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8

The short answer is "because Japanese speakers will it to be that way." The pedagogical answer is that 払う operates on お金, not the thing you're paying for. This is exactly the same as in English. You don't "pay drinks." You pay for drinks. Drinks are not the direct object in English or Japanese. The money is the direct object, so you follow it with を. If ...


7

You can't ✗ "pay the drinks" ✗ 飲み物を払う in English either, even though you can ○ "pay the bill" ○ 勘定を払う ○ "pay the rent" ○ 家賃を払う ○ "pay attention" ○ 注意を払う In other words, 「〜を払う」 corresponds more closely to "to pay ~" than "to pay for ~", which should not be surprising considering that is the syntactic equivalent. As to why ...


6

Yes, たい can be used for another's, and たがる for your own desires あなたは行きたくて、佐藤さんは行きたくないんですね。 私がフランスに行きたがるのは、理由があります。 Part of this are my own thoughts, part of this is taken from this paper: 中里 理子, 1992, 従属節における「たい」と「たがる」. Overview Often it is said that たい can be used to talk about your own desires only. While this is not wrong, it is not ...


5

If it's chiefly a "visual redesign", I'd say デザインを新しくします(しました)。("We'll have/We've got a new design!") 更新: It'll mean "update" of website, like adding a new article on WordPress. Maybe デザインの更新 would get your meaning across. The "refresh" sense is limited to browser function. 改築: It sounds like you revamp the site's structure, or something. 改造: Same as ...


5

Both are correct for different meanings and/or nuances. 「[終]{お}わりたい」 is used to talk about something that one is actively and/or personally involved in. One would generally have at least an amount of control of when it can be finished. Example: You have been doing your homework and you wish to finish it as soon as possible so you can go play tennis. ...


4

If you ask about "actual" difference, the fact is that the major part of their meanings are overlapping so you can't really find an example only one of them is acceptable and others are not. Administrations might define these words as they like. However, according to my personal sense, the basic ideas are: 地区 vs 地帯 vs 地域 They are suitable for indicating ...


4

That would definitely be 「あげる」 if you are speaking from the giver's standpoint. 「AさんはBさんにプレゼントをあげた。」= "A gave B a present." If, however, you are speaking from the receiver's standpoint, you would use 「もらう」. 「BさんはAさんに(or から)プレゼントをもらった。」 = "B received a present from A." 「くれる」 cannot be used to talk about a transaction between two third parties.


4

While there exists a large amount of interchangeability between 「[回]{かい}」 and 「[度]{ど}」, it is also true that in certain situations, only using one of the two is either "correct" or "preferred" over the other. Interchangeable: General frequency: "X has happened Y times.", "Person X has done something Y times.", etc. 「この[冬]{ふゆ}、4回/度[雪]{ゆき}が[降]{ふ}った。」= ...


4

開発 is clearly different from the other two. 開発 means creation, engineering, etc., and 開発する is transitive. コンピュータを開発する means to create/build/engineer computers. As you pointed out, 開発(する) can be used when something new is created. 発展 and 発達 share the similar meaning to a certain extent. コンピュータの発展 and コンピュータの発達 both refer to the advancement of the computer ...


3

In general you will want to the already suggested phrases but if you are talking about juice specifically, you will want to use 「果汁100%」as it doesn't make sense to talk about added sugars in juices. If that were the case, then you would just indicate the percentage of real fruit juice e.g. 果汁30%, which means that the rest of the drink consists of sugar ...


3

I personally think of it this way. 教える although meaning to teach, can be used in place of the English to tell. For example, 電話番号を教えてください。Please TELL me you phone number. 天体物理学{てんたいぶつりがく}について教えてください。Please TEACH me about Astrophysics In this instance please TEACH me your phone number would sound somewhat odd (similar to I never want to forget your ...


3

I would like to add a note on the implications of 〜てみたい. Consider the case of the verb 行く. In a simple sentence such as Xに行ってみたい, it may imply you have never been to X before. In general, however, it implies that the verbal action is in some sense something new to you, and that you'd like to experience it. Or in other words, if you are trying out something ...


3

~たい expresses your desire to do something. ~てみる is used to express that you will try something (usually for the first time). so when you put them together, ~てみたい expresses that you want to try to do something for the first time. (which would imply that you will see if you like it or not). This works for all verbs. 夏休みに日本に行きたいです。 I want to go to Japan during ...


