New answers tagged

3

How about 気楽【きらく】 or 気軽【きがる】 (na-adjectives)? These words imply that the content is not so serious nor thought-provoking. 気軽に読める本 気軽な読み物/小説 Another option would be 手軽【てがる】 (na-adjective), although this may tend to imply the volume of the content (ie, the number of words in a book) is small. As you already know, ライトノベル refers to a certain genre of novel ...


1

You could possibly say that a book is 読みやすい, meaning easy to read. That wouldn't carry the connotation of a certain kind of book, but lets you know that it's not super dense.


0

alc.co.jp seems to be a very nice website that I just bookmarked. There are a lot of kanjis but they are using simple Japanese. いいえ、まだ食べていません。Emphasis is put on the current state (of the conversation). Well at least this is what they want to say by 現在の状態. いいえ、まだ食べません。Emphasis is put on the fact that wether the action is over or not, has been ...


4

We often see the first or all letters being capitalized in Western legal documents and agreement forms, or in the case of characterizing or emphasizing the subject in a statement in journalism. The example, "WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be signed" you suggested looks very odd, if it's done in an official Japanese ...


1

Apparently the meaning of "まだ…~ない(ません)" differs depending on the type of a verb. transitive verbs or intransitive verbs (unergative): ☆~ていません もうご飯を食べましたか。 Have you eaten yet? いいえ、まだ食べていません。 No, I haven't eaten yet. ☆~ません 今からご飯を食べますか。 Are you going to eat now? いいえ、まだ食べません。 No, I'm not going to eat yet. intransitive verbs (unaccusative): ☆~ていません/~ません ...


0

I think いい格好してました would do the trick.


0

From what I understand (which may or may not be correct), the nuance is on the implied intent. → まだ食べません would be "I'm not eating yet". There is some implicit meaning that you are going to eat next, or very soon. Emphasis is put on the action. → まだ食べていません would be "I haven't eaten". In that case, the emphasis is put on the fact that you have not eaten, but ...


0

Here is a reference going in the opposite direction J->E, about how to translating すてきなかっこう(素敵な格好)(suteki na kakkou) as "Nice look!/I like your outfit!" http://news.mynavi.jp/news/2013/06/13/123/


3

I think the issue here is that you are explicitly trying to map the English word "look(ed)" into a Japanese verb, when you don't really need to. Learn to think in Japanese, don't (always) try to translate your thoughts from English. So instead of trying to find a verb, you can just say that their clothes/style/whatever were cool. ...


5

Think about it in terms of context. If you are in a space without any language, what are the traits and qualities you want to convey? Read the Japanese and try and emulate the context, then from the context go to English. Trying to find one-to-one corollaries is interesting and good for word-by-word translating, but for conveying meaning correctly, we ...


0

We don't have a Japanese counterpart to shirtfront as a verb, perhaps because Japanese didn't wear a western-style shirt until Meiji era. Our ancesters wore 襦袢 (Juban). Instead we have: 1.胸倉(むなぐら)を掴(つか)む meaning "to grasp sb. by the chest." 2.頭突(づつ)きを食(く)らわす meaning "to strike sb. (possibly on the chest) with one's head." When you strike sb. with your ...


1

I think- ★Yoshio-san's car is red and white. is most correct translation. The second translation, ★Yoshio-san's cars are (one) red and (the other) white just make CARS as plural, but the sense is not changed as Yoshio-san has 2 cars out of which one in red and other is white. It can mean that "All the cars Yoshio-san has are red and white".


4

Depending on the context and circumstances, it could actually mean EITHER Just by itself, one could say it means "Yoshio-san's car is red and white"


0

That なの or any other のだ forms indicate that information that's accompanied with it is one to complement existing context. (In sentences of statement, it functions as explanation of background for a preceding topic.) In your example, it's probably used in a situation where you reconfirm it after your opponent said that all the sushi there are 100 yen, or so. ...


0

Very literally speaking, なの consists of a nominal adjective marker な and a nominalizer particle の. This sounds like a roundabout way to say 'is/ is something like', which makes it understandable that it is mainly used by females. When used in a question, the か is sometimes omitted.


