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2

持ち込む is to bring things inside, take something into. 持ってくる is just to bring things. None of them are used for people. That would be 連れてくる.


4

The difference is rather huge. 「[送]{おく}る」 means to physically "send by mail or a delivery service." What you can send must be a tangible item. It can also be a person that you 送る to some place by a mode of transportation. 「[贈]{おく}る」 means "to present a person with something". That something can be either tangible or intangible. You can 贈る a favorite ...


7

I am afraid that your understanding of the third form is incorrect. 「捕らえられていた」 is the equivalent of the English "pluperfect passive voice". There is no "progressive" expressed in this. In English, it would be "had been caught (and had stayed in captivity since)".


6

This question is trickier than it may appear to many J-learners and here is why. OP's first sentence means what s/he stated in English NOT only because 「て」 was used but also because the two activities happen to be those that could not take place simultaneously -- "brush teeth" and "eat". 「て」 can certainly signify the sequence of activities, but it can also ...


1

It's simply that てから puts a strong emphasis on the order of the actions. て is just an enumeration and doesn't necessarily imply ordering. 味噌汁を飲んでご飯を食べる。 Drink miso soup and eat rice. (both happen, maybe together, maybe one after the other, but we can't say - they're just 2 parts of a same group of actions) 味噌汁を飲んでからご飯を食べる。 First drink miso soup, and ...


1

You could say something like 今の{授業・クラス}は? 今なんの{授業・クラス}? 今出席の{授業・クラス}は?


13

Before considering modern Japanese, I think that it is easier to understand this by first understanding classical. Classical Japanese has three major regular verb classes: quadrigrade (四段), monograde (一段), and bigrade (二段). Both monograde and bigrade may further be sub-divided into upper (上) and lower (下). There are also four irregular classes: k-irregular, ...


2

Ichidan verbs keep a single root when conjugated, hence their name. For example 見る is 一段 so it keeps its み- stem. みる みます みない みれば みよう みて みた are used for the infinitive, conjunctive, negative, imperative, volitional, connective and past forms, respectively. On the other hand 五段 verbs change according to the verb form. For example 読む would be よむ よみます よまない よめば ...


6

The て-form of a verb followed by いた (past tense of いる: to be) indicates the past progressive tense (e.g., 食べていた "I was eating", 飲んでいた "I was drinking"). In spoken Japanese though, the い of いた is usually silent, so it sounds like tabe[teta] and non[deta].


1

First 毎夜 isn't so common. 毎晩23時ごろ or some such would be must more common. Second, つながっている is not continuous, but rather perfect aspect (completed action where the effect or state continues into the present). If you want to strongly establish a future context, why not use something like これから or 来週 or some such? つもり talks about your intent or plans for some ...



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