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12

もしもし is like "Hello" and it's used in two kinds of situations: As the very first word of the call ("Hello, this is Tanaka speaking.") As the word to check if the other person can hear you, when the line is noisy or unstable ("Hello? Hello? Can you hear me?") In video calls, you can still safely use もしもし in the second situation. In the first sense, and in ...


9

There are two "different" usages of the suffix 「ん」 in question. Type #1: When the final 「ん」 is included in the girl's "official" nickname. This means that the girl is already known to others by the nickname of 「~~~ん/ン」; therefore, practically everyone who knows her addressess her by that nickname. In this usage of 「ん」, there is little to no ...


7

進歩 is advancement to a higher/better/improved stage. Mainly used with scientific/technical ideas. 科学の進歩, コンピュータの進歩, 進歩したエンジン. 進行 is: progress to a advanced (often worse) stage: 癌の進行, 環境破壊が進行した progress of a plan, procedure, task, etc: 予定の進行, 結婚式の進行, 研究の進行状況 running/moving of a train, car, etc: 列車の進行, 進行方向の安全確認


4

「でしか」is simply the で particle combined with the しか particle. The で particle here indicates an instrument or method used to carry out the main action (特殊召喚 in this case). It can be roughly translated as "with" or "using". Thus,「融合召喚で」can be translated to "using fusion summon" or something similar. The しか particle means "only". It can be added onto other ...


4

"ようこそ、いらっしゃいませ" and "ようこそ、お越しやす," its popular Kansai version are a set of phrases welcoming the guest. "ようこそ" is a variation of "よくこそ" meaning “true / indeed / rightly.” よくこそ is used in such way as; よくこそ言ってくれた - Indeed, you said exactly what I wish to say. よくこそここまで来た - Really (Thank God), we came a long way up to here. Though the phrase, “いらっしゃいませ – ...


3

もしもし is a kind of signal to start talking, so it is not strange to start conversation with it. In this usage, it may be a bit strange on Skype. もしもし is used if you want to make sure your conversation partner can hear you. In this usage, you can say もしもし.


2

You definitely do use it on Skype, but only for audio only calls, not when you also have a video feed and can see the other person. It's usually followed by 聞こえますか? (can you hear me?) when on Skype. Normally on the phone you wouldn't bother asking 聞こえますか? after you say もしもし because もしもし is already intended to serve that purpose of signalling that you are on ...


2

There is a good explanation here: 【1】「[同義語]{どうぎご}」は、「あす」と「あした」などのように、[全く]{まったく}[同じ]{おなじ}[意味]{いみ}で[表記]{ひょうき}や[発音]{はつおん}が[異なる]{ことなる}[語]{ご}。 【2】「類義語」「類語」「シノニム」は、「あがる」と「のぼる」、「[遊戯]{ゆうぎ}」と「ゲーム」などのように、意味の似た語をさす。 【3】「同義語」と「類義語」とを区別せずに用いることもある。 (1) 同義語 refers to words that have the exact same meaning, but that have a different spelling or ...


2

いえども is a formal / fancy (and archaic) way of saying 言{い}っても. So だといえども = だといっても. A sentence like 「XXXだといっても」 could parse out to "so even if you're saying that XXX, ..." Background The -ど verb ending is very old in Japanese, appearing in the Kojiki and the Man'yōshū, some of the earliest writing ever in the Japanese language. It attaches to the ...


1

Both 氏名 and 名前 mean the full name of person except for the case of 名前 being used as the name of anything under the sun. 氏名 is also called 姓名 (せいめい). The literal translation of 氏 and 姓 is the name of a family or old clan like 藤原氏、源氏、平家、足利氏 and 名 is a name, primarily the first name like 太郎 and 花子. 氏名 and 姓名 are formal expressions of 名前, and used often in the ...


1

You'd use 「[結論]{けつろん}を[下]{くだ}す」 or 「結論づける」 for "to conclude", so for "I concluded (that) ~~" you'd normally say 「私は~~との (or ~~という)結論を下した。」 or 「私は~~と結論づけた。」


1

The past-tense ~た時 pattern is used when the action is completed relative to the main clause. The present-tense ~る時 pattern is used when the action has not yet been completed relative to the main clause. A common example to illustrate the difference: 日本に行くとき、カメラを買った。 On the way to Japan, I bought a camera. (The action of "going" isn't complete yet.) ...


1

In this sentence, you could replace それなりに with そこそこ and だと with だそう with little meaning changes. それなりに is being used here as an intensifier. It depends a lot on context and speaker, but in this case it'd probably be somewhere in between とても and ある程度. In English, perhaps "quite or "somewhat" would be close approximations. だと can be thought of just an ...


1

と On the contrary, your following section is super important, so that I can know the と isn't at the end of the sentence but qualifies the next verb. The whole clause before と is supposed to go to a verb phrase 買いかぶっていた "had been overrated", which is separated into two parts 買いかぶり + していた during the insertion of など, making the original form obscured. After ...



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