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1

いわんや is archaic and is rarely used in the everyday language. However, まして or ましてや is still used. Examples would be: 魚も食べられないのだから、まして肉など論外だ 魚も食べられないのだから、ましてや肉など論外だ They both have the same meaning, but ましてや gives a bit more emphasis and is also a bit more archaic. To your examples: 誰にも倒されない・・・況してお前だ! does sound ungrammatical, you'd have to say ...


1

In the sentence you gave, you tried to directly translate the phrase into Japanese. However, the sentence you made does not sound natural. Instead, the way to express "Japanese culture, history, and other stuff" is using や, which is used to express "among other things".


0

You did a good job translating these sentences! を marks the object for the verb 使える. What can be used by the wash mashine? Hot water. に is here a bit more tricky and indicates a reason, why he gets excited. Two humorous examples (from the anime AcchiKocchi) with this "reason"-usage: [寒]{さむ}さに[震]{ふる}えるつみきさんを籠に乗せて早く暖かい地へ (つみきさん is shivering, because of ...


2

人情【にんじょう】 is a common (and maybe a bit nostalgic) word which refers to (good) human emotion. You can basically think 人情 includes 友情 (friendship), 愛情 (love), and compassion toward others in general. 人性【じんせい】 is very rare at least as a Japanese word, and I don't know how to use this term. Google gives Chinese articles about 人性 in the first page, although I ...


0

人情 is affection or kindness while 人性 is human nature that's relatively used in negative connotation.


2

Your sentence 私{わたし}は水曜日{すいようび}にアルバイトがあります。 is absolutely correct sentence to say I have a part-time job on Wednesday. (or "I have to do a part-time job on Wednesday"). You can choose whether adding わたしは to the sentence or not. Both sentences make sense and natural sentences for me. 「水曜日{すいようび}にアルバイトがあります。」 is, if anything, preferable because ...


-2

I'm not sure if this is very polite, but at least in a casual setting you can use のに: 天気がよかったのに、散歩に行きませんでした。 Although the weather was fine, I didn't go for a walk. I think a more formal way of expressing a similar construction is using ながら: 寒いながら、ジャケット着ずに待ちました。 Although it was cold, I waited without putting my jacket on. Disclaimer: I ...


1

Your interpretation of 向く and 向ける seems fairly good. While the meaning of these three verbs tend to overlap they are not exactely the same, thus 向く and 向かう are not two verbs for a single concept. Now, let's delve into some details. As you noticed, 向く and 向かう are intransitive and 向ける is transivitive. It is often considered that 向く and 向ける form an ...


2

In fact, 必要 is not a verb, but a noun. It can be an adjective if it is followed by な. As a noun, 必要 means "a necessity" or "a need". As an adjective, it means "necessary" or "needed". そんなに高いパソコン買う必要ありますか? Is there a necessity to buy such an expensive computer? たくさんの文献を読む必要がある。 There is a necessity to read a lot of literature. ログインが必要です。 The ...


3

Both ひとまえ and にんまえ exist. 人前【ひとまえ】:(noun) public place; front of the audience. 人前【にんまえ】: (counter) portion of, often for meal. 1 serving = 1人前【にんまえ】. 人前【じんぜん】(式【しき】) : (noun) A certain irreligious style of wedding, as opposed to Christian-, Shinto-, or Buddhism-style weddings.


5

It is not exactly incorrect to do that, but you should try to avoid assuming other people's emotions because you can never know them for sure. The way to get around it is to add uncertainty to the statement. Most commonly, at least in casual conversation, you use でしょう at the end. 彼はピザを食べたいでしょう - (it seems) he wants to eat pizza. You can also use the ...


7

Those two words do not assume the same roles. 少{すこ}し is an adverb and 少{すく}ない is an i-adjective. So basically, 少し will modify a verb whereas 少ない will tell that there is not much of something. Some examples. 友達{ともだち}が少ない。I don't have a lot of friends. 時間{じかん}が少なくなった。There is not much time left. (lit. Time has become rarer.) ...


2

Here's the basic difference. [noun] + をする: common; means "do ~". [noun] + がする: relatively uncommon; means "there's a sense of ~", "feel ~". 勉強をする and 勉強がする 復活をする and 復活がする 勉強 here is a noun meaning 'study', and 復活 here is a noun meaning 'revival/resurrection'. So 勉強をする and 復活をする make sense, but 勉強がする/復活がする does not make sense. Examples: ...


