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1

This probably isn't the answer you were looking for, but: it has to be differentiated using context (via. the subject of the sentence, as well as circumstance). While this is probably pretty obvious, to break it out a little: If you say 「(太郎さん、)明日のパーティーに出られますか?」 to your coworker 太郎, it is pretty unambiguously the potential. If you say ...


2

I don't know if this answers your question but I would say them as: 昨日、テスト勉強(を)しているときに、彼女が来た。 Yesterday she came (to my place) while I was studying for a test. 昨夜、あなたが電話してきたとき、私は勉強していた。 I was studying when you called me last night. 私達がその本のことを初めて話したときには、もう私は一週間それを読んでいた。 By the time we first talked about that book, I had already been ...


6

Here is a linguistic supplement to @naruto's answer: This 「たって」 connects to the 連用形{れんようけい} (continuative form) of words. This is not immediately clear because of the euphonic changes that take place. This is what happens when 「たって」 connects to 「言う」:   //iwu//の連用形+//tatte// ⇒   { inflect }   //iwi//+//tatte// ⇒   { //i// in //wi// devoices; ...


7

This たって is the same as たって (≒even if, even though) in 雨が降ったって出掛けるよ. The difference is that なく (te-form of ない) is inserted between the main verb (=言う) and たって. (And of course 言う is in its nai-form before ない) 言わなくたって分かるよ。 Even if you don't say it, (I/he) can understand. 言ったって分からないよ。 Even if you say it, (I/he) can't understand. The literal ...


1

The word is nar-an, a negated form of the verb なる. The standard negation of the verb may be known to you as ならない. The utterance you ask about can be rephrased as 早く日曜日にならないかな.


0

They can be summarized like this: ( I=intransitive verb / T=transitive verb / TP=potential form of the transitive verb ) I: きこえる "can be heard" / T: きく "hear" / TP: きける "can hear" I: みえる "can be seen" / T: みる "see" / TP: (みられる or みれる) "can see" So this is the picture. However one point somewhat confusing is the (みられる or みれる) part, where lexically ...


-2

みえます Maybe, I think that your understanding is correct. みまられます The word "みまられます" is not. Did you mean "みられます" ? Can you show me an example sentence? きけます (= can listen) eg: あなたはストーリーをきけます。 You can listen to the story . きこえます (=hear) eg: 海の音がきこえます。 We can hear the ocean from here. 何か音がきこえますか? Do you hear any sound?


3

見える To be visible, to be in sight. あそこに高{たか}い山{やま}が見える。 A tall mountain can be seen over there. 僕{ぼく}にはあなたが見える。 You are visible to me / I can see you. to look like. 僕にはその雲{くも}がわたあめに見える。 That cloud looks like cotton candy to me. 見える is about objects being visible and not so much about one's ability to to see them. Obviously, if an ...


3

思い付く and 思い浮かぶ are compound verbs (複合動詞;ふくごうどうし) - [思う + 付く] and [思う + 浮かぶ]. 思う implies the action that the doer works his/her mind subjectively and emotionally to image/determine/worry/hope/expect/like or love. Example: 日本の将来を思う。"I think of the future of Japan." 問題ないと思う。"There should be no problem." 風邪を引いたんじゃないかと思う。"I might/must be a cold." ...


4

思い付く is used to when you deliberately try to come up with something, and succeeded. You can think of it as going through some kind of algorithmic steps to reach the idea. 思い浮かぶ can be still used in the same situation , but it emphasizes the cases where ideas naturally came into your mind. It's more like getting a virtual light bulb above your head. But ...


4

~なさい gets appended to the stem of the verb. Here, you have the compound verb 使ってみる "to try to use", whose stem is 使ってみ. Appending ~なさい gives 使ってみなさい Try to use [it]! Give it a try! For the second part, you are probably more confused by the の than by the ない. 使っても意味のない場所 is [使っても意味がない] 場所 after "ga-no conversion". That is, 使っても意味がない ...


4

There is a way that ~もの can be applied to all verbs to "make them a noun", but it's not the way you're thinking of. If you have a verb (e.g. 走る【はしる】 "to run") and a noun (e.g. 人【ひと】 "person"), you can always take the dictionary form (辞書形【じしょけい】) of the verb and put it before the noun, to get a construction that means something like "[noun] that [verb]s" ...



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