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11

The most common word and character associated for this kind of usage is [圏]{けん}. Anglosphere would be [英語圏]{えいごけん}, and a common term to refer to the East Asian cultural sphere is [漢字文化圏]{かんじぶんかけん} which encompasses China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam.


10

As you have correctly guessed, 文章 refers to a group of sentences/paragraphs. To refer to a single sentence, simply use 文, which is perfectly fine as a technical term, too. 一文 means "one sentence". It's used when one needs to emphasize "one".


8

Q1: Is there any difference between しだいで and 次第で, the former seeming a little softer and childish (if at all I can consider しだい as childish)? Sometimes writing in kanji is called 閉じる and writing in hiragana is called 開く. There are no strict official rules on how to write something in kanji or in kana. This decision is difficult even for native speakers ...


8

楽しい or 面白い can be used with various words which add a specific meaning and nuance to simple 楽しい or 面白い. So, how about using those words with it and creating various kinds of 楽しい / 面白い? For example, 本当に楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 最高に楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 いろいろ楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 なかなか楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 [久々]{ひさ・びさ}に楽しかったです。 / 面白かったです。 ...


8

お人【ひと】好【よ】し usually has a negative connotation; someone who is generous to a fault, someone who doesn't know how to doubt others. 「彼はお人好しだ」 is mildly derogatory in most cases. いい人 is usually positive (「彼はいい人だ」 is not derogatory), although it may be used sarcastically depending on the context. In this sentence, the speaker rephrased お人好し as いい人 because the ...


7

嬉しい nowadays is mostly used to express your happiness during a certain moment or time, and it's usually brief periods of joy and related to a close event(either by speech or by time). For example, if you just got a package you waited for, you'll be 嬉しい. If you passed your test, you're going to be 嬉しい. 幸せ(な) is used to express long-term joy, or put more ...


7

進歩 is advancement to a higher/better/improved stage. Mainly used with scientific/technical ideas. 科学の進歩, コンピュータの進歩, 進歩したエンジン. 進行 is: progress to a advanced (often worse) stage: 癌の進行, 環境破壊が進行した progress of a plan, procedure, task, etc: 予定の進行, 結婚式の進行, 研究の進行状況 running/moving of a train, car, etc: 列車の進行, 進行方向の安全確認


7

The far more versatile choice is 「[地図]{ちず}」; No question about it. I would say that an average native speaker would learn to use 「マップ」 a good 10 years after learning to use 「ちず」 as a toddler. In school, the word used is 「地図」 virtually 100% of the time and that is both in and outside of geography classes. In daily life, when you draw a simple map to show ...


7

There is also the word [分野]{ぶん・や} that means field/realm/sphere. Some examples 研究分野 → field of research 彼は物理学の分野でよく知られている → He is well-known in the field of physics 彼は彫刻の分野では第一人者だ → He is second to none in the world of sculpture. Also the suffix 〜[界]{かい}. 政界 → the political world 芸能界 → the entertainment world; show businesses 業界 → ...


7

対義語 and 反対語 both work, but I personally think 対義語 is better. 反対語 is the word I heard mainly at elementary school. It's probably because every kid knows what 反対 means, but 対義語 is too difficult for them. It's perfectly fine to use 反対語 in daily conversations, but after I became an adult, I see 対義語 more often in serious articles. Wikipedia also uses 対義語 as the ...


6

I'm not sure if it's the best way to refer to the group, which I think would depend on your motives, but my favorite journalist, [池上]{いけがみ}[彰]{あきら}, uses 「イスラム国{こく}」, and I think that's a pretty clear choice. You can also use 「[ISIL]{アイシル}」 (which is what the Japanese Wikipedia article uses). Since "ISIL" is an acronym, it is more opaque in that sense, and ...


6

によって vs 次第で There are many ways to describe the difference between them. Let me give a picture first. X 次第 could be explained like "depending on how X acts/becomes", or typically the cause-effect relationship is unknown, or by chance, or the result that is brought about is not clear from the first impression of X or hard to explain beforehand, or the ...


5

「それでも、[俺]{おれ}はその[繊細]{せんさい}な[声]{こえ}が[誰]{だれ}のものかすぐに[気]{き}づく。」 "Does もの here refer to a voice?" Yes, it does. If so, would there be any difference between the above and the following? 「それでも、俺はその繊細な声が誰の声かすぐに気づく。」 There is no difference in meaning, but as you stated, repeating the same word only a few syllables after using it once like in ...


4

"ようこそ、いらっしゃいませ" and "ようこそ、お越しやす," its popular Kansai version are a set of phrases welcoming the guest. "ようこそ" is a variation of "よくこそ" meaning “true / indeed / rightly.” よくこそ is used in such way as; よくこそ言ってくれた - Indeed, you said exactly what I wish to say. よくこそここまで来た - Really (Thank God), we came a long way up to here. Though the phrase, “いらっしゃいませ – ...


