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It is very natural to interpret the sentence in the first way, as a Japanese native speaker. However, the punctuation is not correct. ハイリアの民は、ふしぎな力を あやつることができた、と言います。 is more correct. If you would like to say in the latter manner, the following sentences are appropriate: in a present sense, ハイリアの民は、ふしぎな力を あやつることできる、と言っています。 or, in a past sense, ...


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I would say ボブさんは、物価が高いと思っている。(casual form) ボブさんは、物価が高いと思っています。(polite form) (not *ボブさんは、物価が高いと思う。/ *ボブさんは、物価が高いと思います。) to say "Bob thinks that prices are high", ボブさんは、物価が高いと思っているようだ。(casual form) ボブさんは、物価が高いと思っているようです。(polite form) to say "It seems that Bob thinks prices are high", and ボブさんによれば、物価が高いそうだ。(casual form) ...


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I think #2 is a little more natural especially in everyday conversation. However, #1 is still often found in articles or such. off-topic: If you want to use ~によれば, it's 「…によれば今の…では株価が高い。」, 「・・・株価が高いそうだ」 or 「・・・株価が高いとのこと(だ)」 Bobさんによれば株価が高いと思っている(ようだ) means "Bob said he/she (not Bob himself) thinks stock price is high for the current economy".


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The difference is very subtle, but there is a difference. With と言います, it sounds as if the myth is actually true or people somehow believe it. With と言われています, it sounds as if it is an actual myth. There is no rule that says you must use と言われています when indicating a myth. I've never played the game, but you can probably infer that the maiden actually believes ...


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奏でる, which is the verb “to play” when talking about, among other instruments, the guitar (can also use 弾く、かき鳴らす) and the violin. You should also note for future reference that the only way a verb can end with an え-row kana and then たり is if たり replaced る.


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Yes, it can. I remember my teacher at school (here in Japan) sometimes using 頑張りましょう when talking about activities that he would not directly take part in. He was however peripherally involved, like being the one setting the test he was referring to with his 頑張りましょう。 I'd say that there needs to be at least a link between the person using this form and the ...


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Xがする is a phrasal verb and is most often used in phrases such as 音がする and 匂い{におい}がする and even 気がする. It is used with words that are about perceiving or sensing something. (More phrasal verbs here.) Yet it does not really require the actual sensing part from the part of the speaker, but instead is a pretty objective way of saying that 'there is a smell' or ...


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は is normally used a subject marker, but its also used for emphasis by slightly subverting its standard usage. When used this way, it's usually to show contrast the object with some other object. In your example sentence (その覚悟はしてました), the speaker indicates that they're prepared for the eventuality that their conversation partner just mentioned, but maybe ...


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足れり is basically the Old/Middle Japanese version of what in Modern Japanese would be 足りている. It consists of 足り (the ren'youkei of 足る) plus あり (modern ある). (It's not 足りあり because of Old Japanese's vowel cluster mergers: /ia/ > /e/.) Modern Japanese 足りている has exactly the same structure as the Middle Japanese version, just with a different conjunction form (-て ...



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