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33

It's not real Japanese. It's a munged version of 申します. In Shift_JIS encoding, only the first byte is guaranteed to have the high bit set, which means the second byte can sometimes be the same as a character in the ASCII range. This happens with U+7533 申, for which the second byte is encoded as 0x5C \. If someone is using software that tries to strip ...


23

You are mixing i-adjective かわいい (kawaii, "cute, lovely") with na-adjective かわいそう (kawaisō, "poor, pitiful"). These are simply different, although they share the same etymology. かわいい(かはゆし) actually meant 'pitiful' in old Japanese, but there was a shift in meaning many years ago. We say おいしそう (oishi-sō, "looks yummy"), たのしそう (tanoshi-sō, "looks amusing"), ...


14

First, a brief explanation of the word 「テンション」 for those who are not familiar with it. It does not mean "tension" or "tense". Rather, it refers to "(a level of) excitement or hyperness seen in a person". 「テンション」 is such a frequently-used word that I had to define it first. I know from my personal experience that quite a few J-learners would think that ...


13

"At least" is merely the English translation of the phrases found in bilingual dictionaries. It tells us nothing about how 「せめて」 and 「少なくとも」 are (and are not) used in actual Japanese context. In my Japanese ear, to tell the truth, 「せめて」 and 「少なくとも」 sound like two fairly different types of phrases even though I must admit that they are sometimes actually ...


12

もしもし is like "Hello" and it's used in two kinds of situations: As the very first word of the call ("Hello, this is Tanaka speaking.") As the word to check if the other person can hear you, when the line is noisy or unstable ("Hello? Hello? Can you hear me?") In video calls, you can still safely use もしもし in the second situation. In the first sense, and in ...


10

だ is not the plain form of です. They're related, but you can't use だ everywhere you can use です, so calling one the plain form of the other doesn't work. です has two functions: As a polite copula, similar to だ: りんごだ → りんごです (noun) きれいだ → きれいです (na-adj) As a politeness marker, following i-adjs: うつくしい → うつくしいです (i-adj) i-adjs form complete ...


9

It is, and it is. It's a way to make references to well-known works without the legal headaches that using the actual copyrighted title would. This is quite common in parodies - Gintama for example has used this trick to no end; the anime does this instead by bleeping out a syllable or two as the character states the name. I could be wrong, but from my ...


9

今後 means "from now on", whereas 未来 refers to a time far in the future. Note that 未来 refers to some point in the future, whereas 今後 is something starting from the present, and continuing (indefinitely) into the future. For the near future (even one's own future), you're better off using 将来. 未来 usually has a sense of being farther forward in time than that.


9

Those two words do not assume the same roles. 少{すこ}し is an adverb and 少{すく}ない is an i-adjective. So basically, 少し will modify a verb whereas 少ない will tell that there is not much of something. Some examples. 友達{ともだち}が少ない。I don't have a lot of friends. 時間{じかん}が少なくなった。There is not much time left. (lit. Time has become rarer.) ...


9

幼子 sounds a little old, and we don't use this word in daily conversation. (not so old as we can't understand the meaning.) It also sounds formal, so it is sometimes used in essays or titles of books. Instead of 幼子, we often use 幼児(youji, same as 幼子) or 乳児(nyuuji, a breast-fed baby). They sound more formal than 赤ん坊 or 赤ちゃん.


9

There are two "different" usages of the suffix 「ん」 in question. Type #1: When the final 「ん」 is included in the girl's "official" nickname. This means that the girl is already known to others by the nickname of 「~~~ん/ン」; therefore, practically everyone who knows her addressess her by that nickname. In this usage of 「ん」, there is little to no ...


8

Yes. ~様 is an honorific and can be easily thought of as a more respectful version of ~さん. It is gender neutral, so it can be used by both men and women when addressing either gender. It is often used when addressing someone of a higher social position, or someone for whom you have high regards. On a day-to-day basis, it's commonly used to address ...


8

Although 季【き】 and 節【せつ】 both can mean 'season' within various compounds, they are not used on their own to mean 'season' at least in modern Japanese. You always have to say 季節. Many Japanese compounds are made of two kanji with similar meanings: 危険 (danger + danger), 豊富 (plenty + plenty), 永久 (eternity + eternity), and so on. In most cases, you cannot just ...


8

In short for a general "theatre": 劇場{げきじょう} means a "theatre" as a place. 演劇{えんげき} means the "art of theatre". you were probably looking for 芝居{しばい} - a stage play. also "theatre" as a troupe would be called 劇団{げきだん} The differences get blurred when these words are used as adjectives (search for "screenplay" on google: 演劇の台本 = 48,000, 芝居の台本 = 58,000 ...


8

So 肉{にく} refers to meat in general. It is typically used with an animal to form a particular kind of meat: 牛肉{ぎゅうにく}: Beef 豚肉{ぶたにく}: Pork 鶏肉{とりにく}: Chicken It can also be used to describe the appearance/cut, for example in 挽{ひ}き肉{にく}, minced meat. You talk about カツ: This word does not describe pork meat in general but rather a particular cut of pork ...


