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13

リア充 is different from "playboy". リア充: an internet meme constructed from リアル (real) + 充実【じゅうじつ】 (fulfill). a person who is successful or fulfilled in real life (vs. an otaku who is living in the world of anime or video games). In most cases this refers to someone who has a lover, used with some sense of jealousy. Sometimes this is used to refer to any ...


12

From http://dict.hjenglish.com/jp/jc/はかる 計る - to measure (quantities and in general) “計る”指计数物品的数量。转义为计划。如“计划时间”、“量体温”、“计算数量”、“筹划组织的将来”等。 (「計る」は、物の数を数えること。転じて、計画すること。「時間を計る」「体温を計る」「数量を計る」「組織の将来を計る」など。) 計る is used for counting/measuring the number of something. It can also mean "to plan". (General word for measuring things) 時間を計る - Plan a time 体温を計る ...


12

It's a contraction of 答えれば. More generally, eba contracts to ya: kotaereba → kotaerya  (答えれば → 答えりゃ) okeba  → okya    (おけば  → おきゃ) ieba   → iya     (言えば  → 言や) nakereba → nakerya  (なければ → なけりゃ) (As you can see, the pattern is easier to see and describe when romanized.)


11

To us native speakers, 「好奇心」 is a fairly big word and we do not use it as often as English-speakers might use "curiosity" in informal situations (or out on the street, so to speak). Natural ways to say "I'm just curious but ~~" or "Just out of curiosity, ~~" would be: Informal: 「ちょっと[聞]{き}きたいんだけど~~」、「[参考]{さんこう}までに~~」、「参考までに聞くけど~~」, etc. More formal: ...


10

It's a vocative particle, like the English vocative "O" in the following example: O Rain! Please change into snow! It sounds poetic or literary. It's defined as 係助詞「よ」 in 集英社国語辞典: 係助詞。相手への呼びかけ。「泣くな妹よ、妹よ泣くな」「風よ伝えよ、かの人に」「モズよ、寒いと鳴くでねえ」 I bolded the meaning, which is basically vocative.


10

An excerpt from 広辞苑's definition for 鉄拳: 堅く握りかためたこぶし。にぎりこぶし。げんこつ。 In short, こぶし means fist, while 鉄拳 means more specifically a tightly clenched fist. This should come as no surprise to you, as you've already looked it up in dictionaries which say so. It's true that it literally means "iron fist", but it isn't generally used for its literal meaning. ...


8

If I had to try to generalize, I'd say: 下りる is used for moving downward, including a number of metaphorical or idiomatic uses 降りる is used mainly for falling back or getting out of a vehicle But I think it helps to be more specific, so I've put together a little outline with some examples: 下りる Move downward [descend, climb down, fall, fly down, land] ...


8

In colloquial speech, 全然 = 全然ダメ. You can treat this 全然 as a 形容動詞 (I just do not like the word "na-adjective" because it does not exist in Japanese.). So, it is quite natural to say 全然だった in informal speech. ダンスとかあったら全然だったと思う, therefore means: "I think I would have been a total failure if I had had to dance or something."


8

As a customer, using either one is completely fine. Among us native speakers, it is like each person has a habit of using one over the other. Point is each eatery tends to use one word over the other among its staff members as well, meaning that even when you order by saying, for instance, 「[卵]{たまご}なしで = "with no eggs"」, your waiter/waitress might reply ...


7

There is no difference in meaning between 「おいしい」 and 「うまい」 --- "delicious", "tasty", "yummy", etc. --- but there is a difference in usage and nuance. 「おいしい」 sounds more refined and often more feminine than 「うまい」. 「うまい」 sounds more down-to-earth and intuitive, and it could carry a small amount of light vulgarity. If you were a Japanese-speaking parent, ...


7

私たち almost always means "we". 私 almost always means "I". It (and other Japanese words usually translated as personal pronouns in English) can mean "you","him",or "her" in cases where it's obvious from the context - though it's a bit unusual for the word 私 or 私たち. A common example of this 1st to 2nd person pronoun switcheroo happens with the word 僕 (ぼく). 僕 ...


7

In general, you're correct. Calling yourself as sensei has to be avoided, because it's an honorific word. The better word is 教師【きょうし】. However there is an exception. If you are to become Sensei of elementary schools or kindergartens, I think it is OK to say "小学校の先生になりたい", at least informally. Kids do not understand honorific expressions, and teachers in ...


7

In informal situations (like yours, talking to a friend), I see nothing wrong with "先生になりたい" for all kinds of teacher. It is quite common for honorific words to shift towards use as general nouns in informal situations. For example, in informal settings, many will use お母さん (honorable mother) to refer to their own mother.


7

「やんの」 = 「やがる」 + 「の」 It is attached to the て-form of a verb to express one's contempt or disdain for another. It is also used to make fun of a person or action. "The fool did/is doing (this or that)!", "Watch that a**hole do ~~!"


7

「[神様]{かみさま}、[仏様]{ほとけさま}、(one's own name) + [様]{さま}!」, trust me, is NOT something "normal" people would ever say in their entire lives. 橋本環奈 is not a normal person; She is a top idol. It looks like her agency selected that phrase in question as the catch phrase for her to use in self-introduction. The use of the phrase in baseball is the normal use of ...