3

You filled in "they" in the latter part of the sentence even there is no such word in the original, right? Then naturally you can add an implicit object in the first part, too. When NHK asked them at 73 shelters that are mainly located in Kumamoto, they said... Or if you're uncomfortable with the translation, you can reword it as: As NHK had ...


3

Translating loosely: Matsusaka steak for me? Dear, don't bother about me. Don't bother shopping for me. Don't bother with Matsusaka beef. おかあさん literally means mother, but oftentimes you'll hear husbands (especially older ones) calling their wives おかあさん. To answer your questions: Yes 私はステーキなんていいから means something like "I don't need things such as ...


3

This is an interesting question for me as I came across the same problem several times in the past (that is, realized that in several occasion I was not sure how to properly translate "organize" referred to an event). After some research and asking around a little bit, probably for the specific case of an "event" I learned that the best match would be ...


3

企画する would be a good one I think.


2

鬱 is a rarely used kanji due to its complexity (I think this is the most complicated kanji in the jouyou list?), and it stands for depression, melancholia. Some words using it include: 鬱病 (うつびょう) clinical depression 陰鬱 (いんうつ) gloom, melancholy 憂鬱 (ゆううつ) dejection, gloom, depression Most of the time when you see this kanji it will be read with the ...


6

This kanji is 「うつ」, and it should appear in the kanji conversion list on Mac when you enter these kana. One of the most common words it appears in is [鬱病]{うつ・びょう}, which is the word for "depression". Another is [憂鬱]{ゆう・うつ} which also means "depression", "gloom", or "melancholy". The former is (I believe) the medical term for depression, while the latter ...


6

It's 鬱, which is read as うつ. See this entry from Wiktionary for details. IMEs can easily convert うつ into 鬱, but don't worry, I don't remember how to write this kanji by hand. Although it's a 常用漢字 since 2010, it's too complicated :-) I believe many native speakers are like me. Actually, this character is famous as an example of insanely complicated kanji. ...


0

なの means what you say. This なの is used as question. なの can be used as both affirmative and question sentence. お is a polite prefix. For example, お家、お店、お弁当. In addition ご is also a polite prefix like ご飯、ご家族.


3

‘Fluent’ is translated as 流暢な and 淀みない as adjectives, 流暢に、淀みなく as adverbs, and ペラペラ and すらすら as onomatopoeias, like 彼は英語をペラペラ(流暢に)話す。 The word ‘native speaker’ passes as “ネイティヴ・スピーカー” in Japanese own pronunciation. It can be rephrased as ”外(国)人並み,” which is a very popular phrase. Most Japanese would roll their eyes if they hear "ボゴワシャ," unless you show it ...


7

I think you have a couple choices. For "fluent": ペラペラ。 This is a slightly colloquial word (due to being an onomatopoeia sounding like quick speech), which can mean "fluent", both in the sense of (a) speaking uninterruptedly, and by extension, (b) being skilled in the language. This might be the most common word you hear when describing someone as "fluent" ...


0

It might also help to see that そう is part of a "KSAD" set: こう - そう - ああ - どう Meaning: like this - like that ("close to you") - like that ("far away") - like what? This is just like: ここ - そこ - あそこ - どこ Meaning: here - there ("close to you") - there ("far away") - where? In these "KSAD" sets of meanings, English usually does not have words which neatly ...


3

This probably is 「二人で嵌【は】め合【あ】いしておかしいですね」. 嵌める is a transitive verb which means "to wear (gloves/ring/etc)", "to insert (something into a slot/groove/hole)", "to entrap/frame (someone)", etc. I have no idea what the two people are actually doing because the object is omitted and the context is lacking. 合う after the masu-form of another verb means "to do ...


3

The most used word that sounds 'あこ' is '吾子,' which is a very oldish expression meaning "my child" that appears pretty often in old anthologies like 万葉集. When you input 'ako' in MS Word, you get '亜子,' '阿子,' '阿古,' and '阿児' as a conversion. '亜子' is a pretty familiar name of women. But I don't know what the last two words mean, and if they make sense. アコ in ...


