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7

The verb is usually written 落とす. 落す is a much less common variant (which is not an official reading: 落: ラク、お-ちる、お-とす). The BCCWJ has 落とす 1657 results 落す  130 results One way to remember the okurigana is to note that the reading of the kanji should be short enough, i.e. the okurigana should be long enough, to accommodate all transitive/intransitive ...


7

Basically, 僕 is for boys. If you didn't know this, don't use 僕. However, according to one recent survey, 1.2% of female middle school students actually use 僕 (source). About 20 years ago when I was a middle school student, there was one (and only one) girl around me who was using 僕 on a daily basis for some reason. After that, I've met a few people who have ...


6

I think the most neutral term for a third-person is 同性愛者{どうせいあいしゃ}. If you're looking for a little less formal-sounding word ゲイ or ホモセクシュアル will also convey the idea. http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E5%90%8C%E6%80%A7%E6%84%9B%E8%80%85


6

The former, かわいいのは私です is correct, and means "It is me who is cute." It's a cleft sentence made from a very simple sentence 私はかわいいです ("I am cute"). See this answer for details about cleft sentences. This の functions as a "placeholder", like it in "It is me who is cute." かわいい is a typical i-adjective, and it doesn't work as a no-adjective or a noun. かわいいの私です ...


5

This くれる means "someone give something to someone", so the action is the other side. そのお菓子を息子にくれますか? is translated as "Can you give the snack to my son?" This もらう means "someone receive something from someone", so the action is speakers' side. そのお菓子を息子にもらえますか? is translated as "Can I receive the snack from my son?" but it is unnatural to say that to someone....


5

[暗証番号]{あんしょうばんごう} is the appropriate word for those cases. The same word is used for bank account PINs and ten-key door lock pass codes as well.


5

How about 番号{ばんごう}? as in 暗証番号


5

The expressions you listed all seem fine to me. But there are other expressions that can be used, with different nuances. These are used mainly for shogi moves, but I believe you can use them also for chess. Using jargon, in the order of severity: ~は大【だい】悪手【あくしゅ】だ ~は悪手【あくしゅ】だ ~は疑問手【ぎもんしゅ】だ ~は緩手【かんしゅ】だ More vaguely: ~は味が悪い ~はよくない ~は苦しい/~は(後で)苦しくなる ~は緩い ...


5

Yes 多忙 is generally more formal than 忙しい, but you can safely use 多忙 in everyday business conversations. But note that 多忙 is not always semantically interchangeable with 忙しい. 多忙 means having a full schedule over a relatively long period (at least for days, usually for months or years). 私は多忙です doesn't mean "I'm busy (now)" but it sounds more like "I am a busy ...


4

I think you may be confusing the meaning of 義 a little bit. The common meaning between 仁義 and 正義 is "morality" (as in following one's obligations), rather than "justice". There are a number of differences: 仁義 Used to refer to two of the Confucian moral ideals, 仁 and 義 in one word The moral compunction to protect others from harm Social obligations ...


4

Here's some other variants: フランス生まれだけど、心は日本人。 I was born in France, but my heart is Japanese. カナダ人ですけど、考え方はフランス人。 I am Canadian but I think like a French person. マレーシア生まれの中国人ですけど、長い間ドイツで仕事したので、感覚はドイツ人かもしれないです。 I am a Malaysian-born Chinese but because I have worked in Germany for a long time, my sense (way of thinking) is likely German. アメリカで生まれたが、...


4

Here are two possible expressions you can use (After the "I was born in France" part): (私は)もうすっかりアメリカ人になっています。 (私は)自分の事をアメリカ人だと思っています。 I think if you modified your above attempt to say "自分がアメリカ人みたいな感じ", it would be a little more natural.


4

横断(する)is 音読み. 横切る is 訓読み. Both are saying the same thing - crossing the road. As common with 音読み mode which follows old way of Chinese writing and pronounciation (both 漢音 - Chinese language spoken in 汉 (Han) during Bc 206 through AD 220 and 呉音 spoken in 呉 (Wu) during AD 222 through 280), 横断 might sound a bit stiffer than 横切る. But we say quite casually "...


4

I know that オリンピックに向けて is the better choice, but it's hard to explain why... 実用日本語表現辞典 explicitly explains this usage (link): 向けて 「向ける」の連用形。「~に向けて」などと言う場合、後に動詞が続かなくても、「~」を目的や目標と定め、そこに至るために種々の施策を行うことを表すことが多い。 When the target is an intangible event such as オリンピック, 納品日 and 発表, you will hear ~に向けて more often, while ~に向かって would not be entirely wrong....


4

~(の)如し is used as a predicate. (sounds archaic rather than simply literary) ~(の)如き modifies a noun (i.e., adjectivally). ~(の)如く modifies a verb (i.e., adverbially). その動きは蝶の如し。 His movement is like a butterfly. 光陰矢の如し。 Time flies. (lit. "Days and nights are like arrows.") 蝶の如き動きを見せた。 He showed a butterfly-like movement. 蝶の如く動いた。 He moved like a ...


