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1

The Crimson "month of flowers". Or Crimson March.


8

According to a dictionary, 花つ月 is an alternative name for March, the third month of the year in the traditional Japanese calendar. (I didn't know that.) So 緋色の花つ月 means March in Crimson or something like that.


2

The sentence in question basically says that the soul is like liquid, and must be always inside some kind of container. A magician can't drain soul from someone and keep it on its own. You seem to have failed to translate the verb 留まる (=stay, reside) at the last. The basic structure of the sentence is "魂はあくまで~に留まる" (The soul absolutely stays in ~). And the ...


7

「め」 is a suffix of contempt when attached to a noun or another person's name. 「この[犬]{いぬ}め!」= "You stupid dog!" 「[許]{ゆる}せん、[田中]{たなか}め!」= "Will never forgive Tanaka the bastard!" Translation is an art. You could use whatever word you feel appropriate for the context that expresses contempt, scorn, disdain, etc. Note that it is a suffix of humility when ...


4

It's contracted with the particle は: オレたち+は → オレたちゃ


1

Your translation shows your complete understanding of the phrase even if you do not like it yourself. A difficulty this relative clause could present for the translator is the fact that 「霞む」 is an intransitive verb and that is not the action either performed by or against 「打突」, the main noun of the relative clause. What I often do in such cases is that I ...


1

In this sentence, I think the author suggests valuing one important thing, life. Not two things (life and self) separately. So I would say this 読点 (comma) servers as an appositive marker. That is to say, 一回限りの人生 and かけがえのない自己 are the same idea described in two different ways. To translate this literally, you can use comma as well in English: Let's ...


0

You can interpret it as …人生 and …自己 as you suggest, but it's more like a noun used like an adverb like 一生(いっしょう)i.e. "during your life". …に or には don't make sense along with the predicate 大切にしよう. Though 人生に一度は大切にしよう means "let's take care of it at least once in your life". Basically に ≠ in.


1

This isn't literal but it seems natural: 妹の誕生日に人形をあげました。


3

Don't treat 「とは」 as a single unit. 「〜と違う」 means "different from". This 「と」 is the one normally glossed as "with", although I can't think of a way to use that gloss here. When 「〜と違う」 is used in the outermost layer of the sentence, it is normally becomes 「〜とは違う」. While I can't give a technical explanation of why this is the case, I'd say the hand-wavey one ...


0

To say 「誕生日に」>「誕生日は」 in OP's context is very Japanese-as-a-foreign-language-esque. There is absolutely nothing wrong or unnatural in saying 「誕生日は」. In fact, 「は」 would be a very natural choice among native speakers. To attach 「は」, the word does not have to be the grammatical subject of the sentence.


1

As @Eric mentioned, に is the correct choice, and there is no harm in having two of them in this sentence. In addition to that, you could use には to emphasize that it was specifically for her birthday instead of some other occasion. 誕生日には妹に人形をあげました。 → For her birthday, I gave my little sister a doll. Note that you can also use [贈]{おく}る for giving a ...


1

There is no problem having two に particles in one sentence. Your original choice is most correct. Using [event]+に is the best way to express that something will happen for [event], and [person]+にあげる happens to also be the best way to express that you are giving something to [person]. 誕生日{たんじょうび}に妹{いもうと}に人形{にんぎょう}をあげました。


2

Here, とは is just pointing out that we're defining a characteristic of the N700 group. (The と is the quotative particle, but I don't think that really helps in parsing this.) どこが違う? is not asking for a definition per se, but for defining a characteristic. Your translation is pretty close. Literally, I'd translate it as something like: Where is the ...


5

Yes, (私は)あなたのもの is a common phrase, and it's repeated more then a hundred times in lyrics. You can also use other first- and second-person pronouns, for example 僕は君のもの. Of course this can be one of the heaviest expressions to show your love, but it's up to you. And it's best to leave it in hiragana, just as suggested by OP. BCCWJ corpus returned 57 results ...


0

For step one, let us try and reconstruct the actual text, before trying to understand it: Near as I can tell, between my own experience, help from a Chinese co-worker, and a bit of guesswork, my first pass at the text is: 日本東都住 晴風斉鋳? The last character might not be a character at all, but some kind of seal, it really is hard to tell. The specific ...


4

Ordinary, ingredient list looks like: スパム、ベーコン、ソーセージ、卵、ハム No 。is used, because the list is not a sentence. For Spam on bread with sausages, bacon, and ham. It should look like: スパムの乗ったパン、ソーセージ、ベーコン、ハム Also I suggest to use ランチョンミート for spam, because スパム is not common for Japanese. So last example should be: ランチョンミートの乗ったパン、ソーセージ、ベーコン、ハム


4

What foregin word is マスカット derived from? As already pointed out in the comment section, the word is derived from "muscat", a type of grape. What is the most commonly used word in Japanese for green grape? The usual word for "green grape" (precisely in this generality) is 白ブドウ. Is マスカット an accurate translation for green grape? In Japan, マスカット ...


