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5

会社の名前{なまえ} consists of two nouns, one describing the other. The one with の is in genitive case which is used to indicate possession in this case. It's roughly equivalent to 's or of in English: company's name or the name of the company (both are translated to 会社の名前). Note that 名前 is a native Japanese word and it uses kun-yomi reading of the kanji in this ...


5

Usually, a common word like kaisha will only ever be written as かいしゃ instead of 会社 in these two cases: When accomodating for young children or non-Japanese speakers who might not be able to read kanji (yet). For stylistic/typographic purposes. For example, as part of an all-hiragana name of a company on a billboard. Just another way to stand out in an ...


3

Basically, from low to high (and high to low) お疲れさまです from high to low ご苦労様です お疲れさん ご苦労さん In many cases, the act of 省略 generally decreases the level of honour.


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The nature of sound shortening is often, due to the environment that spawns such changes, rather 'casual' and colloquial. Much like how 様 and さん have relatively different levels of 'politeness' so do お疲れさま and お疲れさん. (Speaking merely from personal experience, I have only used お疲れさん among friends and casual acquaintances in informal situations. Among equal ...


3

Your observation is correct. I'm not sure about the etymology, but as a matter of fact, we can use 「お疲れさん」 to someone whose status is equal to or lower than ourselves. Addressing it to your boss is clearly rude. Personally, I usually stick to 「お疲れさまです」 in a business setting, because I think saying お疲れさん is over-friendly and shows little or no respect. Even ...


2

会社{かいしゃ}の名前{なまえ} is grammatically fine, and while compound nouns are sometimes formed by simply eliminating the の particle (e.g.,本{ほん}の棚{たな} -> 本棚{ほんだな} or 勉強{べんきょう}の不足{ふそく} -> 勉強不足{べんきょうぶそく}), in this case the word you are looking for is: 会社名{かいしゃめい} (the on-yomi of 名 is generally used in compound nouns and has the same meaning as 名前{なまえ} as a whole: name). ...


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One of the uses of the の particle (that you will learn early on in Japanese) is to show possession. "Company Name" is the same as "Company's Name". Company's Name = 会社の名前


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According to my dictionary, かいしゃ (hiragana) can mean either a company/corporation/workplace or a household word/universal praise. I'd stick with writing the word 会社 in kanji to be more specific and avoid any confusion. It's also good practice to get as much exposure to kanji as you can early on. It'll help you out big time when reading more advanced ...


2

Neither of those are common-use pronouns, but for different reasons - one isn't common-use, the other isn't a pronoun. I'll explain. 我が輩 is a relatively unusual first-person pronoun. It is used in exactly two contexts: When a male speaker wants to sound stuck-up and self-important - almost always in fiction, and often with noticeably more literary speech ...



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