3

First, whether the main verb is 「[食]{た}べる」 or 「[行]{い}く」, the usages of 「~~たい」 and 「~~てみたい」 stay the same. If I said 「スペインに行ってみたい。」, what should you know as a listener? You should know that: 1) I am interested in going to Spain. And also that; 2) I have never been to Spain. ← This is an implied fact. From this simple sentence alone, however, ...


3

No subtleties, just grammar. First, 相関 stands for "correlation" as noun and "to correlate" as verb. Now, × 国民の平均身長は栄養状態と相関だ。 It's an ungrammatical sentence because Japanese postpositions can't modify noun by its own, contrary to English prepositions (but similarly to that of Latin & Romance languages). Grammatical ones are: (a) ...


2

This is a good example of how bilingual dictionaries can become pretty useless at times. They just give you the counterparts in the other language; They do not define the words for you. 「根気」 is the will power that one needs to have in order to continue doing the same thing for an extended period of time. Close to "untiringness". 「忍耐」 means enduring one's ...


2

The correct one is 幸せにする, because する is usually the causative form of なる/である. But it seems that when the object is a person, させる is often used instead of する as a light verb. うれしくさせたい つらい思いをさせないで 幸せな気持ちにさせる する, なる, である, etc. are used in the active sense. 好きにしろ つらい思いをする 幸せな気持ちになりたい So it is understandable that some people may say 幸せにさせる unconsciously.


2

You can interpret it as 『国民の栄養状態は平均身長と相関』だ but the 国民の栄養状態は平均身長と相関 part is still imcomplete sentence. Likewise, 「『Windows 10はRaspberry Piと対応』ですか?」 So, it's different from 相関している or 対応している.


2

Generally speaking, 「無くす」 would be a more versatile word than 「失う」 as the latter is a more nuanced word. While 「無くす」 is an everyday word that even toddlers can use actively and correctly, you will not see small kids using the word 「失う」 in real life. I think it safe to say that 「失う」 is used more often in writing than in speaking. Only 「無くす」 can be used to ...


2

Do 〜によると and 〜によれば have similar meanings at all? Yes, very much so. In fact, in informal speech between two individuals, the two are largely, if not completely, interchangeable. We just do not hold each other responsible for word choices like these. In the media, however, the distinction is made more often and more strictly than in people's daily ...


2

Actually じゃ、また is the abbreviated form of では[Indicate changing the subject of conversation]、また(again)今度(next time)会いましょう(meet) which, altogether, gives "See (you) again next time".


2

I'd recommend a beginner not to use たがる at all (but ~しようとする or ~したいと思う instead) because it tends to convey a contemptuous nuance and depending on cases, the meaning is slightly different from "to want", which highly matches ~したいと思っている. Expressing other person's inner thought in indicative is avoided, in other words, it's ok if it's not indicative. For ...


2

ノンシュガー and シュガーレス are also common.


2

In this context, 帰る can mean either "to come home" or "to go home". Essentially, it means "to return home", which can imply either direction (coming or going). So, we use the ~てくる construction (movement toward the speaker) to make it clear that the person is coming home. We can also use the ~ていく construction (movement away from the speaker), but I think ...


1

Short answer: matcha is correct. I don't know about maccha being represented by any official romanization system, though this is actually the way that the word would be entered in most Japanese input systems, a so-called Wāpuro rōmaji or kana spelling. Long answer: There are different romanization systems, for instance Hepburn romanization, which would lead ...


1

Absolutely. For example, consider the phrase 寂しい場所. A desolate place. Do you think it necessarily must be 悲しい場所 as well? I don't.


1

I think it is 砂糖が入っていない or 無糖.


1

I tried to explain this as best as I could, and how I generally think of this construction. 行く is used when you say someone is 'going somewhere' and 来る is used when you say someone is 'coming'. The verb you use is dependent on YOUR POSITION. If I was in America right now and I wanted to say "my friend is going to go to Japan", I would translate it as ...


1

Something that 光る is something that emits/reflects light. The sun. A star. A flashlight. An LED. 輝く is to shimmer/sparkle. The sun reflecting off a lake's waves does 輝く. A diamond reflecting light does this. As for 光り輝く, it's the same thing as 輝く. And as someone else here said, if you just want to compare words to get a nuanced meaning of the word, a ...


1

As others have pointed out, there are many ways that one can say farewell. However, you seem interested in the shortest, most common way to say it casually. This is the phrase that you want: じゃね! To clarify, the phrase 「じゃ、またね!」is used in the same way we might say "Ok, see you later!" in English. The また part carries the meaning of "later". If you ...



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