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8

In short, your waiter said what he said because it is the "in" thing to do for young workers (mostly part-time) at inexpensive restaurants, fast food places, convenience stores, etc. This speech style is called 「マニュアル[敬語]{けいご}」, 「コンビニ[言葉]{ことば}」、「ファミレス言葉」, etc. and it has been very common the last 20 years or so. (マニュアル = "manual", ファミレス = "family ...


7

しょわー I think it's an onomatopoeia of the fizzing sound from soda.


6

There is no one particular Japanese word that you can use everytime you want to use "almost" in English contexts. "I almost fell down." = 「もう[少]{すこ}しで[転]{ころ}ぶところだった。」 That would be by far the most natural Japanese sentence. Native speakers would almost never say 「ほとんど転んだ。」 unless they were trying to sound humorous. You, as a learner, could end up ...


2

Similar to the relationship between だけ and しか, you could also use [危]{あや}うく or [辛]{かろ}うじて with the negation/opposite of what you are trying to say. Since these words mean "barely", the negation/opposite of the premise would translate together as "almost". 例文: 危うく終電に間にあった。 → I barely caught the last train home. → implies "I almost missed the last ...


1

From my personal experience, 「亡くなる」 is the most neutral word. 「先生のお父さんはがんで亡くなられたよ」 - "Our teacher's father died from cancer" 「死ぬ」 is a strong word that is usually avoided by polite people, but is used to express emphasis or to deliberately offend. It can also be used to talk about animals. 「勝手に死ね!」 - Literally, "Die on your own!", but is very strong and ...


1

It depends on how it is used. If the customer had made all the orders, and the waiter is making a confirmation going through the orders, and if the non-past tense is used, then it will sound like the waiter simply forgot the order and is asking for the second time with a guess. That can be rude. By using the past tense, it expresses that the customer's ...



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