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15

I am ハーフ, and for what it's worth the term has never caused me to take offense, nor did it seem like any was ever intended. When I was in elementary school in Japan, if I got into scuffles, the preferred label was 外人, though not even that is necessarily offensive outside of the context of a schoolyard spat. In short, if you aren't immediately offended by ...


12

I think most people don't even know whether a word is wasei-eigo. Just to give you a sense, there are plenty of people who think パン, バイト, and アベック come from English. I think most won't care if they find that out (which they do because sometimes the TV discusses this. For most people it's just another trivia). Just think about how popular ルー大柴 was ;) I'm ...


5

After reviewing Wikipedia article 語種, which states that a word is either 和語【わご】, 漢語【かんご】, 外来語, or 混種語【こんしゅご】, I can safely answer that 電子レンジ belongs to 混種語 group. A 混種語 (mixed type word) is a combination of two or more words (hence, is also a 複合語【ふくごうご】) of differing categories 和語, 漢語, 外来語. 和語: native Japanese, which include most 動詞 and 形容詞. Includes ...


5

From what I've seen it doesn't seem derogatory. Same goes for the 2nd-generation Japanese from Brazil as well with the word "Nikei" Just make sure you don't say "New Half" as that will surely upset your boss. Edit: Apparently it WAS derogatory back in the day when there weren't many foreigners in Japan, but and thus changed and is no longer seen as a ...


4

You already know what these signs mean, but let me try to answer your specific question: Are these wasei-eigo? A short answer is “probably no.” Recall that a wasei-eigo is a word which looks like a loanword from English but in fact is made in Japan. Although the signs B2F, B1F, 1F, 2F, and so on are specific to Japan (and possibly some other ...


4

This may be an answer to Derek's comment rather than to Andrew's original question. They are commonly written on walls right in front of an elevator, stairs, or an escalator, or on elevator buttons. They stand for Basement 2nd Floor, Basement 1st Floor, 1st Floor, 2nd Floor, as Andrew wrote. In Japanese, when words are abbreviated, they are usually ...


4

I agree with Enno Shioji that wasei-eigo is looked down upon by some people just as anything is looked down upon by someone. I just want to add that in some cases, the standard way to express some notion is by using wasei-eigo, and avoiding wasei-eigo is impossible. For example, baseball terminology in Japanese is full of wasei-eigo: フォアボール (base on ...


3

At least in daily life, there is no word マイ・ワイフ or マイワイフ. The prefix マイ means "personal (property)" or "private (property)" as opposed to "public" such as マイカー "privately owned car (as opposed to public transportation or company owned vehicles)" or マイマヨネーズ "mayonaise personally carried into restaurants (as opposed to those that restaurants are equipped ...


3

There is a disagreement between Troyen and Derek, and I am not sure to determine which is correct, so I will give two possibilities: If it is the case, as you suggest, that there is no (compound) word as gas range in English, then ガスレンジ would be an instance of 和製英語. If on the other hand, as Derek suggests, an English compound word gas range was incorporated ...


3

No, this is not derogatory. We put our culture on top of the word and assume, which is a fair assumption because I don't like using at all, that it is not cool. But I have had this conversation a few times now after seeing old Japanese ladies talk about being half and using the word with the child's parents. I even remember reading about the word in a ...


3

To most Japanese, it is not seen as derogatory. But then, they do a lot of racist things without thinking that it's wrong. If you want a lot of examples, read the blog Loco in Yokohama. He's a black ALT in Japan and he chronicles the things that anger him almost on a daily basis, like the empty circle that surrounds gaijin on trains while the whole rest ...


2

Japanese also called ガール as ギャル, but the word ギャル is taken by blackish/brownish (may be sun-burn or make-ups) girls, see the ギャル on Wikipedia. So, I guess someone start using ガール as normal girls. And I think ガールズ comes from something like popular 東京ガールズコレクション (Tokyo Girls Collection) fashion show or ガールズトーク (girls talk). And also ガール、ガールズ has some good ...


2

As an American, it strikes me as incredibly offensive. After all, half is even less than three-fifths. That being said, ハーフ is a perfect example of wasei-eigo; a Japanese word based on English which a native English speaker would either find odd or not be able to make sense of at all. The context that a Japanese person is going to have when using the ...


2

I think they look down on loanwords which replace the local words which were in normal usage. I don't think think they'd have anything against words like パン or バス (the vehicle one). Rather it's words like バス (the bathtub. 風呂) or マイカー (自分の車. 我が車? 我車?). It makes you want to exclaim "Why the heck are you using such fancy words when there is already a word to ...


2

Many hits for this word are from Australia and about people who share a room/apartment. For example: オウンキーは1人づつ持たせてもらっているのですが エレベーター操作ができるスワイプキーはシェア。 So, apparently オウンキー means that you don't have to share the key with someone else living in the same place. EDIT: in fact, the term seems to have been borrowed from English (1, 2) and not invented by ...


2

Do you think it reasonable that it was a fixed English expression, referring to consecutive public holidays, which has fallen out of use after the Japanese picked up the term from English? I think "golden week" is perfectly good English and makes some sense when one understands "golden" to be a synonym for "happy, prosperous, peaceful" (e.g. The Free ...


2

Well there is this open paper English Loanwords in Japanese (Gillian Kay,1995) that has a nice short summary on The function of English Loanwords in the Japanese Language (3rd to last page of PDF) that I paraphrase here: The existence of many loanwords which have Japanese equivalents provides an alternative tone of discourse. Loanwords are sometimes used ...


1

It means what it says, but the severity of the accusation changes by context, perhaps this is because it is a non-indigenous imported word, although most know what it means, the social context has not been set as a norm, it could be a dead serious accusation, or just said lightly as in saying "stop hitting on me", who says it, and how matter. If you are to ...


1

Usage of マイ is pretty important, but ケースバイケース as pointed out above. For example, back in the '80s マイペース トレーニング was commonly heard on TV sumo commentary to describe those wrestlers who took a (too) leisurely approach to training. If you're living in Japan and using TV as study resource, you can drop this kind of thing into conversation to gain respect ...



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