3

「ご確認ください」は尊敬語、「確認なさってください」も尊敬語なので「ご確認なさってください」は二重敬語かもしれませんね。しかし、いずれにしても問題ない表現だと思います。変に感じるかどうかは個人差のある問題だと思います。 P.S. 一般に、尊敬語の命令形は(尊敬語ではなく)丁寧語になります。命令形は聞き手へ向けられるものであるところ、聞き手への敬意を表すのは丁寧語だからです…多分。


3

"老いる" means "get old," in terms of age as well as physical and mental conditions. 老いること isn't a desirable matter. But you cannot evade it. It's a rule of nature. Sometimes you can get wiser as you progress in age. In that sense, "老いる," sui generis doesn't have so much negative tone as our Minister of Finance, Taro Aso thinks - He said recently in his ...


3

[彷徨]{さまよ}[へ]{え}: the 命令形 (imperative form) of さまよふ, which is the archaic version of さまよう [狂]{くる}[へ]{え}: the 命令形 of くるふ, the archaic version of 狂う る: the 連体形 (attributive form) of り, which is an archaic auxiliary verb similar in purpose to た/だ (perfective) or ている/でいる in modern Japanese. It takes the "imperative" form for whatever reason. So さまよえるオランダ人 is ...


3

You can say 「私はフランス生まれだけど、」 ("Though I am French-born," ) or 「私はフランスで生まれたけど、」("Though I was born in France,") but not 「私はフランスで生まれだけど、」 ("Though I'm in France born,"(?)). Tweaking your translation (minimally), we may come up with: 私は[フランス生まれだ/フランスで生まれた]けど、自分がアメリカ人[のような/みたいな]感じだ。 Or you could say something like: (私は)生まれはフランス人ですが、心はアメリカ人です。 (I am a ...


3

There is no difference in meaning between 白い and しろい. Both are an adjective that can be used attributively and predicatively as in: 白い花 White flower 肌が白い Skin is white. You can read the Wikipedia article on Japanese writing system to understand which one to use in writing. Basically, kana is used when there is no corresponding kanji. 白 and ...


3

No, I don't think so. People would say 忙しい naturally. Also, I noticed that if you are saying your own busyness, you won't use なかなか, instead けっこう、とても、かなり. なかなか is more to 2nd/3rd person/ object, which is out of your expectation. Although, grammatically and logically it is not wrong.


2

組み合わせ is combination/ grouping. Literal meaning: 組み group 合わせ match/ matching This is unfortunately not proper for padlock. It would give an entire whole different meaning if you are asking for matching padlock (in terms of shape, color, etc. to other padlock/ item that makes the original padlock looks better)


2

I think the most widely applicable phrase might be: 自分のことを X だと考えている 自分のことを日本人だと考えています I identify as Japanese (国籍) 自分のことをプログラマーだと考えています I identify as a programmer (職業) 自分のことを阪神のファンだと考えています I identify as a Hanshin fan (団体所属) This is very similar to saying "I think of myself as X", which I think is basically equivalent to "I identify as X". ...


2

天地をかけて一回さいころを投げる 自分の運命をかけて Both of these are using かける in the same way. I would say they both fit with the meaning of 賭ける or possibly 懸ける. 賭ける and 懸ける both involve risking the loss of something. In the case of this definition, risking the loss of 天地 (everything) and risking the loss of 運命 (one's fortunes). There are basically 3 kinds of かける: To be ...


2

Generally speaking, there's difference between 向ける (> 向けて) and 向かう (> 向かって), where the former is transitive "head something for"/"have something face to (somewhere)" and the latter is intransitive "head yourself for"/"face to (somewhere)". But you can use them with abstract goal (i.e. not actual place). In this case, they have a little more nuances: A に向けて ...


2

These are all different forms of the helping verb ごとし. They are used differently this way: 如し ⇒ のようだ (used as a verb) 如く ⇒ のように、のようで (used like an adverb) 如き ⇒ のような (used as an adjective) 目差しは炎の如し ⇒ 目差しは炎のようだ (his) gaze was as a flaming fire 海の如く広い草原を渡る ⇒ 海のように広い草原を渡る (we) cross a plain wide as the sea 馬の如き速さで走る ⇒ 馬のような速さで走る to run ...


1

I think 横切る is often more proper when the subject of 横切る interrupts some flow. 道を横切る makes me imagine someone crossing a road by interrupting the traffic flow. 道を横断する doesn't make me imagine such situation. 不安が横切る is like an anxious feeling crosses one's mind interrupting other thoughts. 大名行列の前を/カメラの前を横切る is exactly interrupting a flow of 大名行列 or visible ...



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