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5

I wanted to say "I want to hear Asuka-chan play the piano!" The easiest and most common way to say that would be by nominalizing Asuka's action of playing the piano. How do we do that? It is very simple. First, form a regular sentence meaning "Asuka plays the piano." 「あすかちゃんはピアノを[弾]{ひ}く」 Now, change the 「は」 to 「が」 and add 「の」 at the very end. ...


4

Why do we prefer た form here? It's because those animals are familiar and easy to concretely imagine. non-た form represents that something has not happened yet but is going to happen. On the other hand, た form represents that something has happened. In short, non-た form feels obscure while た form feels more vivid. For example, when you pull up a fish, you ...


1

The verbal auxiliary た represents past and completion and this た is used as completion. As your teacher says, I think 使った言い方 is more common. And た which means completion can be used for a future thing. For example, 来週の金曜日に、仕事が終わったら、お酒を飲みましょう (Let's drink after work next Friday).


3

I agree that James Scott Tayler's answer is correct, however strictly speaking the verbs could also be in the dictionary form. For example: 旅行するの(が)好きだし、映画を見るのも好きです. I like traveling, and I also like watching movies


7

If you are listing multiple actions in a set (eg. of things you like) then you would use verb+たり〜verb+たりするのが好き. 旅行したり、映画を見たりするのが好きです。 I like to do things like watching movies and travelling. Your initial sentence reads like the two actions are connected. As you like to first travel somewhere and then watch a movie there.


5

First, Group III is the easiest to devide because 来{く}る and する are the only verbs that belong to it. These verbs have each irregular conjugation as you probably know. Then, if the verb ends with another than ''る'', it belongs to Group I. For example, you can tell which group 行{い}く belongs to, because it ends with ''く'' which is another than ''る''. Yes, ...


5

I wanted to add on to 変幻出没's post by clarifying the Group I (godan) verb exceptions - not only do they end in る, they all end in える and いる, but are actually Group I rather than Group II (ichidan). (Not to say that Japanese should be studied purely for the JLPT, but this information is relevant to your N4 studies: there are a finite number of Group I ...


-1

You don't need to know what 'group' a verb is in. That's a completely abstract way to think about verbs that is just a made up construct used to explain things in an academic setting. It really slows you down if you have to stop mid sentence to think about what 'group' a verb is in. Instead you want to be able to recognize it on the subconscious level and ...


6

Japanese verbs can be divided into three groups (godan verbs, ichidan verbs and irregular verbs). Nevertheless, the -ます form is not the best to tell them apart. Godan verbs (Group I) ends in く、ぐ、う、ぶ、る、ぬ、つ、む、す. Examples are: 行{い}く、泳{およ}ぐ、買{か}う、遊{あそ}ぶ、上{あ}がる、死{し}ぬ、待{ま}つ、読{よ}む、話{はな}す. There is some overlapping with verb ending in る.I mean that you have to ...


1

"~しに行く" = the 連用形(continuative form) of a verb + に行く and it means "go ~ing", so 見に行く = 見 (the 連用形 of 見る) + に行く. The "には" of "the 連体形(attributive form) of a verb + には" is used for the object of the action. For example, 車が走るには、ガソリンが必要です.


-1

Because it's 見るには and not verb + に + いく。They're completely different things. Verb + には is it's own thing. It means like 'in order to x / to accomplish x'. This is something that is extremely unintuitive at first but it makes a bit more sense when you think about how には is used with regards to physical objects. には is used to indicate that something is inside ...


0

The above answers are very nuanced and detailed but if the question is how to modify a noun with a verb in Japanese the basic answer is fairly straight forward. The plain form of a verb in non-past, past, non-past negative, or past negative can be used to directly modify a noun. kuru hito = the person who comes, kita hito = the person who came, konai hito ...


6

In meaning, 「[信]{しん}じ[歩]{ある}く」= 「信じ、歩く」= 「信じて歩く」 ≒ 「信じて、(そして)[生]{い}きていく」 In other words, 「歩く」 does not necessarily mean "to walk" here. It is used metaphorically to mean "to live one's life (from here on)". 「いいの」=「いいのですか」=「いいのでしょうか」 It is in a question form and in this case, the speaker is asking himself a question. 「Verb + ば ...


4

It's not prohibited, but it never ever means what past tense in English does. Tense in Japanese subordinate clause is (basically) relative to main clause, so if you bought a book and the book was heavy, you just have to say 重い本を買いました. 重かった本を買いました suggests the book was heavy before you bought it. But there rarely are books that being sometimes heavy, ...


4

This sentence is unnatural. "I bought a book that was heavy" is translated as "重い本を買いました". Sequence of tenses isn't necessary in Japanese. For example, "I read an interesting book yesterday" is translated as "私は昨日、面白い本を読みました".


2

In your case, you are asking about a specific construct: the use of purposeに+verb of movement To express: Going somewhere to do something This pattern can take two kinds of objects as purpose: The ~ます stem of a verb: "Going somewhere to verb'. Note that is similar to nominalizing the verb, see for example this question. A noun: "Going ...


0

There's no causal link between the two sentences. It just simply says, "He hasn't studied English; he can't even read the alphabet." There's no particular reason to assume an inability to speak English would entail a lack of knowledge about the alphabet.


1

[verb in masu-form + に行く] essentially means go to {place} to do {verb} So, in this case : おじいさんは山に行く。 The old man is going to the mountain 何故山に行くのか? Why is he going to the mountain? 木を切りに行く。 He's going to chop wood Does that make things a little clearer?


1

It's the continuative form (連用形) of i-adjectives (形容詞). It's the same as the て形 in this case. It is just that in formal writing the rule is to use 連用形 instead of て形.


3

This is actually a masculine-ish way to say 'there's no need, is there?' It's the product of two phenomena: First, it's common to ask questions you expect a 'yes' answer to with some sort of negation marker (different negator choices create different connotations); when you expect a 'no' answer, you do the same thing to a negative verb. Thus: Expected ...


4

It's colloquialism of 買う必要なくない?, which is double negation ("Isn't it needless to buy?"). The former ない has conjugated to the adverbial form なく to modify the latter ない.


0

What you're seeing in these sentences is most likely omission. The full sentence would be: ミトが要らないなら買う必要なくなる Click here for a more detailed explanation of this form EDIT: なくない didn't come into mind when I was answering, but thinking about it now I believe it's more likely than なくなる(although I have seen such omissions before).


5

覚える means to memorize something, and 覚えている means that someone remembers something. Your first sentence means I will memorize his ex-girlfriend's name. If you want to say ''I will memorize and will not forget her name'', you can also say 覚えておく/覚えておきます. 覚えます is also used when you say the feature or the nature of someone (e.g. 彼は人の名前をすぐ覚えます。), however, your ...


4

In Japanese, the て+いる form does not necessarily represent present-progressive (as such a concept doesn't really exist in Japanese in the first place); in many cases, it describes a resultant or enduring state. In this case, the verb is "to remember/learn," so using the て+いる form implies a "state" of having already learned something (and remembering it). The ...


1

送る: To escort someone somewhere (and part from him/her after arriving there). Escorting itself is the main goal, and you usually have nothing do to at the destination place. 子どもを学校に送る 友人を駅まで送った (because it was late, and I said goodbye to him and returned home) 連れて行く: To take someone somewhere (in order to do something there with him/her). ...



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