Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

Usually, a common word like kaisha will only ever be written as かいしゃ instead of 会社 in these two cases: When accomodating for young children or non-Japanese speakers who might not be able to read kanji (yet). For stylistic/typographic purposes. For example, as part of an all-hiragana name of a company on a billboard. Just another way to stand out in an ...


2

会社{かいしゃ}の名前{なまえ} is grammatically fine, and while compound nouns are sometimes formed by simply eliminating the の particle (e.g.,本{ほん}の棚{たな} -> 本棚{ほんだな} or 勉強{べんきょう}の不足{ふそく} -> 勉強不足{べんきょうぶそく}), in this case the word you are looking for is: 会社名{かいしゃめい} (the on-yomi of 名 is generally used in compound nouns and has the same meaning as 名前{なまえ} as a whole: name). ...


5

会社の名前{なまえ} consists of two nouns, one describing the other. The one with の is in genitive case which is used to indicate possession in this case. It's roughly equivalent to 's or of in English: company's name or the name of the company (both are translated to 会社の名前). Note that 名前 is a native Japanese word and it uses kun-yomi reading of the kanji in this ...


2

One of the uses of the の particle (that you will learn early on in Japanese) is to show possession. "Company Name" is the same as "Company's Name". Company's Name = 会社の名前


2

According to my dictionary, かいしゃ (hiragana) can mean either a company/corporation/workplace or a household word/universal praise. I'd stick with writing the word 会社 in kanji to be more specific and avoid any confusion. It's also good practice to get as much exposure to kanji as you can early on. It'll help you out big time when reading more advanced ...


3

Your observation is correct. I'm not sure about the etymology, but as a matter of fact, we can use 「お疲れさん」 to someone whose status is equal to or lower than ourselves. Addressing it to your boss is clearly rude. Personally, I usually stick to 「お疲れさまです」 in a business setting, because I think saying お疲れさん is over-friendly and shows little or no respect. Even ...


2

Neither of those are common-use pronouns, but for different reasons - one isn't common-use, the other isn't a pronoun. I'll explain. 我が輩 is a relatively unusual first-person pronoun. It is used in exactly two contexts: When a male speaker wants to sound stuck-up and self-important - almost always in fiction, and often with noticeably more literary speech ...


3

Basically, from low to high (and high to low) お疲れさまです from high to low ご苦労様です お疲れさん ご苦労さん In many cases, the act of 省略 generally decreases the level of honour.


3

The nature of sound shortening is often, due to the environment that spawns such changes, rather 'casual' and colloquial. Much like how 様 and さん have relatively different levels of 'politeness' so do お疲れさま and お疲れさん. (Speaking merely from personal experience, I have only used お疲れさん among friends and casual acquaintances in informal situations. Among equal ...


4

Answer As other answerers say, you can replace やな by だな. [雨]{あめ}[降]{ふ}ったみたいやな。 = 雨降ったみたいだな。 (It looks like it rained.) これは[君]{きみ}のやな? = これは君のだな? (It is yours, isn't it?) A variety of usages / forms In the same way, you can replace やね by だね. やね (だね) is a more familiar variation. [雨]{あめ}[降]{ふ}ったみたいやね。 = 雨降ったみたいだね。 (It looks like it rained.) Exception ...


11

「やな」 is a Kansai affirmative sentence-ender just like 「だな」 for Kanto. 「[久]{ひさ}しぶりやな。」 = "Long time no see, yeah?" or just "Long time no see!" 「いい[感]{かん}じやなぁ。」 = "That's cool.", "That's pretty good.", etc. Real Kansai people would use ええ, not いい for the second phrase, though.


6

It means ”だね”, and if I am not mistaken can be heard in the 関西 area. For example, せやな is the same as そうだね. So, いい感じやなぁ would be the same as いい感じだね.


8

しょわー I think it's an onomatopoeia of the fizzing sound from soda.


0

死亡する is also used in place of 死ぬ because the latter is too strong a word. It's used in news articles, announcements, and I think has a slightly official and impersonal feel to it.


2

Similar to the relationship between だけ and しか, you could also use [危]{あや}うく or [辛]{かろ}うじて with the negation/opposite of what you are trying to say. Since these words mean "barely", the negation/opposite of the premise would translate together as "almost". 例文: 危うく終電に間にあった。 → I barely caught the last train home. → implies "I almost missed the last ...


