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1

Like in English, you can find a dozen words to mean the same thing. Maybe half of those could be considered in common use. And half again are the few words that you hear the most often to express that meaning. The best way to learn which word should be used in which situation is to listen to native speakers and see what word they use, when they use it, and ...


3

確かに and 誠に have very similar meanings. The difference between them is that 確かに is often used in everyday conversation, but 誠に. 誠に usually used in very formal situation or some historical period drama, because it sounds very formal and somewhat old. So I recommend you to use 確かに. Here are some examples: 確かにそう思う。 (I surely think so; good usage) 誠にそう思う。 (I ...


3

The second そういうこと vaguely refers to the previous discussion as a whole, like "that" in "So, that's it for today". (Of course the first そういうこと refers to "お前さんだって凄い奴だ".) そういうことで/そういうことだから/そんな訳【わけ】だから is a set phrase used when the speaker wants to wrap up the topic and finish the discussion, sometimes even without the conclusion. It's more true when this is ...


-1

僕ももっと頑張る気になるよ そういうことだから means : since you will try harder. Cheers.


2

今日の所は良いでしょう。 is roughly equivalent to "That's it for today." The sentence is used by a teacher or a boss and that means the speaker has finished speaking, lesson or anything else he/she want, and the listener(s) can leave now.


0

A couple of things the other answers didn't address: The ~る form is also referred to as the "dictionary form" ([辞書形]{じ・しょ・けい}). This is how you look up verbs in the dictionary. So if you need to look up "to eat" in a Japanese dictionary, you search for [食]{た}べる, not [食]{た}べます. Likewise, if you see the verb [会]{あ}う in the dictionary, you know this is the ...


0

〜る is used in informal situations (e.g. in daily conversation with your friends) 〜ます is used in formal situations (e.g. in public, or when you speak to a stranger, to people older than you, and to your senior)


1

Yep, they do mean the same thing! Though, they do differ. A super quick summary is that 〜る is used in informal situations while 〜ます is used in formal situations. Also, the so called 'る' ending is used in specific grammar situations that you will learn as you go on. The 〜る form of a verb is called the 'plain' form. Though, be careful because the 〜る ending is ...


6

It's for polite use by both genders, and the most generally used first-person pronoun. While it used to be more for women, this is no longer the case. It is true that women tend to use わたし (watashi) more than other pronouns, but it is not a feminine pronoun†, and it is frequently used by men. It is more polite than others and also used more generally. ...


1

このビールを飲んでみました。 I think it means 'I tried drinking this beer' (You drank it). 'I tried to drink this beer' would be 「このビールを飲もうとしました」(You may or may not have drunk it). If I understand correctly, 'try doing' 「~してみる」 'try to do' 「~しようとする」 'will try to do' 「~しようと思う」「~したいと思う」(Literally 'I think I will ~' 'I think I want to ~') I will try to talk to ...


3

Mr. Li is cheerful, healthy, and interesting." It would be リさんはあかるくて、げんきで、おもしろいです。 Yes, you're right. What I don't understand is how to connect negative adjective sentences, like if I wanna say "Mr. Li is cheerful, not healthy, and not interesting." It would be リさんはあかるくて、げんきではなくて、おもしろくありません, word for word, but it would be more natural to say ...


1

My money's on onomatopoeia as well, as it's written outside of a speech bubble, like the sniffing sound くんくん and the gulping sound ごく, and it's in the same hand as those. We also see あー in this same format in the same panel as the little girl says 「あー!」. That being said, while しょわー sounds very effervescent, the illustration makes me think it's meant to ...


2

「腰を仲ばし」 makes no sense I am afraid. Are you sure it was not 「腰を伸ばし」? 「[腰]{こし}を[伸]{の}ばす」 means "to straighten oneself". The sentence you found on google is incorrect as well. It should be 「伸ばします」 at the end.


0

Furigana is used to clarify how a word should be pronounced. It's common in books for children, since children probably aren't familiar enough with kanji to be able to read the text. With the furigana at the side, they can figure out what the word means based on the pronunciation, while at the same time they can learn the kanji and will be able to recognize ...


3

Hiragana and katakana are both phonetic (sound-based) writing systems. Furigana is used to show the phonetic reading of a kanji (or sometimes even Latin lettering). It is not used with katakana because katakana is already phonetic, so its pronunciation is unambiguous. For example, my name (Eric), in katakana, would be エリック. You could express this ...


2

新明解国語辞典 第五版:  せかい【世界】 ① 人間が住んでいたり 行って見たり することが出来る、すべての所。〔狭義では、地球上に存在するすべての国家・住民社会の全体を指す〕 「世界[一]{いち}・世界記録・世界保健機関・第三世界」 ② そのものと その同類で形作っている、なんらかの秩序が有ると考えられる集まり。 「若者の世界〔=仲間〕/魚の世界/学問の世界〔=学問の領域内〕 Sense ② is interesting because it parallels the English word: the animal / plant / insect world; the world of fashion; stars from the ...


1

「[瞬]{まばた}く」 is a fairly "big" word and it would sound too heavy or literary to use in a children's song. The more common and intuitive word choice for native speakers would be 「瞬き(を)する」 not only for children but also for adults as well. 「まばたきしては みんなをみてる」 is in the structure: 「A(を)してはB(を)する」= "to do A and B alternately" = "(The stars) keep ...



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