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(See the other answers for translate vs. transliterate.) It's due to Japanese's syllable structure. English allows some spectacularly complicated syllables (strengths being a good maximal example*), but Japanese doesn't - its allowed syllable structure is (C)V(N/Q), where C is any consonant, V is any vowel, N is the nasal ん (which can vary in pronunciation ...


5

First off, by 'translate' I assume you mean 'transliterate', to convert text from one script to another. I apologize if this is not what you meant to ask. "猫 = cat" would be a translation; "猫 = neko" would be a transliteration. To answer the question, Japanese is made up of syllables, all but one of which are vowels (a, i, u, e, o) or a combination of a ...


3

They are all variations of the same word. The only difference here is the degree of emphasis and where the emphasis is. For example, "っ" in "すっ" just represents a bit of pause between "す" and "げ". "ぇ", "え", and "ー" all represent dragging of the "げ" sound, but "ー" is longer than "え", and "ぇ" is a very short addition. None is more correct than others, and the ...


2

No, it's not true. Counterexample 剣 translates to "sword", which does not end in a vowel. Even when Japanese is transliterated into English, it's not true. Counterexample [剣]{けん} is transliterated as "ken" or "kenn", which does not end in a vowel. What is true, is that many Japanese words, when transliterated into ローマ字 (Latin alphabet) do end ...



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