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0

The という意味...という意味ではありません part is contrasting what aizuchi are and aren't. So, it's saying [aizuchi] convey the sense of "yes, I'm following you", not the sense of "I agree with you". タイミングよく means "at the appropriate time". Because you can't see facial expressions, you might miss out on something. So, if you don't voice some kind of aizuchi, the person ...


1

I'll try to cover the triple-は part of the question. 俺はもう蕎麦屋には行かないから、千晶さんは安心して行っていいよ。 The basic structure here is Sentence 1 から Sentence 2. The first は marks the subject of the verb 行く 俺はもう行かない "I won't go any more" The third は marks the subject that applies to the verbs 安心して行く 千晶さんは安心して行っていいよ "You can go [there] freely." I ...


4

Here, "なんの” is an abbreviation for "なるの”. There are other cases where る is abbreviated as ん, like in "ここにいんの?” (for "ここにいるの?”). Since "気まずい" means something like "become embarrassed" or "feel awkward", you could translate that portion as: まあ、気まずくなんのだけはやめような Well, at least try not too feel so awkward Also, having multiple は's in a sentence is not ...


3

Japanese people often end sentences in this way in order to avoid giving a reason for decisions or actions. This is part of the indirect nature of the culture. Here's an example sentence: 普通{ふつう}は肉{にく}を食{た}べないのですが。。。 "Normally, I don't eat meat, but..." The real meaning of this sentence is "Normally, I don't eat meat, but this time, I will eat meat. I'm ...


2

I don't know if this sentence was obtained from a K-On! episode on purpose, but I wanted to provide some context. Since this sentence appears in the beginning of Episode 1, we can safely say that the conversation is between Nodoka and Yui, who are discussing how late it is already and yet Yui hasn't picked a school club: 和{のどか}: ...


4

ゆい is a girl's first name. Yui. って is a colloquial topic marker similar to は. It's the subject of a question here if you wanna read more about it. 振り返ってみると、ゆいって今まで何の部活もやってこなかったもんねー。 Looking back on it, Yui (or "you" if the listener is Yui) didn't do any after school clubs up until now, did she (you).


5

I'm assuming you have the most basic knowledge of particles like "wo"... ごはん (gohan) in such a context means "rice", not meal in general. The sentence (normally) means "Do Japanese dogs eat rice?", to which the answer is yes sometimes.


3

Sounds like he is saying 「ラッキー」 to me. Know nothing about the game but that is what my Japanese ear picks up. EDIT: Just found this: カプセルを取った時に ラッキー♪ ってドリラー君が言うんだけど RE-EDIT: Found these, too. Go to paragraph (about) #9, which starts with "It's a shame": It’s a shame, then, that the in-game voices are a bit grating. The voice actors ...


3

Noun-A + のような + Noun-B = Noun-B like Noun-A みぞれは雨のような雪です Sleet is snow (which is) like rain. Another example: 山田さんのような人を見ました I saw a man (Who looked) like Yamada.


1

「どの」=「いずれの」 = "each and every (one of the items mentioned)" 「どの + Noun + も + Verb or Adjective Phrase」 = "Every (noun) [that have been mentioned] is/does ~~~." This 「も」 does not mean "also". It expresses the complete kind of affirmation or negation. In other words, it is saying that there is no exception (to what one is saying). ...


0

どの+noun+も+positive predicate = every noun ... どの+noun+も+negative predicate = no noun ... So in this case: Every/each festival is of a grand scale.


2

私が困っているのが発音ですね can be translated as “What I’m troubled with is pronunciation,” in short, “My problem (weak point) is pronunciation.” You can replace “のが” with “のは” to mean “What I’m troubled / My problem is.” は and が is a postpositional particle to link the subject, 私が困っている - What I'm troubled with to predicate, 発音です. のが(のは)can be used for examples: ...


3

私が困っているのは is translated " what I am worrying about is" and this "の" is used in a nominalization of a sentence and verbs and so on. For example, "私が勉強しているのは、大学に行くためです"、"走るのが嫌いです"、"悲しいのが嫌です". And 私が困る of this sentence is that わたし is subject and 困る is predicate, so が is used because に isn't set behind a subject. In addition, if you want to use "に", you say ...


2

I've heard ''前置詞の目的語''. It means the partner of the prepositional, not a role in a sentence. ''前置詞の目的語'' can be used even when the prepositional phrase is not regarded as a kind of the object in the sentence. I'm waiting for her. I made a cake for my children with her. I'm interesting in ethnic food. These words in italics are all ''前置詞の目的語''. ...


