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6

奇術【きじゅつ】: Illusion or stage magic, which has tricks and is performed by real magicians all over the world. A person who does this is called マジシャン or 奇術師. But in this sense, the most common word is katakana マジック. Table magic is often called 手品【てじな】, too. 魔法【まほう】: Supernatural kind of magic. Typical 魔法 is what you can find in Harry Potter franchise or various ...


5

揃う is used when all the members of a certain group/family/section get together. When used for inanimate objects, it means that everything that composes a certain larger thing gets together. 揃った? Is everyone here? 部品が揃った All the pieces (of a machine, etc) are prepared. You can use 全員(が) or すべて(が) with 揃う, but it's usually optional and doesn't ...


5

Both are correct for different meanings and/or nuances. 「[終]{お}わりたい」 is used to talk about something that one is actively and/or personally involved in. One would generally have at least an amount of control of when it can be finished. Example: You have been doing your homework and you wish to finish it as soon as possible so you can go play tennis. ...


4

That would definitely be 「あげる」 if you are speaking from the giver's standpoint. 「AさんはBさんにプレゼントをあげた。」= "A gave B a present." If, however, you are speaking from the receiver's standpoint, you would use 「もらう」. 「BさんはAさんに(or から)プレゼントをもらった。」 = "B received a present from A." 「くれる」 cannot be used to talk about a transaction between two third parties.


4

If it's chiefly a "visual redesign", I'd say デザインを新しくします(しました)。("We'll have/We've got a new design!") 更新: It'll mean "update" of website, like adding a new article on WordPress. Maybe デザインの更新 would get your meaning across. The "refresh" sense is limited to browser function. 改築: It sounds like you revamp the site's structure, or something. 改造: Same as ...


4

If you ask about "actual" difference, the fact is that the major part of their meanings are overlapping so you can't really find an example only one of them is acceptable and others are not. Administrations might define these words as they like. However, according to my personal sense, the basic ideas are: 地区 vs 地帯 vs 地域 They are suitable for indicating ...


4

What foregin word is マスカット derived from? As already pointed out in the comment section, the word is derived from "muscat", a type of grape. What is the most commonly used word in Japanese for green grape? The usual word for "green grape" (precisely in this generality) is 白ブドウ. Is マスカット an accurate translation for green grape? In Japan, マスカット ...


4

Both 時間帯 and タイムゾーン work, and both are very common ways to speak about time zones. But one thing you should know is that 時間帯 also describes the specific period of time in a day. Say, 朝の時間帯 means "the morning time" and used in this way it doesn't describes time zones. In short, if it is clear your sentence is talking about time zones, you can use either, but ...


4

Only in negative sentences, 「[二度]{にど}と」, not「二度」, can mean "again". 「マクドナルドへは二度と[行]{い}かない!」= "I'll never go to McDonald's again!" In affirmative sentences, 「二度」 always means "twice". 「二度と」 cannot be used in affirmative sentences. 「日本に二度行ったことがあります。」= "I have been to Japan twice." 「[再]{ふたた}び」 means "again" in any situation. 「[去年]{きょねん}再び日本に行った。」 means ...


4

The nuance of 好きではない depends largely on the context and the tone of the speaker's voice. People often use 好きではない when they actually hate something/someone, because 嫌い is a very strong and offensive word. Someone who says 嫌い too often is someone who is disliked by others. 好きではない can act as an euphemistic expression, so to say. 苦手【にがて】だ (be not good at ~) is ...


4

While there exists a large amount of interchangeability between 「[回]{かい}」 and 「[度]{ど}」, it is also true that in certain situations, only using one of the two is either "correct" or "preferred" over the other. Interchangeable: General frequency: "X has happened Y times.", "Person X has done something Y times.", etc. 「この[冬]{ふゆ}、4回/度[雪]{ゆき}が[降]{ふ}った。」= ...


3

I would like to add a note on the implications of 〜てみたい. Consider the case of the verb 行く. In a simple sentence such as Xに行ってみたい, it may imply you have never been to X before. In general, however, it implies that the verbal action is in some sense something new to you, and that you'd like to experience it. Or in other words, if you are trying out something ...


3

~たい expresses your desire to do something. ~てみる is used to express that you will try something (usually for the first time). so when you put them together, ~てみたい expresses that you want to try to do something for the first time. (which would imply that you will see if you like it or not). This works for all verbs. 夏休みに日本に行きたいです。 I want to go to Japan during ...


3

First, whether the main verb is 「[食]{た}べる」 or 「[行]{い}く」, the usages of 「~~たい」 and 「~~てみたい」 stay the same. If I said 「スペインに行ってみたい。」, what should you know as a listener? You should know that: 1) I am interested in going to Spain. And also that; 2) I have never been to Spain. ← This is an implied fact. From this simple sentence alone, however, ...