-1

私はあなたの物です。 You can also use "もの" but the kanji helps to keep things cleaner. As you have it in the original question, it just reads "your stuff." もの does literally mean "thing/stuff," etc., but it's used in various situations. Like most Japanese words, context and sentence structure are important. For example, you can say: おいしいものが食べたい。 Eng: "I want to ...


5

That's her personal preference, and the only way to reach the "correct" answer is to ask herself why. Generally speaking, there are many people, especially 芸能人, who want nonstandard transliterated names, and people have the liberty to do that. This typically happens when people want names which also sound natural to the ear of Westerners. For example ...


0

As you mentioned, ほど roughly translates to "as much as" or to the level of". So it can be used to compare you to a friend, but is used more commonly in the negative sense in order to be humble and modest. For example: A: わぁ、日本語が上手ですよ。 Wow, you're really good at Japanese. B: スミスさんほど上手じゃないんだけど。But I'm not as good as Smith is./I'm not at Smith's level. In ...


2

In this case, こういう兵法 means 変移抜刀落水. Another but same meaning, こういう手もありなんじゃないか。 こういうやり方もありなんじゃないか。 But you should be aware. This conversation about '武道'. Therefore you can use '兵法'. If things are not relevant with 武道, using '兵法' is wrong.


3

「ジェネギャ」 is as @marasai stated in the comments above. I had to google around, however, to find out what 「ジェネギャな」 means as an adjective as no one around me uses it. Fortunately, I was able to find enough example usages to conclude that: 「ジェネギャな」 is synonymous to 「[時代遅]{じだいおく}れな」. Thus, 「ジェネギャなジョーク」 should mean "outdated or old-fashioned kind of ...


2

marasai wrote in a comment: ジェネギャ is probably an abbreviation for ジェネレーション・ギャップ (generation gap).


2

Yes, there are a couple nuances for かわいそう but basically you have it. Sometimes it can be softer like: "Aww, that's too bad for Makoto!". So, it can be used in more serious context like "I feel pitiful for that person" or like I used previously, it can be more casual and light. You'll also see it used by itself. I.e. "かわいそうに!" This can mean "I feel bad ...


5

The artist's name is Mitsuo Banba (番場 三雄). The title of the painting is ヤルンツァンポ渡る "Crossing the Yarlung Tsangpo". Yarlung Tsangpo is the part of the Brahmaputra River that flows through Tibet.


2

「万寿一」 should be a given name if it was placed behind a surname. It would be read 「ますいち」 and the characters mean literally "10,000 - felicitations - one". It is not a regular word, so it does not really have a clear meaning. Regarding the reading, it may actually turn out to be totally different. That is because the Japanese civil laws allow kanji used ...


5

First, permit me to point out a couple of words that you seem to be reading incorrectly. 大きな潤のある眼で、 in the big and wet eye 「で」 ≠ "in" This 「で」 is an auxiliary verb, not a location particle. More precisely, 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. (As you are already reading novels, I assume that you are familiar with the ...


3

Google Translate is not that far off in this case. だんさ (段差) means a "step" or "a difference in level". So it's saying something like "Hey, the road is uneven!"


5

みちに だんさが ある just means "there is a step in the road", where だんさ means "step" as in "difference in height" and not "stair". だろう (だろ is a colloquial spelling) is the colloquial variant of でしょう, which when used in questions usually can be translated with ", right?", as in みちに だんさが ある だろう? There is a step in the road, right? But as an exclamation ...


4

The intransitive verb 届く (to reach) and the transitive verb 届ける (to convey, to deliver) are usually used with tangible objects such as letters. But it's also frequently used with words representing feelings. 感謝の気持ちを届ける convey the feelings of gratitude 君に届け Let (It) Reach You The second example is the title of a manga, and people can easily ...


5

起きた happened 起きたこと what happened 起きたことを表す言葉 a word that describes what happened ある所で起きたことを、地名とともに象徴的に表す言葉がある。 There is a word that, along with a place name, symbolically describes what happened there.


0

そう言えば 確認というか念を押しとくが "Now that [you] mention it/that, To confirm or should I say, stamp out [my] concern.." The form A というか B is very common. It means, roughly "A, or that is to say, B" という is very important, it is a construction that "colloquially quotes" the preceding text. Adding か adds a sense of questioning or variability. It's like a verbal ...


