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Your sentence 私{わたし}は水曜日{すいようび}にアルバイトがあります。 is absolutely correct sentence to say I have a part-time job on Wednesday. (or "I have to do a part-time job on Wednesday"). You can choose whether adding わたしは to the sentence or not. Both sentences make sense and natural sentences for me. 「水曜日{すいようび}にアルバイトがあります。」 is, if anything, preferable because ...


-4

Seeing as the particle に can indicate the location of a short-term event, you are able to use the verb ある to indicate that you have to do something on a certain day. However, I would structure it something like this: [day of the week]、私{わたし}は [noun] に あります。 Or in your case: 水曜日{すいようび}、私{わたし}は アルバイト に あります。


6

Yes it's a sentence-ending particle which is usually used in monologues. One article says the main function of this っと is to casually convince/confirm something to the speaker themselves. Perhaps it's like saying 'okay' to yourself. これで良しっと。 今日も1日お疲れさまでしたっと。 (before going to bed, to oneself) Occasionally it's used when there's an actual ...


0

I might be wrong, but it sounds to me like a shortened version of と思います, something like "I think I will...". 「英語でブログを書いてみようと思いました。」 I thought about writing a blog in English.


2

<1> Yes, いず does not sound natural in this context. <2> 立ってはおらず has the same meaning as 立ってはいるのではなくて <3> It does sound more formal, but the nuance does not really change. I would loosly translate it like this: It's not that you are alone; a sense of self-awareness first comes from being surrounded by others.


2

It's 年{とし}が行{い}く. The set phrase means "grow old". And it's not three-year-old "old" but really advanced in years. There's a similar expression 年{とし}を取{と}る, whereas 年が行く suggests more like the speaker is talking from younger eyes, in my personal sense.


7

That depends on context. (After/Once) I wake up, I feed my cat. 起きたら、猫にえさをやる。 (The order/sequence is) after I wake up, I feed my cat. or (Only) after I wake up, I feed my cat. 起きてから、猫にえさをやる。 (After) I wake up, (then) I feed my cat. 起きた後(で)、猫にえさをやる。 PS △ 起きると、猫にえさをやる。 is unnatural, especially for talking about your own actions. ...


3

I feel that the forms in David's answer are a bit uncommon. I'd just use a plain 〜たら: 朝起きたら、猫にエサをやる。 When I wake up in the morning, I feed my cat.


3

I try to be simple, but there's always something need explanation. Should I add "ka" at the end of a sentence? Or just replace "desu" and "deshita" with "da" and "datta"? Grammatically you can have them (see @snailboat's answer), but I'm not sure if you should. The reason is that, plain form + ka often sounds too harsh, unless you're a manly man ...


3

I'm going to try to do two things in this answer. First, I'm going to try to address the tangle of terms and theories that have got you confused. (So this answer will unfortunately be rather long!) Second, I'll try to address the specific question of 誘う. Feel free to skip any section that doesn't look immediately helpful :-) What do '-u verb' and ...


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All of desu, deshita, and datta appear normally before ka. But da is an exception. In main clauses (like your examples), da is deleted before ka: desu + ka →   desu ka deshita + ka → deshita ka da + ka →   ka datta + ka →  datta ka In subordinate clauses (like [dare da ka] shiranai), da sometimes appears before ka. ...


2

さそえる would be a ru-verb, but さそう doesn't even end in る, and its stem is saso(w)-, which when joined to -areru gives sasowareru さそわれる. Recall, if the word ends in anything but -iru or -eru it's a "consonant stem" verb and you get the stem by deleting the final vowel. This includes verbs ending in -(w)u, where you only see the consonant if the stem is ...


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The -te form comes with a second verb, unless you have a command like "ganbatte!". You can put the politeness and past tense in the second verb: 日本に住んでいる 日本に住んでいた 日本に住んでいます 日本に住んでいました If you have -tai, I recommend thinking of it like an i-adjective. The conjugations, similar to above, are as follows: 日本に住みたい 日本に住みたかった 日本に住みたいです 日本に住みたかったです I'm not ...


1

Another phrase for "reason" is "in order to", which is usually constructed with (の)ために. The shorter version of that is (の)に. 私は日本語の[新聞]{しんぶん}を[読]{よ}むのに[辞書]{じしょ}を[使]{つか}う。 watashi ha nihongo no shinbun wo yomu no ni jisho wo tsukau. In order to read Japanese newspaper, I use a dictionary. That's the grammar point used in your first sentence "sentaku ni ...


2

You have several possibilites to do this. The most used are: Verb + と + action afterwards. This is a good choice, if you want to list many subsequent events. The verb must be in the present tense. If you still want to speak about the past, make the part after と in past tense. Verb + [後]{あと}で + action afterwards. The focus here is on the previous event ...


2

In fact, 必要 is not a verb, but a noun. It can be an adjective if it is followed by な. As a noun, 必要 means "a necessity" or "a need". As an adjective, it means "necessary" or "needed". そんなに高いパソコン買う必要ありますか? Is there a necessity to buy such an expensive computer? たくさんの文献を読む必要がある。 There is a necessity to read a lot of literature. ログインが必要です。 The ...


10

Can you say "日本語する"? I suppose you can use it idiomatically or somewhat playfully (perhaps akin to something like "I'm Japanese-ing it up"), but it's not a real verb that is used. If the answer is no, how can "日本語できる" be grammatically correct? Without realizing it, you are actually saying "日本語が分かることができます。". 日本語できる is really just dropping the が ...


2

Is this sentence correct? Yes, your sentence is perfectly correct. and Is there another meaning that makes sense that I don't know? Yes, there are many meanings of する suru (Wiktionary). Your sentence falls under definition 11. From the link: 11(修飾語 + 体の一部 + をする)その人の特徴として、そのようなものを持つ。 青い目をした少女。 あの子は長い髪をしている。 Translated: 11 ...


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I believe this is the past conditional with -ている. Here are two good resources that will allow you to understand this grammar form and anything similar to it: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/teform http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/conditionals Friendly Ghost described the deconstruction of the meaning very well in his answer. In ...


2

間違っていたら、修正してください。 間違う means "to make a mistake" 間違って is the て form of 間違う 間違っている means "are/is making a mistake" 間違っていた is the た form of 間違っている and means "were/was making a mistake" 間違っていたら means "if I was making a mistake"


2

Don't try to freely create nouns from 連用形. There are many nouns that look the same as the 連用形 of the corresponding verbs, but such nouns were lexicalized long ago, and they often have different meanings derived from the original verb. You have to look up a dictionary each time. 話【はなし】 tale, story (rather than 'talking') 叩き this method of preparing foods in ...


3

As Japanese native: 積む feels like many things are loaded, and also feels that they are put on top of another (and I suppose that's what pile-up means). 載せる feels like putting something on top of certain base.


3

"山を登ったり、降りたり、よく考えた。" is an unnatural sentence. If it's something like 山を登ったり、降りたり、よく遊んだ, you can interpret that the concrete actions of playing include climbing or descending a mountain. Or, if it's 山を登ったり、降りたり、よく考えたりした, it means that you did many things including climbing and descending a mountain or thinking profoundly. "山を登ってって、降りてって、よく考えた。" is a ...


1

Rarely, yes. なる in your examples are all punctual usage and these なっている represent a resutative aspect. ①(もう)暗くなっている。 (The weather) has become already dark. ② 医者になっている。 (He/She) has become a doctor. ③ この部隊はXの指揮下になっている。This unit is in X's command. However, durative usage is possible when the subject is plural or collective, because collection of punctual ...



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