New answers tagged

1

立腹 is a noun meaning "getting anger." You can verbalize it by saying "立腹する." A more collocual form of 立腹する is 腹を立てる. Perhaps 立腹 came from 腹を立てる. I can't tell which one of a boy and dog got angry fom the catoon.


1

I was looking for some more context and I found out that the sentence you are asking about is probably part of the lyrics of a song called "Brave Shine". I have found a full translation of the lyrics here: http://leirion63.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-21.html The whole translation is not perfectly literal though, but I think in general it makes sense and it ...


0

This is related to the pattern A(だ)(と)いえばA´ and other ~といえば expressions. このコーヒーはおいしいといえばおいしいけど、高くない? The coffee is good, but don't you think it's a little expensive? 明日といえば、テストがあるって先生が言ってなかったっけ? Speaking of tomorrow, didn't the teacher say that we have a test? 飲み物といえばビールでしょ! When it comes to drinks nothing beats beer! yeah? Your example ...


2

"Does "シャッターチャンス" (wasei-eigo based on "shutter chance") have the same connotations?" No, absolutely not. The word 「シャッターチャンス」 is not used for the "other" meaning you mentioned. "If not, how would I refer to a photo op in the politics/PR sense?" I do not think that there is an exact equivalent everyone would agree on that actually "feels" like ...


1

The kanji means anger, and the expression of the girl's face is expressing anger toward her dog for not moving. So it's quite fit.


5

「(Name of profession or role one is in charge of) + さん」 is a very common way of addressing and referring to people in Japanese. 「[担当]{たんとう}」 is a person who has been put in charge of a task, and s/he works with/for you. You may address or refer to him/her as 「担当さん」. Translating 「担当さん」, however, would be a little difficult because this particular ...


5

'担当' is a noun to mean 'to take charge of sth.' 'さん’ is an honorific suffix like Mr. and Ms. as you know. "担当さん" is a vocative to mean "Mr./Ms. someone in charge of business." It's widely used when the name, title and position of a person who handles business, request, and procedure of a client, customer, and resident in an organization e.g. companies, ...


4

「かっこいポーズのリクストにこたえてくれました 。」 would be a perfect sentence if you changed 「リクスト」 to 「リクエスト」 and 「かっこい」 to 「かっこいい」. 「かっこいいポーズのリクエストにこたえてくれました 。」 = "(Someone) responded to my/our request for a cool-looking pose." 「~~に[応]{こた}える」 = "to respond to ~~" ← The only correct particle is 「に」 here.


4

「尋ねられもしないこと」 means "something that is not even asked." Breakdown: 尋ねられ -- verb 尋ねる + passive られる も -- binding particle (係助詞) "even" しない -- verb する + negative ない こと -- noun (事) "thing, something" 「the continuative form (連用形) of a verb + もしない」 means "don't even do~~", eg: 「知りもしない」 「見もしない」 尋ねられもしないことをこちらからわざわざ連絡するつもりはない。 literally means "We have no ...


1

Peshuu~ is like 'Psshhhhhsh' sound coming out from a can. And 3つ might be みっつ japanese counting of 3. As in ひとつ、ふたつ、みっつ、etc. くらい Is approximately, so the meaning of 3つくらい is 'approximately three (things) '


1

I think 尋ねられもしないこと in this sentence means "the answer for the questions which isn't asked by police".


2

It seems it is talking of some wooden sickle to be used in some matsuri like 地鎮祭{じちんさい}. I am not 100% sure (there is not even much context) but I think the sentence you are discussing can be translated simply as: a standard/regular (that is, a real) sickle is used as reference when looking at the details. I guess the point is that the wooden one is made ...


4

I haven't seen much 自己意識する outside philosophical books, and moreover it'd mean "be self-conscious" or "be self-aware". Better literal word for "self-identify" would be 自己認識: LGBTと自己認識している人々 But I don't think it is a sophisticated enough word for other than academic papers (i.e. for those already know what "self-identify" means). You could also use ...


1

Self-identity is often translated as 自己同一性, but I would translate the quoted phrase, "people self-identifies as LGBT" as "LGBTとして自己認識するする人(人々), or LGBTとして自主張識する人(人々).


2

I suggest LGBTとして生きている方々. I feel 自己意識 is a bit hard.


2

No, it is not 安い; it is 易い. [Verb stem] + やすい means "easy to 〜". So it is a uniform that is "easy to see" (or possibly figuratively "looks good").


1

For 駐在員 , I think "local staff" is sufficient. Then your phrase can, depending on the context, be translated as "the parent company of the local office". However, it is difficult to give a satisfactory translation without the whole sentence.