2

あこ as a Japanese girl name, can be displayed in a lot of different Kanji characters, depending on what the parents choose (They're all pronounced the same as AKO). For examples: 亜子、亜來、亜古、亜呼、亜心、亜湖、 亜琥、亜瑚、亜胡、亜香、亜恋 吾子ーー>(These two characters meaning "my child") 和心----> (could mean "harmonious heart") For those above beginning with Kanji "亜", which means ...


6

I would like to add a clarification to user4092's answer: In English, present tense verbs are changed to past tense in reported speech. "My mum said it was fun" would mean that she said she had fun as the activity was going on. If this is what you meant, then the Japanese sentence below is the answer: English direct speech: My mum said, "This is fun!" ...


1

No, you don't need it. But you should translate "my mom" to "(watashi-no) haha" and "it was fun" to "tanoshikatta", as a whole "(watashi-no) haha-wa tanoshikatta-to itta".


4

英語を公用語と考える means "to think of 英語 as 公用語".


1

In English, one can say "to take a room (in a hotel, at an inn, etc.)" The Japanese phrase 宿を取る is largely equivalent.


3

According to kotobank,「取る」 in 「宿を取る」 means "Occupy a place". ❽ 場所や時間を占める。 《取》  ① 場所を占める。場所を定めて落ち着く。 「宿を-・る」 「席を-・る」 「会議室を-・る」 「陣を-・る」


2

上に in this sentence means " in addition". Your sentence is translated as " In addition that She is extremely vulgar, is malicious more so than others."


2

The literal translation is 料理の話. I think クッキング will get through to Japanese people but テール as the word "tale" may not get through to them. As you found in your search, I think a lot of Japanese people may think テール is the word "しっぽ(tail)", or may not know テール.


1

I think テイル be considered. Here are some Japanese transliterations that use that to transliterate tale: Shark Tale Tales of Symphonia TaleSpin That said it seems both are in use. Wikipedia lists both フェアリーテール and フェアリーテイル as used to transliterate fairy tail and fairy tale.


1

わけではない is used when you're in a situation, or in regards to something that someone else has said, to indicate the belief that although something might seem to be the case, this may not hold true; however, it often can, depending on the context, be used by speakers to simply deny things in a less direct (euphemistic or roundabout) way to try to address the ...


4

As far as I'm aware, なくはない is a double negative with the meaning being something like, "it's not that (whatever was said) is not the case" with the implication "(whatever was said) may be true, but there is some issue with plainly stating 'yes.'" So I guess "not no" is a good way to think about it. I personally wouldn't have translated that as ...


6

It's a fixed phrase: 事に当たる 1 物事を担当する。従事する。「式典には全社をあげて―・った」 (Translation: take charge of / engage in some work: "The whole company was involved in the ceremony.") (The linked entry also has a second definition, but it's classical usage. Forget it.) ように that ends a sentence should be interpreted as formal command. From now on, you should ...


6

It would be either 飲酒禁止のイベント (if alcohol is explicitly prohibited) or お酒が出ないイベント (if "alcohol is not served" is all what you want to imply). I know it's not short, but "X-free" is often difficult to translate to Japanese. "Alcohol-free beer" is ノンアルコールビール, and "sugar-free gum" is 無糖ガム, シュガーフリーガム, 砂糖の入っていないガム, etc., by the way.


9

The word you're looking for is 体にいい (literally: good for your body in other words healthy healthful). 寿司は美味しいし体にもいいからかなり好きよ。 Sushi is delicious and it's even good for your health. I quite like it, you know. I would not vouch for the naturalness of my example sentence but that's the idea.


3

My nuance is as follows: いらなくなった服: used clothes [使]{つか}い[古]{ふる}し いらなかった服 : leftover clothes [余]{あま}り[物]{もの} いらない服   : unneeded clothes [不要品]{ふようひん}


3

いらなくなった has nuance that "I needed the clothes before but it became not needed now." I think いらなかった don't have the nuance like "I needed the clothes before.".



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