story, opinion, idea, etc. You cannot use 語る when just おはよう or ごめん is said. In this case I think 語る is closer to tell and 言う is closer to say, because we can say 'say hello' but not 'tell hello'. (Of course the usage of tell and 語る are very different) 語る is safely ...


4

Yes, I've heard 奴 used to refer to females before. Of course, it is more frequently used to refer to males. But remember that the rules of grammar and convention are not so strict in casual, colloquial conversation (which is typically where 奴 is used to refer to anyone). Although I've never heard a female refer to herself as 奴 before, I've heard college-age ...


4

We are talking about two different (though related) shades of meaning of 「けっこう」 here. "no longer in need of ~~" 「もうけっこうです。」 means "I want no more ~~." 「もういいです。」 has at least two meanings. One is the same as 「もうけっこうです。」, but it is less formal than 「もうけっこうです。」. The other meaning is "(Something) is ready to (or 'to be') ~~." "sufficient", ...


3

You could use 逃げるんだね as a command, but I don't think you should use it. Here are the reasons. The phrase is commanding the listener to escape, but it also has an extra nuance that the speaker is not concerned about the result the listener's escape, or the speaker thinks the listener can't do it. It sounds ironic. 逃げるんだね also sounds like asking a question ...


3

If somebody calls other one ~~奴, I'll assume the referent is the speaker's close (often the same-sex) friend, or someone has frictions with him/her, or s/he is casually mentioning an unspecified person. There's no gender restrictions anyway. As an aside, 奴 can colloquially refer things whose names are unclear to the speaker or hearer, in this case it's even ...


2

I would usually use 後{ご}, as an indication of what is to come : バスが十分{じゅっぷん}後{ご}に来{き}ます。 Another example : 飛行機{ひこうき}は10分後{ご}に離陸{りりく}します。 Maybe you also know 後{あと}で as a way to say, afterwards, in a while, this is the same kanji. You can use it this way : 電車{でんしゃ}は後{あと}五分で発車{はっしゃ}します。


2

Indeed, what is truth? The answer to your question has two parts: one very simple, and another very difficult. Today, these three characters are used in slightly different contexts: 誠{まこと} is "sincerity," i.e. a basis in a true heart (see below). Such a judgmental word is not heard much these days in Japanese or English. In fact, you most often hear it in ...


2

Kon'nichiwa sometime used as saying Good afternoon or Hello. Konbanwa is good evening.


1

~ないと is usually used for rules, social conventions, very important appointments, and is often abbreviated to just ~ないと. (with no explanatory clause following) 運動をしないとね = Undou wo shinai to ne / 'Cause if you don't work out, then... = "gotta work out" 手を洗わないとね = gotta wash your hands. (to me personally it feels more like "yeah because if you don't wash ...


1

Konichiwa is the basic hello. ~10:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Konnbanwa is good evening, an other greeting. ~7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. ohayou gozaimasu is good mornning ~1:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.



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