2

It’s hard for me to translate 案外役に立つ事がコロッと転がってたりする into Japanese, but I take it in the meaning of “You’ll find something lying before you just casually, which turns out to be helpful to you later in an unexpected way. コロッと is a colloquial variation of コロリと. コロリ is an onomatopoeia or ideo-phone to describe the status of something / someone dropping, falling, ...


3

This コロッと isn't really describing the quality of the thing itself, I mean, it is, but much more reflecting the speaker's impression or observation. In your example, 転がっている alone can fully depict the situation, "it's lying on the ground". The remainder, コロッと and ~たりする both represent the speaker's mood. コロッと implies (of course not round or rolling-ness here) ...


3

That 「と」 must be written in hiragana because it is a particle. You have no choice here. The 「と」 turns the preceding word 「コロッ」 into an adverb form so that it can modify the verb phrase 「[転]{ころ}がってたりする」. 「ころっ/コロッ」 is a colloquial and onomatopoeic "word"; therefore, it is not very important whether you write it in hiragana or katakana. You have a choice ...


3

「[声]{こえ}をそろえる」 in this context, means: "to say (basically) the same thing about something as others have previously said about it" or in short, "to express a similar opinion" In other situations such as multiple people singing or saying the same thing together , 「声をそろえる」 means: "to sing in unison" or "to speak in one voice" respectively. ...


1

It means: to speak in unison (with one voice). A synonym is 声を合わせる. EDIT: I think that what you said in your first comment seems to apply here. Hiroshi agrees with oneechan. Hiroshi made his opinion merge with oneechan's opinion when he says 「そうだぞ。。...」.


3

「[最近]{さいきん}よくじわ[怖]{こわ}スレ[見]{み}てるからビビりになってる。」 This must be a tough one for someone teaching himself Japanese as it is studded with slang. 「じわ」: Short for the onomatopoeia 「じわじわ」 = "gradually", "slowly", etc. 「怖」: Short for 「怖い」= "scary" 「スレ」: Short for 「スレッド」 = "thread (in an internet forum)" So, 「じわ怖スレ」 means "threads that make you feel scared ...


-1

"Your wishes/desires are beyond what anyone would imagine, lol" ...is my interpretation. Or to put in another way "I can't imagine wanting to be a fly, lol" 想像 (imaginations) はるかに上回る (far exceed) 願望 (wish/desire) 笑 (lol) The only part in the response that refers to the original context is the 願望 (of the original writer). Everything else corresponds to ...


0

Also 行ったら満足しますか? Would I be satisfied if I go?


1

Maybe it would help if you share what you need this for. If it's to convey to someone you want to purchase a toilet with both flush types "二重流し水洗トイレ" or 大小切り替えタイプ will get the message across. I'm sure any japanese person will figure out you want a toilet with both flush patterns. If it was me I would say "大・小水洗付きトイレ" (read ”だい・しょう・すいせんつきトイレ”)


5

In reality, this is not a very common topic of conversation in Japan because, as you so stated, the dual flush is just the norm here. Every time I see/hear the system mentioned, it is mentioned by a non-Japanese person who has visited Japan. If, however, you need a term for a possible future discussion on the topic with a Japanese-speaker, you might use ...


0

There might be somewhat of a semantic gap, most people won't ever need to use the word, discussion about toilet models would much more concerned about washlets, rather than dual flush. It seems however that the correct form would be "デュアル水洗式トイレ" rather than "デュアル水洗トイレ" that mostly Chinese sites use, specifically with regard to this ...


1

Unfortunately, 「[何]{なん}で」 does not mean "why" here. Thinking that it does would make one go crazy over this line. 「[自分]{じぶん}とは[何]{なん}でどこへ[向]{む}かうべきか」= 「自分とは何で、どこへ向かうべきか」= 「自分とは何であり、(そして)どこへ向かうべきか」 (あり=あって) 「何」 means "what". "Who" might fit better in the context, though. 「とは」 is an emphatic topic marker. 「か」 is a question marker. Why am ...


6

This is the [命令形]{めい・れい・けい} - imperative form. It translates more like O dream boat, go/move on to the shore of tomorrow Which is almost what you have. The difference is that the singer is addressing the boat (夢の船よ), not saying "go on" the boat.


3

In some contexts, such as your sample above, toko is an abbreviation of tokoro, "place".


1

The word おく in しておく works to add a nuance "for a period of time." 楽しみにしています。 楽しみにしてます。 楽しみにしてる。 楽しみです。 楽しみ。 These five expressions all mean "I'm excited about it", "I can't wait" or something like that. These are expressing the present feeling. The following expressions fundamentally mean the same feeling as those above, but also ...