5

わかりあえない is a negative potential form of わかりあう (分かり合う) わかりあう:To understand each other / to comprehend わかりあえる:(potential form) Able to understand each other / comprehend わかりあえない : (negative-potential form) Not Able to understand each other / comprehend


0

It's probably 買ってみた and not 買て since て-form of 買う is 買って. [制服を買ってみた] のは [はじめて] です • 制服: Seifuku (school uniform) • 買う: Kau (to buy) • 買ってみた:Tried things then bought it. みた is the past form of 見る。 -> Formula (V-て) + みる(look) : Do something in order to see what will happens / see the result of it (Try) • のは is particle. The の package [Try ...


3

<テ形> みる means "try (something) and see," and in this sentence の turns the preceding verbal phrase into a noun describing the action, "the time [I] tried (doing something)". は marks this whole thing as the topic of the sentence. It's not quite "I got a uniform," I don't think, but that's the gist of it; I might say "This is the first time I tried to buy a ...


1

It's 決める時に、いくつか. I.e. I got a few, when we decided on the design.


5

Yeah, pretty sure デコグッズ is a short for デコレーショングッズ, which literally means "decoration goods". たも is a kind of a fishing net, you can see what it looks like if you search for it in Google Images. I don't know what dictionary you're using, but for example jisho.org knows what it is. Or were you confused by the fact that it's written in katakana here? That's ...


1

That is: リミット資料館{しりょうかん}~絵{え}を[描]{えが}くときに役立{やくだ}っているモノたち~ 資料館 means indeed museum, reference library, archive. The second part of the the sentence I think could be translated as "useful things when drawing a picture/making a painting". That モノ is indeed 物 and probably is in katakana to put emphasis on that word (in Japanese often katakana is used in that ...


-1

I'll just say "Limit museum" as it's just a name. As for モノ, it's the same word as 物 but it sounds a bit more "likable" or kind of cute if that makes sense.


3

「パシャ」 is the onomatopoeia for the sound made when pressing on the shutter-release button on a camera. 「しみる」 has many meanings, but your image would suggest that the word is being used for the meaning of "I'm deeply moved." or "(Something) is going straight to my heart."


3

How about "keep going, I want to think positively."? くじける means collapse, falter, stagger. ず is a old verbal auxiliary of ない which is used as negative. The Literal translation of 前を向く is "face forward" but it is often used as the meaning of " to think positively".


2

預金 is the actual money in the bank. It isn't a short form for 預金口座. 口座 is an account in banks. 当座預金 is mainly used by companies and a sole proprietor and checks and bills instead of money are used there. 当座預金口座 is an account of 当座預金 in banks. 預金残高 is a credit balance, that is to say, the actual money in the bank. In addition, the word "account" have some ...


3

I guess that this is one of those examples where translation becomes really hard and, in a way, a bit ambiguous either way. At this point I would rather see the general meaning in Japanese and associate it to whatever the closest image that I can get in my mind, rather than thinking of a specific word. However, when we have to translate, we need words and ...


3

「動けば雷電の如く、 発すれば風雨の如し」is not a quote from Takasugi Shinsaku. It’s a phrase dedicated by Takasugi’s coleague in Yoshida Shoin's private school, 松下村塾, and then Japan’s first Prime Minister, Ito Hirobumi as a part of the epitaph engraved in the monument of Takasugi Shinsaku situated in a corner of 東行庵 in Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi Pref. It was built on May 20, 1911, ...


1

Judging from the all-kana sentence, I'm guessing that this is a beginner question, and as naruto answered, it means "Was Mr. Yamashita a child?" without any other context. That said, and just for the fun of scaring beginners, this sentence can also mean "Does Mr. Yamashita have children?", specifically "You, Mr. Yamashita, have children, right?" ...


1

「山下先生は子供でしたか?」 literally means "Was Mr. Yamashita a child?" or "Was Mr. Yamashita childish (at that time)?" 子供だ/子供です means being a child, not having a child, of course. 子供だ sometimes can metaphorically mean "childish". "Did Mr. Yamashita have a child?" is 「山下先生には子供がいましたか?」


4

「カッコイイのやってみたいと[思]{おも}ってます。」= 「カッコイイの + を + やってみたいと思ってます。」 「の」 is a nominalizer that turns the adjective 「カッコイイ」 into a noun-like form - "a カッコイイ one". What the thing is should be clear to you from the context. We have no way of knowing it here. "I'm hoping to pull off a good one." (I just used the adjective "good" because I do not know what ...


11

「そんなにゲームばかりして、目が悪くなっても知らないわよ。」 And your TL is: "If you play so many games, your eyes will get bad even if you don't know." The part that you mistranslated, interestingly, is not even the "ても" part ("even if"). Rather it was the unmentioned subject of the verb 「知らない」. It is the speaker who 知らない, not the game-player she is talking to. (I am ...