6

There is no one particular Japanese word that you can use everytime you want to use "almost" in English contexts. "I almost fell down." = 「もう[少]{すこ}しで[転]{ころ}ぶところだった。」 That would be by far the most natural Japanese sentence. Native speakers would almost never say 「ほとんど転んだ。」 unless they were trying to sound humorous. You, as a learner, could end up ...


1

From my personal experience, 「亡くなる」 is the most neutral word. 「先生のお父さんはがんで亡くなられたよ」 - "Our teacher's father died from cancer" 「死ぬ」 is a strong word that is usually avoided by polite people, but is used to express emphasis or to deliberately offend. It can also be used to talk about animals. 「勝手に死ね!」 - Literally, "Die on your own!", but is very strong and ...


0

"aite" is a form of "aku" which is an intransitive verb that means "open". "akete" is a form of "akeru" which is a transitive verb "open". It's a little confusing for English speakers because "open" can be used transitively OR intransitively. "The door opened" vs. "I opened the door" You can also use "open" as an adjective in English! "The library is ...


2

It depends on how it is used. If the customer had made all the orders, and the waiter is making a confirmation going through the orders, and if the non-past tense is used, then it will sound like the waiter simply forgot the order and is asking for the second time with a guess. That can be rude. By using the past tense, it expresses that the customer's ...


8

In short, your waiter said what he said because it is the "in" thing to do for young workers (mostly part-time) at inexpensive restaurants, fast food places, convenience stores, etc. This speech style is called 「マニュアル[敬語]{けいご}」, 「コンビニ[言葉]{ことば}」、「ファミレス言葉」, etc. and it has been very common the last 20 years or so. (マニュアル = "manual", ファミレス = "family ...


-1

No one said two really common expressions: どうってことない and いいってこと, followed usually by よ ... Also any similar expression ( どうってことはない, どうと言うこともない, どうって言うことはない and so on...). To prove the use of ii tte koto, which I guess may be regional, here is a link However, I'm not questioning how often you hear it in real life, I'm saying you hear it pretty often. And ...


0

死ぬ is the general, neutral term for "to die". 他界する assumes particular belief, namely that the person/animal goes to the afterworld. 亡くなる is euphemism.


7

First, I will talk about how to use 「[励]{はげ}む」 and later on, other possible expressions. Both 「[勉強]{べんきょう}に励む」 and 「[勉学]{べんがく}に励む」 sound natural with the latter being more formal or "adult-speaker-like". Next, how to combine 励む with other verbs. You used 「励ます」, which is a transitive verb meaning "to encourage someone to do something". You cannot use ...


11

Here is how I and many other native speakers use the two words in real life. I am answering without looking at anything. 「静かさ」 describes the bare physical degree of how "not loud" a thing is. Quietness, while it may be desired, is not a prerequisite here. Examples: 「静かさ」 is used to talk about how quiet a car, airconditioner, street, person, etc. is. ...


3

I have found something that might be useful from poking around in the etymological information I have to hand. Shogakukan notes in their entry for 静{しず}か that the noun form is 静かさ. There is no separate entry for 静かさ。 When looking to see if there was an entry for 静けさ, I found an entry instead for 静けし, which lists a noun form of 静けさ. 静{しず}けし appears to be ...


5

Answer I'm a native speaker and I'm sure that there's no difference between them. It's a evidence for it that Japanese government uses 外人 on its public document. Reference It's said that 外人(さん) should not be used because few people feel discriminated when Japanese call them 外人. Thus, especially on public document (e.g. TV programs), 外国人 are used ...


2

First of all, there's only one modern polite word to call a foreigner and it is 外国人. There are other phrases too, such as 海外の人 or 海外の方. The latter one is used more often. However, you mostly hear 外国人 when a politician talks from a tribune or an overly politically correct Japanese person tries to be polite. In fact the normal way to refer to a foreigner is ...


3

How about using the English copula in this case too? "And there was Hanako, lost for words to comfort her sister, Kayo" Or in the case of the second, "the" could work too: "The ever evolving convenience store: with 40 years since its inception, blah blah blah" As for meaning, it doesn't mean anything special per se, but to me it feels "defining" for lack ...



Top 50 recent answers are included