New answers tagged

0

Another expression I heard for "doing the hair" is 髪を結う{ゆう}, although in a context of a more elaborate hairstyle in which you actually tie the hair (髪を島田に結う). 結う 2 髪を整えて結ぶ。「桃割れを―・う」「ちょん髷(まげ)を―・う」 I'm not sure if there is any nuance in contemporary use.


5

We say simply "do my hair" "髪を整える." We don't say "髪をする." "寝癖" when it refers to hair, means the hair deshelved while you were sleeping, and "寝癖を直す" is used specifically for dressing your hair that became disheveled over night.  "髪をセットする" is more often used when you have your hair style set in a beauty parlor, like "今日美容院で髪をセットして貰った."


7

As pointed out in the comments by @chocolate, 髪をセットする is a good way to say "to do one's hair". It can involve blow-drying, applying hair wax etc. 髪型をセットする means "to fix one's hairstyle", which sounds reasonable if you always wear the same (elaborate) hairstyle. If you are among friends you can also say 寝癖を直す as @永劫回帰 suggests, meaning to get rid of the ...


4

知る means something more akin to "get to know". So by saying 電話番号を知ります you're saying that you "are getting to know something ", you don't know it yet. So if you're asking whether someone knows a number, then you have to use the form that reflects that current state of things. That's why you say 電話番号を知っています to mean you know something. This works very ...


1

In the same way as "襲わる" with "襲われる - be attacked", "奪わる" with "奪われる - be robbed of," "囚わる" with "囚われる- be captured," “さらわる” is a bit oldish way of saying “さらわれる,” which is a passive form of the verb, さらう, and you can put Kanji character, “攫う” to this. Kenkyusha's Japanese English Dictionary (英和中辞典:5th Edition) defines “攫う” as: 横合いから持ち去るーcarry away, sweep ...


7

There's a difference between intransitive and indirect. Transitivity (from Latin "transire", "to go across") basically (with exceptions, probably) implies the subject carrying out an action on an object that is generally distinct from the subject. Sure, you can select 自分 as the object to make the action reflexive, but in general you are able to select ...


2

To write さらわる with kanji: 攫わる (this is for the "kidnap" meaning of さらう) In Classical Japanese this was the verb さらふ which is conjugated with ハ行四段活用, like 言ふ. To make the passive form of さらふ you need to add the Classical Japanese 助動詞「る」 which attaches to the 未然形 (this is 「は」 for ハ行四段活用) Put さらふ into 未然形 ⇒「さらは」 Add 助動詞「る」⇒「さらはる」 Change the Kana to match ...


4

No, 見る and 諦めた方 are grammatically subjects, not adverbs in those sentences. Words marked with が should be nouns, of course. As you know, noun + がいい (lit. "~ is good", with exhaustive-listing ga) is usually used when you choose one thing from a few possible options. 「ラーメンとカレー、どっちがいい?」「ラーメンがいい。」 If you want to use this with two or more possible actions (...


1

見るがいい。means "Why don't you take a look at it?" 見たほうがいい。means "You'd better take a look at it." 諦めるがいい。means "Just give up on it." 諦めたほうがいい。 means "You'd better give up on it."


1

この記事についてのご意見をお聞かせください。 Please tell me your opinion about this article. 新しい事業計画につき、これから御説明いたします。 Now I'd like to talk about the new project plan. Not interchangeable in the first sentence due to the の after について. But this would be fine: 新しい事業計画について、これから御説明いたします。 Now I'd like to talk about the new project plan. Also, 「につき」has an additional ...


2

Yes, it is interchangeable and we use usually してくれ now. About this おくれ, it has two opinions. One is お in おくれ is 美化語 like お食べ and another is おくれなさい omitted なさい. And it is a dialect of Wakayama prefecture. http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%97%E3%81%A6%E3%81%8A%E3%81%8F%E3%82%8C


7

The verb is usually written 落とす. 落す is a much less common variant (which is not an official reading: 落: ラク、お-ちる、お-とす). The BCCWJ has 落とす 1657 results 落す  130 results One way to remember the okurigana is to note that the reading of the kanji should be short enough, i.e. the okurigana should be long enough, to accommodate all transitive/intransitive ...


1

dictionary-form + ことにする means "to decide to ~", and dictionary-form + ~ことにしている means "I always ~", "It's my policy to ~", "I make a habit of ~ing", etc. 私は子供に、自分のことは自分でさせることにしている。 It's my policy to make my child take care of himself. (lit. "make my child do his own things") 10時に駅で待ち合わせるということにしませんか。 Shall (we) meet at the station at 10 o'clock ...


2

It's worth noting that ‑zuru forms are historically older than the ‑jiru forms. This might account for the sense l'électeur notes, that the ‑jiru forms come across as "lighter", "less literary", "less formal", etc. How the forms developed Historically, there are many terms that started out as compounds, where a noun or a borrowing ...


1

Interchangeable. Just a minor difference in pronunciation. Perhaps it's an [音便]{おんびん} thing


1

I take your quote. ”メーラーの設定によってクリックのみでは正しく開けない場合があります” as; Depending on the setting on the part of the mail sender, there is a case that you cannot open the file simply by clicking (the mouse). 1.“みで” should be “のみで” meaning “only by (clicking). 2."正しく開けない" means “unable to open (the file) properly. "メーラー" should be “mailer / mail sender.”



Top 50 recent answers are included