7

「[動]{うご}けば[雷電]{らいでん}の[如]{ごと}く、[発]{はっ}すれば[風雨]{ふうう}の如し。」 You state that this is a quote from Takasugi, but it is not. This is how Takasugi was metaphorically described by others. This page gives a good translation of the phrase. "Moving like the lightning, speaking like the storm." 「発する」 means "to utter words" ⇒ "to speak"


4

Neither of the two is slang, really. 「デカい」 is an informal word for 「[大]{おお}きい」. It should be found in every dictionary. 「とろい」 is a regular dictionary word meaning "dull", "stupid", etc. Perhaps the katakana part fooled you. That is just to give the word a slangy look and feel. 「デカく」 and 「トロく」 are just the continuative forms of 「デカい」 and 「トロい」, ...


3

「[不況]{ふきょう}のせいでリストラされたので、しばらく(   )[自由]{じゆう}を[楽]{たの}しむことにした。」 "Since I was laid off owing to the recession, I have decided to enjoy my freedom ~~~~ly for a while." There are dozens of words in Japanese that take the form of 「〇っ〇り」 (second kana is the small っ). Over 95% of those are adverbs and many have an onomatopoeic quality to them. A few ...


0

げっそり自由 is strange.こっそり自由(家族に対して) is natural. こっそり's meaning is hiding for something.げっそり is used like "げっそり痩せた".


1

Does simplifying it to the following help? Aは、B面のA、または、C面のAとして分類する 固有の特徴は,機能面の特徴又は品質面の特徴として分類することができる。 Characteristic features can be divided in terms of function or quality. That is, the inherent / unique properties of something can be divided / classified into groups based on whether those properties are something that the thing can perform (function), ...


3

I found the dialogs in the last ten minutes of Holy Knight OVA vol.2. Your transcription is almost correct. いいね……その喋り方……ごみは必死に奉仕しないと生き残れないものね。 カスが命を与えられて現世【げんせ】にまで生きてるなんて信じたくない話だ。神はむごいことをなさる。 The consonant //g// in the middle of word is normally reduced to [[ɣ]], which I guess you tend to fail to detect.


3

「[持]{も}ち[込]{こ}んだ[荷物]{にもつ}を[​商]{あきな}​いせず」 「商い」 means "business", "vending", etc. 「せず」=「しない」 in meaning. 「商いせず」, therefore, means "not selling", "not trading", etc. The whole phrase, thus, means "(Someone is) not selling the stuff that he has brought in."


5

Actually, I feel that the ですが。。。ですが。。。 does feel a little repetitive and awkward to me, but that's a pretty minor thing. You could remove the last が as one option to remove the repetition. However, I think what's most important here is how you express the rest of the sentence. First, saying "下手" sounds overly blatant, especially with the なん after it to make ...


-2

It's definitely not awkward! To wish good will onto someone else you use the verb in its short form plus といいです。 So for example  「いい仕事が見つかるといいですね。」。 - ii shigoto ga mitsukaru to ii desu ne - "I hope you find a good job." When hoping for something good to happen to you use といいんですが。 いい仕事が見つかるといいんですが。 "I hope I find a good job." I would say ...


2

Looking at the 漢字 is quite informative. You can see that 募集 is made of 募+集. Interestingly, both can be used to build verbs: 募る (to recruit) and 集まる (to gather). So 募集 means "gathering applicants" (or something like that). 募集 is seen a lot in the form of 募集中 (We are recruiting now). Note: The use of 募集 may not be limited to work: even if it can feel a little ...


4

〜[三昧]{ざんまい}: to be absorbed in ~ だと: Here, it means he was thinking about something, an abbreviation of 〜だと思って... 帰宅: return home しようとする: to try to do something (often used when the action didn't actually complete) So, putting this together we get a translation like: It was then, on his way home after getting his hands on a new game, ...


3

Looking at this question here it seems as though 募集 refers to the planning of recruitment whereas 採用 refers to recruitment where the person/group decision has been made. If you look a bit into the kanji, 募集 contains 集 which means to gather, bring together whereas 採用 contains 用 which means to use. Also, 募集 usually refers to recruitment whereas 採用 refers to ...


1

As your sentence is 持って行っていい. していい means "be allowed to". 持っていっ is a euphonic change of 持っていき, which is 連用形(te-form) of 持っていく.


2

The structure of this sentence is a bit strange to me (maybe I'm just confused by punctuation). Anyway, I guess that the と you are discussing here is used just as in the usual すると type of construction (plain verb + と). So, in this case, I think that it's OK to translate it with when in English, as this form generally describes a cause/effect kind of ...


2

That means no problem. 問題 is translated to a problem. ない is 無い. "Aが無い" is translated to "There is not A."


2

まだ食べていない means "I haven't eaten it yet". まだ食べない means "I won't eat it for the time being".


1

First of all I am not a translator. I have done some scanlation but we all know that doesn't count. Anyway, my opinion: 3: Translate "よろしくお願い致します". Even though it can't be directly and absolutely translated, do translate it, because it carries a lot of meaning. I think anyone who knows even a bit Japanese understands that. 2:Really depends on you, I don't ...



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