5

If I take the part in bold letters in such a way as “She doesn’t show any interest in my addressing to her. So I got eager to let her quickly respond to me next time, and another next time.” — sorry for my poor English translation. お世辞にも楽しんでいた、と説明するのは憚られるぐらい can be translated as “It can by no means suggest that she was enjoying my call / solicitation. ...


2

This is no easy question without knowing the exact context or situation in which to use either of the two expressions. So, I will begin with the part of your question that I could answer with complete confidence. No, 「楽しみにしとく」 does not mean "I enjoy myself in advance about it." regardless of the context or situation. Both 「楽しみにしている」 and 「 楽しみにしておく」 are ...


1

My dictionary say "しておく" means "ある目的のためにあらかじめある行為を行なうこと(an action for a purpose in advance). For example, 今日、明日のテストのために英語の勉強をしておく( I study English today for tomorrow exam.) I think 楽しみにしておく is a little more friendly and companionable saying than 楽しみにしている but they are almost same meaning.


6

This is parsed as 作ろう + とする. 作ろう is the volitional form of 作る. When this form is combined with とする, it gives a meaning of try to do. The -ている makes it present progressive. 作ろうとしている = To be trying to create


2

This is a way of saying "X is most important". For example: 戦士は目が命 投手は肩が命 I don't think it's very common but it's a nice way of saying that X is invaluable for Y. Check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sch9SXBaD7k She says: 「芸能人は歯が命」


2

As stated above 耳をすます is an idiom that means 'to listen carefully'. If we translate literally there is a kanji for 'ears' - '耳' and a verb 'すます' which means - 'to clear' - so if we combine these it's - 'to clear ears' which is the same as 'to listen carefully'. As for translation of 耳をすませば, it seems that すませば is a form of a verb to include 'if'. So I would ...


1

In this sentence, you could replace それなりに with そこそこ and だと with だそう with little meaning changes. それなりに is being used here as an intensifier. It depends a lot on context and speaker, but in this case it'd probably be somewhere in between とても and ある程度. In English, perhaps "quite or "somewhat" would be close approximations. だと can be thought of just an ...


1

と On the contrary, your following section is super important, so that I can know the と isn't at the end of the sentence but qualifies the next verb. The whole clause before と is supposed to go to a verb phrase 買いかぶっていた "had been overrated", which is separated into two parts 買いかぶり + していた during the insertion of など, making the original form obscured. After ...


3

It is possible if the individual/character answering is: male(most likely), stoic, non-talkative, old-fashion (think samurai-stereotype of old) answering a 'thank you' from someone. (Most novels I read with characters answering like this would fit this description). Might be more of a うむ~ but it could be むー depending on the writer or character.


2

Definitely a mistake. The only time I hear of むー is in comics where it's the sound effect for thinking (I think you use hmmm in English). So, my theory is this person heard a conversation like... Akimori: I did your laundry for you. Yamada: Hmmm...but I thought I asked Ken to do it. And might have thought むー was "you're welcome" when it was just the ...


1

There is a special word for reuniting: 再会(さいかい). I believe when using this word some significant amount of time should or will be anticipated to have passed in-between meetings. So, if you don't expect to see them in the immediate future you could say: 「〇〇さんとの再会が待ち遠しいです」Where 〇〇さん is their name.


2

お会いできる日を楽しみにしています is the same with "I'm looking forward to seeing you again," and is polite as well as appropriate as a closing of a letter. You can also add 'また (again)' or 'また[近々]{ちかぢか}(soon again)' to お会いできる日を楽しみにしています so that you may convey your desire to meet the receiver keenly.


5

お会いできる日を楽しみにしています is indeed a very common expression with many variants, e.g. お会いするのを楽しみにしています, お会いしたい, etc. Even in English I would say something like "It'd be nice to be able to meet you again" for a second meeting. In fact, in the BCCWJ (Japanese corpus) more than 10% of the occurrences of お会い use また before it (as in またお会いしましょう or またいつかお会いできるといいね etc.): ...


0

You translation is correct, and I believe the same phrase can be used in either situation. However, I was taught to use はじめまして when meeting someone for the first time.


10

As shown in @choco's comment above, 「[国]{くに}」 in this context means "one's birthplace", "home province", etc. It is mostly used when one is staying far away from where one was born and raised but is still in the same country/nation. When I am in another prefecture, I am sometimes asked 「国はどこ?」,「お国はどちらですか。」, etc. to which I reply 「[名古屋]{なごや}です」. So, ...


-1

In that context, it means "That being said". There was probably some other statement before, like maybe: I am going on a no-chocolate diet. "THAT BEING SAID", there are 18 pieces of chocolate in front of me.



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