7

A phrase that hasn't been mentioned and may prove very useful would be とんでもないです。 とんでもないことでございます。 It's a polite way of saying "not at all". I think どういたしまして is polite, but somehow carries too much the nuance of "You're welcome" in that it accepts the fact that whoever is thanking you is correct in thanking you. とんでもない rejects the very idea of ...


7

The term 「細やか」, as suggested by the letter "細", has the nuance like finesse, delicateness, subtleness, sensitiveness. So when it is used to modify 配慮(concideration/care), the outline of the meaning of the expression "細やかな配慮" is that there has been a careful, adequate and warm care for the students, which supported each student in need. The support was ...


7

Should mean こんにちは (Good day) or depending on the time こんばんわ (Good evening). Same as おは for おはよう :)


7

It's for polite use by both genders, and the most generally used first-person pronoun. While it used to be more for women, this is no longer the case. It is true that women tend to use わたし (watashi) more than other pronouns, but it is not a feminine pronoun†, and it is frequently used by men. It is more polite than others and also used more generally. ...


7

Both ひとまえ and にんまえ exist. 人前【ひとまえ】:(noun) public place; front of the audience. 人前【にんまえ】: (counter) portion of, often for meal. 1 serving = 1人前【にんまえ】. 人前【じんぜん】(式【しき】) : (noun) A certain irreligious style of wedding, as opposed to Christian-, Shinto-, or Buddhism-style weddings.


7

病む doesn't mean / imply vomiting. It is a little literary and usually takes an object to show what is wrong. 精神を病む 結核{けっかく}を病んでいる 吐く is fine. げろげろ吐く sounds vivid, so you might want to avoid. Some people prefer 戻{もど}す because it sounds indirect.


7

Definitely よろしくお願いします or some variant thereof. よろしくお願いします type endings are common when you're thanking somebody in advance. This question on meta on a similar topic might be interesting for you. If you want to stick a simple Japanese phrase on the end of the letter, how about something like: ホームステイをとても楽しみにしています。どうぞよろしくお願いします。 I'm very much looking ...


7

進歩 is advancement to a higher/better/improved stage. Mainly used with scientific/technical ideas. 科学の進歩, コンピュータの進歩, 進歩したエンジン. 進行 is: progress to a advanced (often worse) stage: 癌の進行, 環境破壊が進行した progress of a plan, procedure, task, etc: 予定の進行, 結婚式の進行, 研究の進行状況 running/moving of a train, car, etc: 列車の進行, 進行方向の安全確認


6

It is common for Japanese people to return a thank you rather than accepting the thank you for themselves and saying 'you're welcome'. Aさん: 「〇〇いただき、ありがとうございました。」 Bさん: 「いえいえ、こちらこそありがとうございました。」


6

I'll assume that you aren't literally asking how to conjugate 「思う」 to past tense (which simply put, is just 「思った」), but instead that you are actually asking "how to use it in past tense". What makes this complicated is that 「〜と思う」 doesn't mean "to think ~" (as in, the state of holding some belief). Instead, it means something more like "to have the ...


6

As per my knowledge, 利潤 is used as Profit in economical terms. Where as, 利益 can be used as gains/returns in terms of advantage. For example: 利潤:もちろん、利潤は生産費を上回るべきです。 Benefits of course should exceed the costs. 利益:利益になるような本を読みなさい。 Read the kind of books that teach you something. As you can see, 利益 is usually used in terms of benefit or ...


6

日本語でのご質問ですので、日本語で回答させていただきます。 ご質問にあるような状況において「一緒なように」という表現を用いることは、不自然だと思います。意味は伝わりますが……。 仕事で、相手に何か行動を促したり、目的となる状態や行動を伝えたり等する場合に使う「〜ように」という表現は、一般的には、動詞の後に用います。「動詞+ように」という言い方をすると、伝える内容が明確になりますし、また、くだけていない話し方に聞こえるからです。 「一緒な」は「な形容詞」です。な形容詞の後に直接「〜ように」をつけると、動詞が省略されているように感じる場合が多いです。くだけた表現になっている印象です。 例えば、 A「この機能をより便利に使えるように改良して、新商品として発売しましょう。」 ...


6

I think the reason you aren't finding it is that you're parsing wrong. You should split it as 1コ and then 上. And for this コ, you can think of it as the kanji [個]{こ}, which is one of the most generic counter words in Japanese. See the Wikipedia article on Japanese counter word and ウィキペディア「日本語の助数詞」. 1個上 in this case means 1 level above. So: ...


6

柄 is an old word; Murasaki Shikibu wrote '人のためしにしつべき人柄なり' 1000 years ago. Today 柄 is used in phrases like お日柄、 人柄、銘柄、柄が悪い、お国柄、お家柄、大柄、小柄. The concept has not changed from the old days. 柄 itself is rather about social stereotype than personal impression. When it comes to 柄にもない, the connotation varies depending on whose 柄 is mentioned. If it was my 柄, it ...


6

The easiest and surest way to do it that would leave no room for misunderstanding (and maintain at least the fine newspaper article quality) would be to say: 「新渡戸、内村(の)[両氏自身]{りょうしじしん}」 or 「新渡戸・内村両氏自身」 or 「新渡戸[及]{およ}び内村(の)両氏自身」  「両氏」 can be replaced by 「[両名]{りょうめい}」 without changing any nuance.



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