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4

厚生, 福祉 and 福利 First of all, 福利 and 厚生 are almost outdated words except in legal terms or a combination of 福利厚生 ("fringe benefits" according to WP). 福祉 is the most common word covers "welfare" in every situation today. 福利 particularly refers to benefits or services one can gain from welfare system. And 厚生 literally means "fulfilled life" or "life ...


8

Although 季【き】 and 節【せつ】 both can mean 'season' within various compounds, they are not used on their own to mean 'season' at least in modern Japanese. You always have to say 季節. Many Japanese compounds are made of two kanji with similar meanings: 危険 (danger + danger), 豊富 (plenty + plenty), 永久 (eternity + eternity), and so on. In most cases, you cannot just ...


1

「遍」 is used to count action,movement or behavior. and It is more archaic and informal than 「回」 ○「その動画10遍見たけど、理解出来なかった」 (I watched the video for 10times but I couldn't understand any of it.) This word can't be used for Ordinal number. ×「この映画を見るのはこれが3遍目です。」 ○「この動画を見るのはこれが3回目です。」 (This is third time for me to watch this video.)


1

After posting this question I found this link. Lessons 24 to 28 systematically introduce the conditionals and the reasons for choosing each one. Here's my attempt at a summary 〜と Use when the main clause is an inevitable or uncontrollable result of the condition 電気をつけると、明るくなります. ニューヨークに行くとおもしろい店がたくさんある。 ~ば/なら ば is used for verbs and ...


9

今後 means "from now on", whereas 未来 refers to a time far in the future. Note that 未来 refers to some point in the future, whereas 今後 is something starting from the present, and continuing (indefinitely) into the future. For the near future (even one's own future), you're better off using 将来. 未来 usually has a sense of being farther forward in time than that.


5

Edited in bold font An action in non-past tense in a なら clause is to succeed that of the main clause, and if you use it wrongly, people will misunderstand which happens before and which after. Past tense in なら clauses stands for if it's true or not. As long as you use なら correctly, たら is enough versatile to replace ~と and ~ば. You can't use たら for actions ...


4

People would figure out what you mean and forgive you because you're only a learner of Japanese, but you may get a few strange looks for some sentences. The commenter's research study in your cited question, attributed to a study done in 1989 by Shinji Sanada also shows もっと早く{起きると/起きれば/起きたら}よかった。 I should have woken up earlier. Tokyo: 4% と; 94% ば; 2% たら ...


3

復帰 (intransitive) It originally means "back to original location/position", then figuratively refers to "back to work". This word doesn't imply at all the subject was once out of order: you put your PC in sleep mode, then press the power button, the machine will 復帰する. 復元 (transitive or intransitive) This word put stress on "to reproduce the original ...


8

Yes. ~様 is an honorific and can be easily thought of as a more respectful version of ~さん. It is gender neutral, so it can be used by both men and women when addressing either gender. It is often used when addressing someone of a higher social position, or someone for whom you have high regards. On a day-to-day basis, it's commonly used to address ...


1

Even though Eric says it is not rude to use ください is japanese, based on your question, you are looking for a softer way to ask/request things. ・ください is like a formal and cold please but can be a bit straight sometimes. You can use it when you are the customer or the supervisor. Otherwise, to avoid this straightness, the sentence is often turned the other way ...


3

"先生が多い必要とすると思います" is not valid: "先生が - 必要とする" means "The teacher(s) need[s] (something)". When we need teachers, use either "先生を必要とする" or "先生が必要だ". If placed like this, the 多い has to work like an adverb : "先生を多く必要とする" If one insist on "多い" form, it has to modify the noun "先生": "*多い先生を必要とする" -- and there's one more trap: in such usage, "多くの先生を必要とする" is the ...


1

Yes, わるいところ could indeed mean "negative aspect." ところ literally means "place", and this can be broadly interpreted as an actual place, a point in time, a characteristic, etc. Some other examples of ところ used in the broader sense: ドレスのシンプルなところが好きだ。 I like the simplicity of the dress. (Characteristic) 彼は高慢なところがない。 He has no pride. ...


5

It would be 「[私]{わたし}の[大学]{だいがく}での[経験]{けいけん}」 or 「大学での私の経験」. You would need to use 「での」 instead of 「の」. 「大学での経験」, without using a pronoun, is just fine as well.