0

"and by the way, to confirm or should I say make extra sure"


2

It is, to make sure of something or to confirm with no doubt 刑事は、最後にこう言った。もう一度、確認というか念を押しておきたいのですが、あなたは、事件のあった当日は、勤務先を、午後5時半ごろに、退社したのですね? The detective said. 'I want to make sure that you left your employer's office at 5:30pm that day. Is that correct?'


1

Depending on the situation, you can use 認定資格. Perhaps for a private certification, this is more appropriate. (A related term to keep in mind is 認証. But it has a different nuance so does not apply in this situation, necessarily.) E.g. 「AdWords 認定資格」 is a Google-certified accreditation (Google Partners page) 「オートデスク認定資格」 is a Autodesk-certified ...


0

It depends on who issued his/her title and how widely recognized its title. There is difference XX公認YY and 公認YY. Later one has no limitation. So who issued and how widely recognized are serious question. For example, This game is WBA title match. このゲームは、WBA公認タイトルマッチです。 Regarding GARP, you can say ファイナンシャル・リスク・マネージャー  USファイナンシャル・リスク・マネージャー  ...


0

Yo let's be polite! When talking about someone else's father you want to use お父さん. Your own pops is your Chichi 父. The letter written to Paul's father = Paul (no) Otousan (ni) kaita tegami "Send it to me please" = [it] (wo) 「watashi (ni) okutte kudasai」 Say all that to Paul = (to) Paul-san (ni) tsutaete kudasai. パオルさんの お父さんに 書いた手紙を 私に 送ってくださいと ...


1

You're talking about right after take-off of an airplane. "The landing gear is (now) up."


2

This is sort of ambiguous but it is referring to the landing gear retracting into the plane.


6

それでもあり: that'll be fine too ちゅーか: contracted ていうか, which is a colloquial expression meaning "or rather". あり: fine じゃないですか?: isn't it? Saying それでも implies there is other ideal options, and 婿 is not the best (See this answer about でいい and でもいい). 作家さん first said それでもあり, implying 婿 is a possible alternative which may be selected reluctantly. Then he ...


2

Sometimes people shorten 「ていうか」with 「ちゅうーか」, your translation looks pretty correct to me :).


3

At phrase level, 頑張る is usually an intransitive verb which means "to work hard", "to do one's best", etc. (EDIT: You can say テニスを頑張る, too) It never means 応援する, which is the most common transitive verb that means "to cheer (someone) up". The interpretation of the sentence purely depends on the context. If you're certain that it's not the girl but Makoto who ...


1

As a Japanese-speaker (if that means anything), I could only interpret the "sentence" one way and that is your way. Admittedly, you have only provided a minimal amount of context, but even so, I could not understand how the other person arrived at his/her translation. The line would not be a natural-sounding one to express what s/he thinks it means. ...


1

I can see your interpretation - Makoto did his best & now the tide has turned. Makes sense... The question seems to be who exactly the friend is referring to as having 頑張った, and what activity involved the 頑張ってing (sure, that's a word ;)) Since the friend is looking/directing the frowning thought at the girl now suddenly cheering for Arata, it would ...


2

I would translate it as FEDの方がもったりしていたり使い心地もずっとゴリ‌​ゴリの荒いものだったりする the FED has a much rougher feel to it ゴリゴリ and 荒い are somewhat synonymous and together with もったり convey something like "rough, heavy-duty, clumsy, tough". Note that it doesn't say the camera is actually more sturdy, but that it feels like one that is.


3

ツ ≠ シ ツ ≒ つ and シ ≒ し. 「スーシ」 is how many non-Japanese people pronounce 「すし」. Jokes aside, the word you saw would probably be 「スーツ」 instead of 「スーシ」. 「スーツ」 means a "suit", the clothes. 「スーシ」 does not exist.   「おニュー」 is a comical way to say "brand-new" or just "new". 「お」 is the honorific prefix for politeness. This is a very exceptional usage of 「お」. ...


2

「それこそ ハイエロファントグリーンを[使]{つか}えば[苦痛]{くつう}を[感]{かん}じる[間]{ま}もあたえず[一瞬]{いっしゅん}のうちに。」 To add punctuations for better (hopefully) understanding. 「それこそ、ハイエロファントグリーンを使えば、苦痛を感じる間もあたえず、一瞬のうちに。」 The most important point for a Japanese-learner would be to notice that a whole verb phrase is left unmentioned at the end of the sentence. From the way you worded your ...


2

Yes, it does and your translation is spot-on. (This type of question can also be asked in chat.)


8

Ironically, after starting to read ebooks I actually developed the habit of browsing for books in a real book store. I guess I might be an exception, though. This is my (loose) translation. (Since you haven't (yet) provided any other explanation of where you're having problems understanding the sentence, I don't know where to break down the sentence ...



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