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8

As a customer, using either one is completely fine. Among us native speakers, it is like each person has a habit of using one over the other. Point is each eatery tends to use one word over the other among its staff members as well, meaning that even when you order by saying, for instance, 「[卵]{たまご}なしで = "with no eggs"」, your waiter/waitress might reply ...


7

The direct object particle を stands next to the word of phrase that is the direct object in your sentence. This phrase in your translation is 「わたし の てがみ の うえ の つくえ」. To analyse the meaning of this phrase, let's look at its parts: 「わたし の てがみ」 - My letter. 「わたし の てがみ の うえ」 - Above my letter. 「わたし の てがみ の うえ の つくえ」 - The desk above my letter. So the direct ...


7

In informal situations (like yours, talking to a friend), I see nothing wrong with "先生になりたい" for all kinds of teacher. It is quite common for honorific words to shift towards use as general nouns in informal situations. For example, in informal settings, many will use お母さん (honorable mother) to refer to their own mother.


7

In general, you're correct. Calling yourself as sensei has to be avoided, because it's an honorific word. The better word is 教師【きょうし】. However there is an exception. If you are to become Sensei of elementary schools or kindergartens, I think it is OK to say "小学校の先生になりたい", at least informally. Kids do not understand honorific expressions, and teachers in ...


6

I see little difference in the level of formality. もうすぐ may be, relatively, a bit more casual or colloquial than そろそろ, but, I can't say that そろそろ is a formal or stiff word in general. Only そろそろ has the meaning of "expected time", "high time", "it's about time". You can just say 「そろそろ…。」 when you want to leave now, to interrupt a boring discussion, or to ...


6

The only difference between the two phrases is in their formality level. どのように is more formal (and polite) than どうやって. If you are familiar with the verb やる, you know that it is a casual/conversational verb. やって is a form of やる. What is the verb that is more formal than やる but has the same meaning? It is する. Thus, you can also say どのようにして to mean ...


5

I think @ssb's どうすることもできない would work. I'd like to add some more phrases: (~に)どうこうできることではない。 (~に)どうこうできるものでもない(orではない)。 (~に/~の力で)何とかできるものでもない。 (~には/~の力では)どうにもできない。 (~の力では)なんともならない。 etc. 例文: どんなにチームが好きだからって、試合ばかりは私にどうこうできるものでもない。 明日は晴れるといいけど、こればっかりはどうにもできないなあ。 You also have a more literary phrase: ~~の力の[及]{およ}ぶところではない。 例文: ...


4

There are a few verbs that do this. It's not just 思う but also 考える. I tried coming up with an English parallel but after a few goes decided that they don't work. The source difference as I see it is that the Japanese language has a stricter account of philosophy of mind that works from the idea that we don't have access to the thoughts and feelings of ...


4

One way to do it is just to say コントロールできない. 試合(の結果)はコントロールできない Another might be to say どうすることもできない. Glancing on alc, I found one interesting expression: あずかり知らぬところである. It's used in this sentence: "have no control over how the dice of life are cast" 人生のさいころの目がどう出るかは自分のあずかり知らぬところである That said, you probably don't want to spout this one off in everyday ...


4

If you mean a classroom teacher as an occupation, I think the general term is 教師{きょうし}. 先生{せんせい} is rather used as a suffix after names or to address/talk about a particular person in honorific terms.


4

First, it looks like you are somehow seeing a word that is simply not there -- 「[当]{あ}たり」 --, which is preventing you from understanding this sentence even without the word 「[虚]{うつ}ろ」. The word that you should be seeing instead is 「[辺]{あた}り」. 「このあたり」 means "around here/there". Unlike 当たり、辺り is very often written in kana. (For the pronunciation-conscious ...


4

I'm a bit uncertain where the question "is it just verb plain form" is coming from here, since つもり functions as a regular noun/nominal grammatically. It means something like intention or expectation, where the specifics of the intention modify the つもり by coming before it.


3

Different types of ~そう I think it's best to consider adjective + そう and verb + そう separately, because they have slightly different meanings. In particular, with verbs, そう has the sense of something close to happening or about to happen in the near future, but with adjectives... not really. 雨が降りそうだ。 It looks like it's about to rain. (near future) ...


3

「そんなの」etc. is used in the way that you described. It is not very respectful towards whatever you are referring to or the audience. Usually you will be considerate of who the audience is. For example, I would only use this when talking to my close 'buddies' or family but would never use this in a work setting or speaking to someone I am not close to. I do ...


2

In the first sentence, you are talking about the desk, specifically, "don't read the desk." The rest of the sentence describes more about the desk (on top of the letter of mine). In the second sentence, the letter is marked as the object, and is the thing that is not to be read.



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