3

Even without any context to go with, only [b. 行くことにしようよ] is correct as a phrase. We would never say [a. 行こうとしようよ] or [c. 行くようになろうよ] in any situation. The problem with [a. 行こうとしようよ] is that it is double-volitional (行こう & しよう) and it is ungrammatical. It is grammatical to say 「行くとしよう」 or 「行こうとする」 in single-volitional, but not 「行こうとしよう」 in double. ...


3

Although it may depend on the context, I would basically say 'no'. The two phrases mean different things and because of that, one would expect different types of phrases to follow each. The two would largely be uninterchangeable. 「[漢字]{かんじ}の[読]{よ}み[方]{かた}はおろか」 would mean "not to mention how to read (the) kanji", "not to mention how (the) kanji are read", ...


4

Basically, 疎{おろ}か is an adjective (形容動詞) so it has to "decorate" a noun. In Japanese a nominalized sentence just behave like a noun so both of your sentences are grammatical and make sense. But their meaning is slighly different. 漢字{かんじ}の読{よ}み方{かた}はおろか,... Not to mention the way kanji are read, ... Whereas, 漢字{かんじ}を読{よ}むのはおろか,... Not to ...


2

Both are the same meaning 殺さずに生け捕るってのが面倒でしたがね 殺さずに生け捕るのが面倒でしたがね the って is a abbreviation of という which is emphasizing 殺さずに生け捕る.


1

Like in English, you can find a dozen words to mean the same thing. Maybe half of those could be considered in common use. And half again are the few words that you hear the most often to express that meaning. The best way to learn which word should be used in which situation is to listen to native speakers and see what word they use, when they use it, and ...


3

確かに and 誠に have very similar meanings. The difference between them is that 確かに is often used in everyday conversation, but 誠に. 誠に usually used in very formal situation or some historical period drama, because it sounds very formal and somewhat old. So I recommend you to use 確かに. Here are some examples: 確かにそう思う。 (I surely think so; good usage) 誠にそう思う。 (I ...


3

The second そういうこと vaguely refers to the previous discussion as a whole, like "that" in "So, that's it for today". (Of course the first そういうこと refers to "お前さんだって凄い奴だ".) そういうことで/そういうことだから/そんな訳【わけ】だから is a set phrase used when the speaker wants to wrap up the topic and finish the discussion, sometimes even without the conclusion. It's more true when this is ...


-1

僕ももっと頑張る気になるよ そういうことだから means : since you will try harder. Cheers.


2

今日の所は良いでしょう。 is roughly equivalent to "That's it for today." The sentence is used by a teacher or a boss and that means the speaker has finished speaking, lesson or anything else he/she want, and the listener(s) can leave now.


0

A couple of things the other answers didn't address: The ~る form is also referred to as the "dictionary form" ([辞書形]{じ・しょ・けい}). This is how you look up verbs in the dictionary. So if you need to look up "to eat" in a Japanese dictionary, you search for [食]{た}べる, not [食]{た}べます. Likewise, if you see the verb [会]{あ}う in the dictionary, you know this is the ...


0

〜る is used in informal situations (e.g. in daily conversation with your friends) 〜ます is used in formal situations (e.g. in public, or when you speak to a stranger, to people older than you, and to your senior)


1

Yep, they do mean the same thing! Though, they do differ. A super quick summary is that 〜る is used in informal situations while 〜ます is used in formal situations. Also, the so called 'る' ending is used in specific grammar situations that you will learn as you go on. The 〜る form of a verb is called the 'plain' form. Though, be careful because the 〜る ending is ...


6

It's for polite use by both genders, and the most generally used first-person pronoun. While it used to be more for women, this is no longer the case. It is true that women tend to use わたし (watashi) more than other pronouns, but it is not a feminine pronoun†, and it is frequently used by men. It is more polite than others and also used more generally. ...


1

このビールを飲んでみました。 I think it means 'I tried drinking this beer' (You drank it). 'I tried to drink this beer' would be 「このビールを飲もうとしました」(You may or may not have drunk it). If I understand correctly, 'try doing' 「~してみる」 'try to do' 「~しようとする」 'will try to do' 「~しようと思う」「~したいと思う」(Literally 'I think I will ~' 'I think I want to ~') I will try to talk to ...



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