3

I personally think of it this way. 教える although meaning to teach, can be used in place of the English to tell. For example, 電話番号を教えてください。Please TELL me you phone number. 天体物理学{てんたいぶつりがく}について教えてください。Please TEACH me about Astrophysics In this instance please TEACH me your phone number would sound somewhat odd (similar to I never want to forget your ...


3

Both 揃う and 集める include objects or living being coming together at one location, but there's an important difference: 集(め・ま)る is more or less a neutral collection 揃う on the other hand includes a connotation of the collection being sufficient or complete  You can 集める the pieces of a puzzle and end up with 1000 out of 1500, with 500 missing; but if the ...


3

As @l'électeur asked, what is the context? It could mean This is a Video, isn't it? It could also mean This is a video as if introducing some long lost technology. It could also show some kind of small astonishment like having found a video where they were expecting something else Oh! A video! When addressing something you are confident is a ...


3

In my expererience and from some research I did for an essay back in University, this stems as a large part of the "Westernisation" of Japanese words in the lead up to and immediately following the 1964 Tokyo Olympics in preparation for the influx of foreigners that were expected as well as a slight difference in meanings. JR (Then JNR) changed all it's ...


3

As a beginner, you would not need to know any of the three words if you want to know the truth. Seriously, you would clearly need to know at least a few thousand other words already to use any one of those three correctly and naturally in a sentence. Above is my answer in all honesty, but in case you insist... 「租借」 is the leasing of a territory between ...


3

碑文に記されているところによれば Without furigana, I would read this as 碑文にしるされているところによれば without hesitation. 記【しる】す is already a stiff word, which is suitable for the inscription on the tombstone. 記【き】する is very uncommon and sounds even stiffer to me. Probably there is no meaningful semantic difference from 記【しる】す. (Of course, there are many common compounds using 記, ...


3

Adding to the other answers and regarding the phrase あつい水, I'd like note this is possible in certain contexts. An article on Tokyo Language Center: 誤用?「熱い水」 「地球の環境」がテーマの番組で、深海を探査するシーンで「摂氏200度をこえる熱い水がふきだしている」というフレーズが聞こえてきました。 このシーンでは「摂氏200度をこえるお湯」はそぐわないんですね。なんか科学的な雰囲気が壊れてしまい、「温泉でのんびり」という感じになってしまいそうで・・・ ...


2

The correct one is 幸せにする, because する is usually the causative form of なる/である. But it seems that when the object is a person, させる is often used instead of する as a light verb. うれしくさせたい つらい思いをさせないで 幸せな気持ちにさせる する, なる, である, etc. are used in the active sense. 好きにしろ つらい思いをする 幸せな気持ちになりたい So it is understandable that some people may say 幸せにさせる unconsciously.


2

This is a good example of how bilingual dictionaries can become pretty useless at times. They just give you the counterparts in the other language; They do not define the words for you. 「根気」 is the will power that one needs to have in order to continue doing the same thing for an extended period of time. Close to "untiringness". 「忍耐」 means enduring one's ...


2

Generally speaking, 「無くす」 would be a more versatile word than 「失う」 as the latter is a more nuanced word. While 「無くす」 is an everyday word that even toddlers can use actively and correctly, you will not see small kids using the word 「失う」 in real life. I think it safe to say that 「失う」 is used more often in writing than in speaking. Only 「無くす」 can be used to ...


2

No subtleties, just grammar. First, 相関 stands for "correlation" as noun and "to correlate" as verb. Now, × 国民の平均身長は栄養状態と相関だ。 It's an ungrammatical sentence because Japanese postpositions can't modify noun by its own, contrary to English prepositions (but similarly to that of Latin & Romance languages). Grammatical ones are: (a) ...


2

You can interpret it as 『国民の栄養状態は平均身長と相関』だ but the 国民の栄養状態は平均身長と相関 part is still imcomplete sentence. Likewise, 「『Windows 10はRaspberry Piと対応』ですか?」 So, it's different from 相関している or 対応している.


2

Actually じゃ、また is the abbreviated form of では[Indicate changing the subject of conversation]、また(again)今度(next time)会いましょう(meet) which, altogether, gives "See (you) again next time".


2

Do 〜によると and 〜によれば have similar meanings at all? Yes, very much so. In fact, in informal speech between two individuals, the two are largely, if not completely, interchangeable. We just do not hold each other responsible for word choices like these. In the media, however, the distinction is made more often and more strictly than in people's daily ...


1

As others have pointed out, there are many ways that one can say farewell. However, you seem interested in the shortest, most common way to say it casually. This is the phrase that you want: じゃね! To clarify, the phrase 「じゃ、またね!」is used in the same way we might say "Ok, see you later!" in English. The また part carries the meaning of "later". If you ...


1

For your situation you will want to use あげる, which is used when the recipient is not in your social circle. The giver can be anyone. Take note of social status too. If the recipient is socially superior the giver, then you should use 差し上げる(さしあげる), but you don't have to. When the recipient is socially equal, or slightly lower, then you use あげる。 If the ...



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