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5

I think there is almost no difference in their meanings, and the two phrases are almost always interchangeable. I said almost because I can not think of even a single counter example in a few minutes as a native speaker. By the way, you can also use a verb, '計画する', without 'を' in a similar way. For example, 旅行の計画を立てる。 旅行の計画をする。 are similar to ...


4

毎【ごと】に means "every", so 2日ごとに is "every second day". On the other hand, X置【お】きに literally means "leaving (an amount of time/space/...) X (between each occurence)". It comes from the verb 置く, "to put", "to place", "to leave (sth. somewhere)". Here is an article from NHK's 身近なことばの疑問にお答えします about ごとに and おきに. So how come おきに sometimes means the same as ...


4

I think it's "quite" emotionally loaded, or at least can be. My son often refers to it when he wants to see his mom (and it's generally met w/ tears). He's a bit of a mama's boy. On the flip side though, throw a な~ at the end of it, and now it's definitely softened. I think for the most part it has to do with the tone of the way it's conveyed, but to a ...


6

回復 is a general word for recovery, though it's often used for economics, healing from injuries / diseases, and the weather getting better: [景気]{けいき}の回復が[急務]{きゅうむ}とされている。 [怪我]{けが}のほうもすっかり回復しました。 [台風]{たいふう}は[今夜中]{こんやじゅう}に[抜]{ぬ}けて、[明日]{あした}にはお[天気]{てんき}も回復する[見込]{みこ}みです。 修復 is used mostly for artifact restorations (like in the question) and ...


3

While I cannot guarantee this answer, using the help of Rikaichan, it appears there are slight differences between each word. The correct answer makes sense, if I read each of them as I assume they are to be read. 回復 is often used for general purpose healing. Think of a person recovering from a sickness. 回復 is often used for healing in video games, if ...


3

日本語で失礼します。 この場合は「ドアを叩く」を慣用句としてひとつの動詞としてみなすほうが、「叩く」を単独の動詞とするよりも自然な解釈になります。 「ドアを叩く」=「進む・導く」のように置き換えられるので、「知らない次元へ導いて」となり、「の」を省略したとみなさなくても良くなります。 とはいえ、「~へのドアを叩く」と書くほうが一般的な表現です(その場合でも一つの動詞として見なせる)。


4

You are right, this sentence is normally written in this way (Let's forget the furigana レベル for now): 知らない次元へのドアをたたく knock at the door leading to the unknown dimension And because "の" is omitted, I feel this 知らない次元へ actually modifies たたく. If it were not in the lyrics, I would say such wording is at least highly unnatural. (And I might also say that ...


0

They can be summarized like this: ( I=intransitive verb / T=transitive verb / TP=potential form of the transitive verb ) I: きこえる "can be heard" / T: きく "hear" / TP: きける "can hear" I: みえる "can be seen" / T: みる "see" / TP: (みられる or みれる) "can see" So this is the picture. However one point somewhat confusing is the (みられる or みれる) part, where lexically ...


-2

みえます Maybe, I think that your understanding is correct. みまられます The word "みまられます" is not. Did you mean "みられます" ? Can you show me an example sentence? きけます (= can listen) eg: あなたはストーリーをきけます。 You can listen to the story . きこえます (=hear) eg: 海の音がきこえます。 We can hear the ocean from here. 何か音がきこえますか? Do you hear any sound?


3

見える To be visible, to be in sight. あそこに高{たか}い山{やま}が見える。 A tall mountain can be seen over there. 僕{ぼく}にはあなたが見える。 You are visible to me / I can see you. to look like. 僕にはその雲{くも}がわたあめに見える。 That cloud looks like cotton candy to me. 見える is about objects being visible and not so much about one's ability to to see them. Obviously, if an ...


10

Both basically share the same meaning, and are interchangeable in most cases. For example, there is no difference between 期末試験 and 期末テスト. But there are set phrases where only one of them is used. 入学試験 entrance exam ((*)入学テスト is unusual) テスト駆動開発 test-driven development ((*)試験駆動開発 is unusual) And I think 試験 sounds a bit more formal and serious. Critical ...


0

(I don't think the question is phrased well: it's really about dictionary abbreviations. Perhaps you can edit it after this answer.) Remember these are abbreviations, so if you want to read them out helpfully it's: 自五: ji-go, short for jidoushi-godan 他五: ta-go, short for tadoushi-godan The 五段 means "5-base (verb)", which has all sorts of other names, ...


1

"So you are free all day today?" When I was back to the table he said bluntly, presumably hearing I talk to the phone that I caught a cold and was going to take the day off . I think と-みえる/と-みえて is best alternated with ようだ/ようで or らしい/らしく, so in this case: 風邪をひいたので休ませていただきます、と言ったのを聞いていたようで、 風邪をひいたので休ませていただきます、と言ったのを聞いていたらしく、 To the last question: Yes, ...