7

Usually, です is a polite copula, similar to だ but more polite: それはリンゴだ  That is an apple それはリンゴです That is an apple (polite) But です can also be a politeness marker added to adjectives: あかい    is red あかいです  is red (polite) When it's a politeness marker, です doesn't inflect for tense: あかいです    is red (polite) あかかったです  was red (polite) The ...


7

It's basically a shortening of それで何?, meaning something along the lines of 'and so...?' or 'then what?' It asks for either a continuation of the thought (especially in a story or something else temporally organised) or a conclusion (as in 'what you just said is setting something up, what is it?').


7

I think there are no much differences between そうだね, そうだな, そうですね and そうね. To tell the careful thing, そうですね is the polite form, and そうね sounds like (a little bit!) childish. I don't know no other versions except for dialects. By the way, そうですな is not wrong, but it sounds funny. Because if you say so, I feel like you are an elderly gentleman.


7

In real life in 2013, not many people address their partners as 君. It is certainly not obsolete but only a small minority of us use the pronoun. You will hear it much more often in fiction such as song lyrics, manga, dramas, films, etc. Most of us use first names or nicknames instead of pronouns. Some use pronouns like お[前]{まえ}(men to women) and あなた(more ...


7

Transitive vs. Intransitive, period. [開]{あ}ける (akeru) vs. [開]{あ}く (aku) You 開ける the door. vs. The door 開く by itself. 開ける conjugates to 開けて (akete) and 開く conjugates to 開いて (aite).


7

I think it's the second sense for 訪れる in Wiktionary: 季節・状況などがやってくる。 Other dictionaries give similar definitions. Here's the relevant sense from 広辞苑: (ある時期・状況などが)やってくる。「春が訪れる」「世界に平和が訪れる日」 So 最初に訪れる3月末 would mean something like "the first March 31 that arrives", although arrive is a bit literal and we probably don't need to use it in translation, ...


7

住む is to live somewhere in the sense of residency. It's where your house is, where you're staying. It's the same kanji as in 住所{じゅうしょ}, or address. Basically the place where you live. You're right about 棲む. It refers to where an animal lives, like where a bird would make its nest. Googling it I find a lot of literary uses, especially with relation to ...


7

The direct object particle を stands next to the word of phrase that is the direct object in your sentence. This phrase in your translation is 「わたし の てがみ の うえ の つくえ」. To analyse the meaning of this phrase, let's look at its parts: 「わたし の てがみ」 - My letter. 「わたし の てがみ の うえ」 - Above my letter. 「わたし の てがみ の うえ の つくえ」 - The desk above my letter. So the direct ...


6

Assuming that the phrase was taken from this page, the use of 「として」 is 100% correct and natural. You cannot use 「を」 in place of 「として」 because the direct object of that sentence is NOT 「コソアド」. It is 「[指示詞]{しじし}と[疑問詞]{ぎもんし}」 or more formally and appropriately in this context, 「指示詞[及]{およ}び疑問詞」, which was omitted. Thus, it is talking about "treating 指示詞及び疑問詞 ...


6

言えよう = 言えるだろう The よう part is the same as the ろう part of だろう, both originated from む. In modern Japanese, you will use だろう for all verbs, nouns and adjectives for this meaning. But in classic Japanese, you use different forms for them. Although slightly archaic, they are still used in academic writings. よい → よかろう = よいだろう 神だ → 神であろう = 神だろう 言える → 言えよう = ...


6

I will have a try. 人ノ言ヲ懼レズ、己ノ道ヲ進メ ひとのげんをおそれず、おのれのみちをすすめ or 己ノ道ヲ行キ、人ノ言フニ任セヨ おのれのみちをゆき、ひとのいうにまかせよ There is a saying I love very much, but much harder to understand than my translations, if you are not familiar with 漢文. 千万人ト雖モ吾往カン せんまんにんといえどもわれゆかん Original text: 自反而縮。雖千萬人吾往矣。 -- 孟子 公孫丑上 Explanation given by 大辞林: ...


6

Both are used, but the possible reading depends on the meaning. during this time period: このかん or このあいだ (I think both are OK) I have been sitting here for the last two hours. During this period, nobody came. 2時間前からここに座っている。この間【あいだ/かん】、ここには誰も来なかった。 the other day: このあいだ I went to a movie with my family the other day. この間【あいだ】、家族と映画に行きました。


6

This is all-natural conversational Japanese using anastrophe and a minimal number of words. As I commented above, there is absolutely no ambiguity in the phrase for the native speakers. In turn, it is something J-learners are least likely to say themselves as they simply will not arrive at it if they "translate" from their first language. ...


6

The only difference between the two phrases is in their formality level. どのように is more formal (and polite) than どうやって. If you are familiar with the verb やる, you know that it is a casual/conversational verb. やって is a form of やる. What is the verb that is more formal than やる but has the same meaning? It is する. Thus, you can also say どのようにして to mean ...


6

I see little difference in the level of formality. もうすぐ may be, relatively, a bit more casual or colloquial than そろそろ, but, I can't say that そろそろ is a formal or stiff word in general. Only そろそろ has the meaning of "expected time", "high time", "it's about time". You can just say 「そろそろ…。」 when you want to leave now, to interrupt a boring discussion, or to ...



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