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8

Yes it's a sentence-ending particle which is usually used in monologues. One article says the main function of this っと is to casually convince/confirm something to the speaker themselves. Perhaps it's like saying 'okay' to yourself. これで良しっと。 今日も1日お疲れさまでしたっと。 (before going to bed, to oneself) Occasionally it's used when there's an actual ...


7

That depends on context. (After/Once) I wake up, I feed my cat. 起きたら、猫にえさをやる。 (The order/sequence is) after I wake up, I feed my cat. or (Only) after I wake up, I feed my cat. 起きてから、猫にえさをやる。 (After) I wake up, (then) I feed my cat. 起きた後(で)、猫にえさをやる。 PS △ 起きると、猫にえさをやる。 is unnatural, especially for talking about your own actions. ...


6

All of desu, deshita, and datta appear normally before ka. But da is an exception. In main clauses (like your examples), da is deleted before ka: desu + ka →   desu ka deshita + ka → deshita ka da + ka →   ka datta + ka →  datta ka In subordinate clauses (like [dare da ka] shiranai), da sometimes appears before ka. ...


4

I'm going to try to do two things in this answer. First, I'm going to try to address the tangle of terms and theories that have got you confused. (So this answer will unfortunately be rather long!) Second, I'll try to address the specific question of 誘う. Feel free to skip any section that doesn't look immediately helpful :-) What do '-u verb' and ...


3

I feel that the forms in David's answer are a bit uncommon. I'd just use a plain 〜たら: 朝起きたら、猫にエサをやる。 When I wake up in the morning, I feed my cat.


3

I try to be simple, but there's always something need explanation. Should I add "ka" at the end of a sentence? Or just replace "desu" and "deshita" with "da" and "datta"? Grammatically you can have them (see @snailboat's answer), but I'm not sure if you should. The reason is that, plain form + ka often sounds too harsh, unless you're a manly man ...


3

<1> Yes, いず does not sound natural in this context. <2> 立ってはおらず has the same meaning as 立っているのではなくて <3> It does sound more formal, but the nuance does not really change. I would loosely translate it like this: It's not that you are alone; a sense of self-awareness first comes from being surrounded by others.


2

Your sentence 私{わたし}は水曜日{すいようび}にアルバイトがあります。 is absolutely correct sentence to say I have a part-time job on Wednesday. (or "I have to do a part-time job on Wednesday"). You can choose whether adding わたしは to the sentence or not. Both sentences make sense and natural sentences for me. 「水曜日{すいようび}にアルバイトがあります。」 is, if anything, preferable because ...


2

It's 年{とし}が行{い}く. The set phrase means "grow old". And it's not three-year-old "old" but really advanced in years. There's a similar expression 年{とし}を取{と}る, whereas 年が行く suggests more like the speaker is talking from younger eyes, in my personal sense.


2

さそえる would be a ru-verb, but さそう doesn't even end in る, and its stem is saso(w)-, which when joined to -areru gives sasowareru さそわれる. Recall, if the word ends in anything but -iru or -eru it's a "consonant stem" verb and you get the stem by deleting the final vowel. This includes verbs ending in -(w)u, where you only see the consonant if the stem is ...



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