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2

げ is a suffix to adjective to mean "like" as in "優しげ”、”悲しげ”、"喜ばしげ," "勇ましげ”、”得意気.” It's originally used to connote "a tint" of something. Adjective + げ can be used as an adjective like, "優しげな表情 - affectionate expression”, ”悲しげな声 - sorrowful tone”, "喜ばしげな態度 - joyful manner," "勇ましげな顔 - valiant look”, ”得意気な顔 - triumphant face,” as well as a verb, "優しげに撫でる - ...


8

~ならではの + noun is a set phrase meaning "(noun) only seen in ~", "(noun) unique to ~", "(noun) that can be done only by ~", etc. For example, you can say 渡辺先生ならではの手術, which means "surgery that can only be performed by Dr. Watanabe." (BTW, ならでは is read ならでわ) Now, this sentence is a cleft sentence where the person name is focused. When you say "この難しい手術ができるのは", ...


0

Each of those phrases looks like a part of sentence made with correlative adverbs of 呼応の副詞. Their meanings and ending phrases are decided from adverbs preceding, and in the case of a very short sentence with an adverb omitted like those, I guess that those meanings just depend on the native speaker's sense after all. as an example: これから...するところ from now ...


4

し損なう is a compound verb, consisting of the continuative form (連用形) of the verb する + the verb 損なう, meaning "fail to do (correctly)" "to miss (the chance to do~~)", e.g. 計算をし損なう "make an error in calculation" 留学をし損なう "missed the chance to go study abroad" (You can also say 計算しそこなう / 留学しそこなう, leaving out を. In this case, you could see them as compound ...


0

Well, I'm not an expert on Japanese, but as a Chinese who is learning Japanese, I'd like to offer something from this perspective. The dictionary says かわいい can be written as 可愛い while かわいそう can be written as 可哀相. For a Chinese this seems quite straight-forward. You see, in Chinese, 愛 means "love" and 哀 means "pity", and these two characters have the same ...


4

In cases like this they are sometimes interchangeable, but are also often idiomatically used with certain verbs (a collocation). Think of に as A→B and と as A↔B: 円をドルに両替した。Change yen into dollars. (I give you yen, I get dollars) 円をドルと交換した。 Exchange yen for dollars (I give you yen, you give me dollars).


0

仕損なう and 損なう are actually different verbs. Same with 支払う and 払う. What you are seeing is probably people just writing hiragana instead of the kanji that is supposed to represent し. 〜する is just the standard "to do ~ .. ". In your example, 損なう appears as a noun 損ない, so you can add する just like you can add it to any noun, although many times you will encounter ...


3

The usage of 〜上で is a little tricky to learn but after reading hundreds of sentences using it I finally started to get a grasp of it. To put it simply, I feel that in the above passages it has the nuance of "when doing ~". This site describes 上で with two definitions, the latter which is: 特定の範囲内において、といった意味の表現。 An expression that means "with respect ...


7

チケット: Tickets for theaters, amusement parks, sport games, etc. 切符: Tickets in general used for trains, buses, etc. 乗車券: An official term used by railway companies for a type of 切符. 乗車券 refers to a basic fare ticket whose price is calculated based on the travel distance. You may additionally need other types of 切符 such as 特急券 ("limited express train ...


3

In expressing: "A means/implies B (after all, in essence, etc.)", it is only very common, grammatical and natural to use 「ということ」 back-to-back among us native speakers. (If it is taught otherwise in Japanese as a foreign language, that is too bad.) 「(Mini-Sentence A) ということは (Mini-Sentence B) ということだ / である。」 Applying this to your example sentence, ...


-1

Good question. The combination that sounds the most natural to me is 彼が金を貸してくれたことは私は彼に信用されているということだ ~ということ when it comes in the end of a sentence I simply translate it in my head as "means that". In the middle of the sentence I translate it as "the thing called", which I don't think is applied here. I am not 100% sure, I will search a bit more on it ...


5

This type of ね is a filler particle meaning nothing. Such fillers can appear in many places within a sentence. ね is one of the typical "girly" filler particles. You don't have to translate them, although English fillers such as "you know" or "er" may be used if you fell they're appropriate. See the following answers, which are closely related. ...


1

゛ changes like this: h → b, k → g, s → z、t → d. ゜ changes only h → p.


7

I'm not 100% sure what you're asking here, but ゛ when used by itself actually has a number of different usages. Generally, ゛ (Dakuten) are not written separately. For example, "か" "ka" becomes "が" "ga". If you didn't know this, you should probably consult a reference on hiragana (and maybe also katakana) as snailboat says. However, there are a number ...


0

「こう」is the adverbial form of the こ-series(これ、この、ここ、ect.). A close literal match in English is 'thusly' (in this way).


2

Yes, your understanding about こう (I've never seen it written as 斯う though) meaning "like this" is correct, however in some cases it can be more thought of as "as follows" or "as below". Here is a simple example: そして、僕はこう言った。 [And then, I spoke.] 「日本語なんて難しすぎるよ」 [Japanese is just too difficult!] As in this example, often it's tricky to translate ...


15

I think the この通り means (or, comes from) something like 「この通り、謝ります(だから許してください)。」 "I'm apologizing like this / as you see (so please forgive me)" or 「この通り、お願いします(だから頼みを聞いてください)。」 "I am begging you like this / as you see (so please do me a favor)." This phrase is used when you apologize someone or ask a favor of someone, and you'd usually say it while ...



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