0

勉強がする and 復活がする don't make sense. 感情がする and 感情をする themselves make little sense but for example, なつかしい感情がした can be understood as 懐かしい感情を覚えた and 複雑な感情をしたロボット as "a robot who is equipped with complex emotion".


4

That なにも is a Guiding Adverb that leads partial negation. It means nothing by itself but functions as a sign that tells that partial negation is following. It's different from normal なに+も ((not) anything) in the point of pitch accent. [なにも{HLL} vs なに{LH}+も{H}] e.g. 何も、急がなくてもいいじゃないか You don't need to hurry, do you? Other examples of Guiding Adverbs are ...


5

日本語でのご質問ですので、日本語で回答させていただきます。 ご質問にあるような状況において「一緒なように」という表現を用いることは、不自然だと思います。意味は伝わりますが……。 仕事で、相手に何か行動を促したり、目的となる状態や行動を伝えたり等する場合に使う「〜ように」という表現は、一般的には、動詞の後に用います。「動詞+ように」という言い方をすると、伝える内容が明確になりますし、また、くだけていない話し方に聞こえるからです。 「一緒な」は「な形容詞」です。な形容詞の後に直接「〜ように」をつけると、動詞が省略されているように感じる場合が多いです。くだけた表現になっている印象です。 例えば、 A「この機能をより便利に使えるように改良して、新商品として発売しましょう。」 ...


3

(I still don't really get the situation where you leave a different city and nevertheless board on the same plane, however ...) One example I now come up with is X先生と一緒の国際便になるように*したいのですが、先生の街からの便がたくさんあって (or あるので)、どれにすればいいか わかりません. (* I edited according to what's noticed in the comment) X先生と国際便 を が 一緒なようにしたいのですが works too. To translate "X-sensei should ...


3

It essentially means How convenient!. It's a short form for いいところに来たね. The literal meaning is Ah, you came to an opportune occasion.


2

In it's purest form ます、ました、and ません are just conjugations. So a good example demonstrating the differences is to use 食べる (because it's breakfast time and I'm hungry). 食べます - I can/will eat 食べました - I ate 食べません - I don't eat For ございます, it's a bit more tricky. ございます is used as a polite form of ある, the verb for "to exist". So an example would be if ...


0

Let me break your 鬱蒼とした into the parts of the speech. 鬱蒼とした is separated into 鬱蒼 ( to Japanese language learners this is frequently called as na-adjective, but I would like to call it as quasi-adjective ( adjective noun ), and here, it is used as the stem of the quasi-adjective = A noun that functions as an adjective. ( Kindly be reminded there are many ...


1

Both に限って and だけ seem to be used with the meaning of "only". Yes, they do. But I'd avoid to use に限って in this way (especially when I speak) because it's prone to be misunderstood as its second idiomatic senses (loaded a lot), that are: With negative sentence: "the last something (to V)", often advocative. 彼に限ってそんなことするわけない! He is the last man to do ...


4

じゃ is the contraction of では. It's a contraction, because じゃ is one mora (one unit length) and では is two moras long. じゃ is frequently used as contraction of では, especially in じゃない < ではない. As pointed out before by one of our native speakers on this site (@l'électeur), じゃありません is at risk of being overused by learners. Presumably, because the uncontracted では ...


4

I think it basically comes down to context. Literate native speakers can usually read most or all of the words on a page, and because they recognize most of the words, when they come to something unknown, they can generally figure out from context what the function of that unknown thing is in a sentence. For example, if it seems to be the subject of a verb ...


1

Is the notion that Kanjis one after another typically indicate that it is a name? I think you can say that. How does one read it if the furigana was not given when there are multiple pronunciation of the said kanjis? We can't. But typical name Kanjis has typical pronunciation, so we can guess. The book give furigana because the name is not ...


3

As Japanese native: 積む feels like many things are loaded, and also feels that they are put on top of another (and I suppose that's what pile-up means). 載せる feels like putting something on top of certain base.


2

だ だ is called a copula, roughly translating to the English verb "to be" (is, are, am, etc.). It is not a particle but a suffix that attaches to the end of nouns and adjectival nouns (na-adjectives). It is used in informal conversation, as opposed to its polite counterpart です, which it seems you already know. Like です, its basic use is to equate two things as ...


2

You can also use [自愛]{じ・あい}. ご自愛ください → Please take care of yourself ご自愛を祈ります → (Same) "I'll pray that you..." Using 祈る with a superiour in your company might be a little too familiar, so ください is probably the better choice here. Refer also to this question and this one.



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