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20

You are mixing i-adjective かわいい (kawaii, "cute, lovely") with na-adjective かわいそう (kawaisō, "poor, pitiful"). These are simply different, although they share the same etymology. かわいい(かはゆし) actually meant 'pitiful' in old Japanese, but there was a shift in meaning many years ago. We say おいしそう (oishi-sō, "looks yummy"), たのしそう (tanoshi-sō, "looks amusing"), ...


6

A phrase that hasn't been mentioned and may prove very useful would be とんでもないです。 とんでもないことでございます。 It's a polite way of saying "not at all". I think どういたしまして is polite, but somehow carries too much the nuance of "You're welcome" in that it accepts the fact that whoever is thanking you is correct in thanking you. とんでもない rejects the very idea of ...


5

修行 is primarily used for (endless/lifelong) religious discipline; it's something Buddhist monks or priests do every day. Note that this kanji 行 (gyō) on its own means 'religious training/discipline/practice', as in 行者 (gyōja, person who does 修行, especially that of 修験道), 滝行 (takigyō, waterfall meditation), 苦行 (kugyō, hard discipline), etc. You can also use 修行 ...


5

A lot has changed, IMO one good way is to compare newspapers from the days. This one is from the Meiji era: http://www.geocities.jp/tanaka_kunitaka/takeshima/saninshimbun/02.gif This one from during WW2: http://userdisk.webry.biglobe.ne.jp/005/523/32/N000/000/000/123528635262516412541.jpg This is from 1960: ...


5

It is common for Japanese people to return a thank you rather than accepting the thank you for themselves and saying 'you're welcome'. Aさん: 「〇〇いただき、ありがとうございました。」 Bさん: 「いえいえ、こちらこそありがとうございました。」


5

Just copied & pasted from my half-year-old answer (though the question itself isn't a duplicate): Though I translated 日本語を話す into "speak Japanese", the verb doesn't have "be able to speak" sense, so every time you have to explicitly use potential form when you question about ability. 日本語が話せますか? Do you speak Japanese? compared ...


4

Let's say we have this long and easy sentence: iPhone 6 Plusは速くなって、(かつ)大きくなった。 iPhone 6 Plus became faster, and (at the same time) became larger. You can omit the first なる like this: iPhone 6 Plusは速くて、(かつ)大きくなった。 iPhone 6 Plus became faster and (at the same time) larger. Note that, in this form, the comma is optional. 「iPhone 6 ...


4

First of all, 「おつかれさまでしたどぞ」 is not a common phrase at all. From your description, however, I am pretty sure what was going on. The Japanese counterpart of "Over" used in wireless communications to mean "a message is complete" is 「どうぞ」 and it is often pronounced like 「どぞ」 to shorten it. Thus, I would think that the boss was kidding by speaking like he ...


4

Conceptually speaking でもあった is what you get by trying to combine だった and も (as in "also"). だった is a contraction of であった and you have to use the uncontracted form in order to insert も after で. So でもあった means "it also was". (In the non-past tense, the same thing happens: "だ + も = でもある".)


3

You answered your own question. It is こ/コ/子{こ}/娘{こ}, etc. In this particular context, it means a "girl". 「ちょっとイケないコになっちゃう」 means "I become a slightly 'bad' girl."


2

私は少し日本語を話します。 I will speak a little Japanese. (starting now) 私は少し日本語を話せます。 I can speak a little Japanese. (the ability to speak) On a side note, a quick grammar fix (leaving word order as is) 私は少し日本語が話せます。


2

「[青々]{あおあお}とした[芝生]{しばふ}」 has the same meaning as 「青々した芝生」. 「と」 makes no difference to the meaning. Both expressions are often used in Japan. I'm Japanese and forgot details about Japanese language grammar after graduation. But I think I know how to use Japanese language. So please let me try to explain the usage difference between 「青々した」 and 「青々とした」.   ...


2

This 'instead' was kindly inserted by the translator because the speaker did not use も (=also, as well) in the original sentence. It's the absence of も that implies the speaker is suggesting buying something else instead. 靴(を)買うならTシャツも買っては? If you're going to buy shoes, why don't you buy a T-shirt as well? 靴(を)買うならTシャツ(を)買っては? If you're going to ...


2

I don't know exactly why 船越義珍 used 修業 since 修行 would also make sense. But since he did, I think the quote should only be considered correct the way you stated it: 空手の修業は一生である。 Firstly, since you probably don't know, 修 is often pronounced しゅう (shū, long U), but in both 修業 and 修行, it may be pronounced しゅ (shu, short U), so there are three words, しゅぎょう ...


1

The word 修業 is used for something you can complete/graduate/master. This is why we use 卒業 to express a graduation from something. I think we never use 卒行 in this situation. At least I have never seen 卒行 in my life. On the other hand, the word 修行 is used for something you can not complete. Thus, when you say Karate is a lifelong pursuit. 修行 does fit ...



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