Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

The conditional -(r)eba has two forms: Following a consonant-stem verb, it takes the form of -eba: 行く   ik-u →  行けば   ik-eba 泳ぐ   oyog-u →  泳げば   oyog-eba 差す   sas-u →  差せば   sas-eba 放つ  hanat-u →  放てば  hanat-eba 死ぬ   sin-u →  死ねば   sin-eba 運ぶ  hakob-u →  運べば  hakob-eba 飲む   nom-u →  飲めば   nom-eba 走る  hasir-u →  走れば  hasir-eba 構う  ...


5

言われば is not correct. You should use 言われれば (or 言われたら). is the second part trying to say "If told to look, I'll look"? Yes, I think you're right. 言われれば consists of 言わ(未然形 of 動詞「言う」) + れれ(仮定形 of 助動詞「れる」) + ば(接続助詞).


4

やる(≒する) → やり + ~おえる やり is not a prefix, rather おえる is one of a great many productive verb suffixes. Moreover, in this case using just 終える sounds a bit strange to me (not native though). Your final examples are the same as asking what the difference is between "be sure to check off what you've finished" vs "finished doing".


1

I would like to add some numbers, now that we can easily search for tags with the new beta jisho. http://beta.jisho.org/search/*しる%20%23v1, for example, searches for 一段 verbs ending on しる. [ending]: [五段 verbs], [一段 verbs], [一段 verbs with more than 1 syllable without the final る] Note that the last count does not include compound verbs such as 見飽きる, 言いすぎる, ...


1

As James said, without knowing the group of the verb, you can't really guess. Note that this is also true for the inverse step : i.e. you cannot, simply from the dictionary form guess what is the ます-form nor the て-form. From there, look for go-dan (五段) or ichi-dan (一段) in your dictionary. During my studies, my teacher also reffered to them as "strong" and ...


2

As you may know, Japanese verbs are either godan (five step) or ichidan (one step) verbs. Godan Verbs: remove the masu e.g. ikimasu -> iki then change the final syllable to a 'u' sound, e.g. iki -> iku other examples: iimasu -> ii -> iu nomimasu -> nomi -> nomu Ichidan verbs: remove the masu ...


2

You are correct, linking two verb in their 連体形 ("dictionary") form is unusual and unexpected. Both of the dictionaries 日本国語大辞典 and 広辞苑 suggest the following explanation: 「観智院本名義抄」や「色葉字類抄」で「翔」を「ふるまふ」と読んでいることから「羽を存分に振って自由舞う」という「振るい舞う」が原義かとおもわれる。 That is, it is a shortening of the original form huruimau, in the sense of a bird flapping its wings and ...


1

Your recognition is totally right. Here are some examples and differences. もらいました 私{わたし}は父{ちち}から傘{かさ}をもらいました。 (I got an umbrella from my father.) You can see that the subject is 私 (I) and もらいました can be applied for this case. This sentence can imply that the person 私 asked his father to give an umbrella for him/her in several cases. くれました ...


1

~くれ The word, くれ, is a special word. The original form of this is くれる (呉れる) and the imperative form is くれろ, while it's a deprecated expression. According to Daijirin: 〔命令形は「くれ」が普通〕 その動作者{どうさしゃ}が話{はな}し手{て}または話題{わだい}の人物{じんぶつ}のために何{なん}らかの動作{どうさ}をすることを表{あらわ}す (Translation: [くれ is general in imperative form] This means that the hearer do ...


1

勝つ To win, to beat someone. You use this word if you are convinced you will / can win. グーはチョキに勝{か}つ。 Rock beats scissors. 誘惑{ゆうわく}に勝{か}つ。I'll beat the temptation. レッドソックスが勝{か}つだろう。The red socks will win for sure. 勝てる (Potential form of 勝つ) Could win. Maybe can win. If there's a chance of losing it's better to use this one. ...


1

This probably isn't the answer you were looking for, but: it has to be differentiated using context (via. the subject of the sentence, as well as circumstance). While this is probably pretty obvious, to break it out a little: If you say 「(太郎さん、)明日のパーティーに出られますか?」 to your coworker 太郎, it is pretty unambiguously the potential. If you say ...



Top 50 recent answers are included