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1

「カンニングをしているところを [見]{み}つかる。」= "I am found cheating (on the test)." This sentence is 100% grammatical. If you analyzed it using the grammar of another language, however, it might look as though it were ungrammatical. 「見つかる」 , as you stated, is an intransitive verb, but it happens to fall into a group of intransitive verbs that hold the ...


1

I've found an explanation on how tense switching works here: A part of a past event (often a state rather than an action) can be described using the nonpast tense, if the writer perceives it to be relatively unimportant circumstantial information that has no direct bearing upon the major story line. Just in case, I've scanned the relevant bits that ...


2

I would say : instead of presenting it as a simple given event, he summarizes the beginning of the match, kind of headlining what happened during this opening, making it last longer in the readers mind. So you could say it is a historic present.


4

"Each theory has a different understanding of how countries like China, Japan and South Korea behave towards each other." 「[互]{たが}いの[理論]{りろん}はなぜのような[国]{くに}[中国]{ちゅうごく}や、[日本]{にほん}や、[韓国]{かんこく}を[始]{はじ}め、[互]{たが}いに[振]{ふ}る[舞]{ま}ることが[分]{わ}かることの[違]{ちが}っています。」 Vocabulary & Collocation: 1) How many theories are there in total? 「互いの理論」 would generally ...


4

I have to say your composition has many grammatical/vocabulary flaws and hardly makes sense, but I would try to show you some hints here: のような国 has to come after 中国や、日本や、韓国 "has a different understanding" → 異なる理解を持っています. Simple literal translation suits here. "how" → どのように, not なぜ (why). Plus, a か after the verb (振る舞う) has to come with it. The ...


2

I can't say assertively without seeing the context, but your interpretation of (1) seems wrong. "取り入れた外気は血液に" is missing a verb. You are right. But what's missing here is, I guess, "送られる," "流れ込む," "吸収される,"or something. If so, this sentence is explaining how human body takes oxygen from the air into the blood. Why do they omit verbs once in a while? One ...


2

For example, "Tabemashita" vs "Tabeta" - both mean something has been eaten? Yes. They do not differ in meaning, only usage. Keep in mind there are some times when it's inappropriate to use たべた (tabeta); typically these are in more formal (or less familiar) situations. Conversely, there are times when it is inappropriate to use たべました (tabemashita); ...


11

「[連用形]{れんようけい} of a verb + (small っ) + こ」 = "performing the same action to/for/with one another" 「見せ」 is the 連用形 of the verb 「見せる = "to show"」. 「こ」 is a suffix that sort of functions as a nominalizer while giving the verb a meaning of doing the same thing among two or more persons as a competition, game or just fun. See こ[接尾]1 in : ...


0

根付いていた。In this case, 根 means tree's root. If tree's root grew deep into the ground, the tree can bear against strong wind. 根付いていた means two thing are tightly coupled. 松の木は、強く根付くので、風に強い。 It means pine tree has deep root under the ground. therefore it has good resistance against strong wind. (It also the pint tree and the ground are tightly coupled.) ...


1

Carrying 持っている exists ある Rough example: You would not say "I am carrying my arm" but you would say "I am carrying an apple" 鉛筆 がある (enpitsu ga aru) means "There is a pencil" and can also mean "I've got a pencil"


5

Not-so-young native speaker here. I personally have never used 「verb + たまえ」 myself or had another person say something to me using that structure. The only places that I have actually heard it used have been: Fiction (films, dramas, plays, novels, etc.) and Religious sermons In fiction, adult male speakers sometimes use 「verb + たまえ」 as a somewhat ...



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