3

Yes, this 終止形+とみえる (or と見える) is another variant of ように見える ("it seems", "it looks like"). It's a literary expression, so we don't usually use it in conversations. ~と言ったのを聞いていたとみえる is "It seems he (=少年) heard I had said ~", where "~" here is "風邪を引いたので休ませていただきます". He said "きょうは一日ひまなんだ", because he was listening to the phone call (of "I") and knew "I" was going ...


1

I think the key to remember with てもらう is that you benefited from it (more or less). Doesn't matter if you did anything... in fact in many cases you won't have done anything. I think for this situation (considering the fact you actually want to do the survey - IE they're doing you a favor and not the other way around) 頼まれてもらいました or maybe 紹介してもらいました might ...


6

今日は誘ってくれて嬉しかった sounds perfectly natural to me. I think it's like "Thank you for asking me out for today." implying "Today, I had a great time." 今日誘ってくれて嬉しかった sounds to me like "I was happy you asked me out TODAY, not another day."


2

That 今日 indicates the day when she felt happy. If it's the day when she was invited (for), the sentence would be 今日誘ってくれて嬉しかった.


2

I see almost no difference between the two. I googled and found a handful of articles and questions about this topic, written by native Japanese people. But none of the explanations was convincing enough, at least to me. Both tend to refer to the ability of solving practical problems, not just the ability to memorize something and get high marks on written ...


2

溜 is composed with 氵(さんずいへん; water/liquid) + 留 (to stay). [...が] 溜まる implies that something collected/accumulated/built up should have streamed/flowed. 積 is composed with 禾(のぎへん; grain) + 責 (to charge the debt piercingly after lending for a while) and means to pile crops carelessly. [...が] 積もる indicate that something is simply piled/accumulated with no ...


1

積もる{つもる} Mostly used for things that fall from above that you have no control of. Think of something accumulating on top of something. 雪{ゆき}が積もる。 塵{ちり}が積もる。 積もった怒り{いかり}が爆発{ばくはつ}した。 You could say 埃{ほこり} as well, but 塵{ちり} is the most common. 溜まる{たまる}・貯まる{たまる} Think about something filling up a container from the bottom. お風呂{ふろ}に水{みず}が溜まる。 ...


0

No, you can't say neither 3 nor 4. In my experience of daily life, usage of 溜まる is mostly for water, money, and undone tasks (like 洗濯(物), 洗い物, 仕事, 宿題, etc.), whereas 積もる is mostly for 雪 and 埃. Just like Will has explained.


7

洗濯物が溜まる/洗濯物が積もる 洗濯(物)が溜まる is a very common way to say "to have a lot of clothes to wash". It implies you have to wash that laundry soon. If you do want to emphasize the physical aspect of the pile of the laundry, 洗濯物が積もる may be technically OK. You might say 「洗濯物が山のように積もっていて(or 山のように積んであって)、ドアが開けられない!」 when the laundry is physically blocking the door :) ...


1

Anyway, たもれ/たも is kind of very archaic expression, and it's only spoken by Heian Era aristocrats in manga/anime (like Ojarumaru!), novels or TV shows. So, be careful not to use this in your 21st century real life :)


5

助けてたも = 助けてください。 ーてたも means ください and was used throughout the Heian period by important, respected or distinguished people. The character おじゃる丸 uses てたも because he is a 5-year-old Heian-era prince.


8

たも is 音変化 of たもれ, meaning ください. たもれ is the command form of たもる, which is 音変化 of たまわる. 助けてたも! ≒ 助けてたもれ, 助けてください おねがいじゃもう一つ作ってたも。≒ 作ってたもれ, 作ってください エンマに「よいシャク見つかってよかったの」とつたえてたも。≒ つたえてたもれ, 伝えてください


8

We find the following information on their official webpage: 「えん旅」の“えん”には、応援の“援”、出会った人たちとの“縁”、人々が輪でつながる“円”、旅の締めくくりの旅人によるステージでの公”演” などさまざまな意味を込めています。 http://www.nhk.or.jp/ashita/entabi/ They are using kana instead of kanji for the first part to leave its meaning open for the viewer. Also, compare this to how some personal (first) names, especially ...


1

"なび" is a shortening of "ナビゲーション" (navigation). As u may know, japanese alphabet contains only one character which begins with sound "V" and it is わ. For this reason, all "vi", "vu", "ve", "vo" become び、ぶ、べ、ぼ in japanese. For example, Vietnam - ベトナム. But for some reason violin is バイオリン (not ワイオリン).


4

(Note that 寝る doesn't necessarily imply sleeping, but can mean "to lie down".) 寝台 is just what it says: an elevated platform (台) for lying down / sleeping (寝) and usually refers to the "bed"s in couchette/sleeping cars in trains (or buses, ships, etc.).


5

「好きな~」 generally corresponds to "~ which one likes", and one can safely have multiple 好きな色 and 好きな食べ物. 好きな色は赤と黒です。 Some E-J dictionaries say "favorite" is "特に好きな" or "大好きな", which means the English adjective "favorite" is usually stronger than 好きな. And as far as I know, English has no single-word adjective which exactly matches 好きな. I think "favorite" ...



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