4

(Question 1) Buses in metropolitan areas are commonly (usually?) marked with numbers and letters. I don't know the statistical figure, but most buses have one number, possibly combined with one kanji or alphabet, followed by the destinations (eg. 茶51 秋葉原駅前, ②つくばセンター). Buses in rural areas may only have their destinations (eg. 湯涌温泉(行)). (Question 2) 番 ...


4

文章を[直]{なお}してください is fine. You can also say 書いた文を[訂正]{ていせい}してください because 訂正 gets used a lot and implies that you gotta correct something. You don't use [正]{ただ}す, [訂]{てい}する in daily speech and [改]{あらた}める is used for intangible things like behavior or speech. PS for the Korean version look at the very bottom of this page. CLARIFICATION [訂正]{ていせい} means fix ...


4

「ないようがわからないかたは、おうちの人にがめんをみせてください。」 This sentence, while 100% grammatical, sounds kind of awkward, and I am sure that, as a fellow Japanese-speaker, you probably felt the same way. Even though it is a little awkward, it probably could not be improved much because it has been written to express something that the Japanese language is not designed well to ...


4

現住所 is the place where you live, i.e. your home address. 連絡先 is the point (in most cases phone number) that the recipient of your resume can take contact with somebody responsible in case you are not available on the phone number of your home address. When I make a trip abroad, the travel agency requests me to fill in my 現住所 and 連絡先 in the designated ...


4

There's 圏 as in e.g. 漢字文化圏(かんじぶんかけん) and 英語圏(えいごけん).


4

If I am placed in the situation you describe, I say "初めて会う人がいる or 初対面の人がいる". And I think we don't say "ああ 新しい顔があります!" or "ああ 新しい顔がいます!". It's the direct translation of an English saying. In addition, If the situation is in school, we call them 転入生 and 転校生. If the situation is in a company, we call them 新人.


3

I think it's along the lines of your idea of your Japanese not being as advanced as you'd like, and at the same time, it also has something to do with the words being common. Think about it: the only reason you can even pick out exactly which words you're using is because you have to think over everything you're about to say or write down for another ...


2

I think 嬉しい男の子 is unnatural. 嬉しい is mainly used in oneself like 私は友達ができて 嬉しい and isn't used in modifying nouns. 幸せな男の子が図書館で勉強しました is natural.


2

I feel that generally speaking ~によって and ~次第で have a very similar meaning. On this page you can see a post which discusses these where someone comments that ~次第で has a more stiff/formal feeling. While I wouldn't say that ~によって is exactly the most informal word (It expresses a higher level concept that I don't think children would use too often), I agree that ...


2

Exactly. See how different they are. (Sorry for oversized image.) We imagine 手袋 as a kind of clothes for everyday life and work, and グローブ as a sports gear. Of course, more accurate transcription of glove is グラブ, which is preferred by baseball players. Some Japanese traditional sports have gloves that are never called グローブ. For example, in 剣道【けんどう】 they ...


1

This meaning is confusing because in English we really don't modify words like "this" in the same way. However, if you think of "僕のこれ" as a combination of "this" and "mine", it makes more sense. For example, imagine that the person is pointing to two objects so it is clear what "これ” means. I'd translate this as "Let's trade this, of yours, with this, of ...


1

In Japanese, one does not use "いる" to describe things that happen to be attached to living persons. You would use "ある" for body-parts, prosthetics, (internal) organs, clothing, hair, accessories, acne and makeup (although there are more appropriate words depending on what you are saying). The list goes on. The exception would be if whatever item you were ...


1

In such cases, katakana センテンス is better, like 「英語のセンテンスには必ず本動詞がある。」, because 文 is ambiguous and can mean "a sentence" or "writings(文章)". Any good Japanese dictionary must have センテンス as an entry.


1

I think 好きな服装は何ですか? and 好きな服はなんですか? are correct and 好きなファッションは何ですか? is also ordinary used but 様式 isn't used in fashion. I think 様式 is formal. A dictionary say http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/jn/226436/meaning/m0u/ In addition, スタイル means mainly "a shape of a body" in Japan.


1

While in daily conversation イスラム国 is often used, in media like NHK I never heard anything different than 過激派{かげきは}組織{そしき}イスラム国{こく}, i.e. ISIS seems to never be referred to using only イスラム国.


1

the official translation of the map app on iOS is マップ, which leads me to think it's only used to denote a specific app whose NAME is マップ; but indeed, when referring to an actual map, and not the app that bares such name, they use 地図.



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