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4

I can see that font being hard to read if you don't understand everything yet. That is not 「扎し」 but 「れし」part of 「呼ばれし」, "to be called". 「かつて」 can be translated to "ex-", but it also means "once" or "long ago", for cases where someone is praising another or when talking about a title that doesn't necessarily have an "ex-" or is actually still continuing ...


2

<1> Yes, いず does not sound natural in this context. <2> 立ってはおらず has the same meaning as 立ってはいるのではなくて <3> It does sound more formal, but the nuance does not really change. I would loosly translate it like this: It's not that you are alone; a sense of self-awareness first comes from being surrounded by others.


3

えぐり is the 連用形 (continuative form) of えぐる, which means "to hollow out", "to gouge" えぐり + 込む is a 複合動詞 (compound verb). The second verb (後項動詞) in a compound usually loses its original meaning. A small list of such verbs can be found in this fluentu article. 込む alone can be translated as "to be crowded", whereas this meaning is lost here and it's more ...


3

First, "to introduce myself to X" is "Xに自己紹介する", not "Xと自己紹介する". "家を出かけた" is a bit strange, too, and you should say either "家を出た" or "出かけた" (without 家を). ある男に自己紹介するために… This is the natural choice, because you probably know who you're going to meet, and at least his name. ある男 here means "a (certain) man". This phrase is fine in a novel, but if this is ...


5

This is an ending theme from anime 怪傑ゾロリ and ゾロリ's mama has already been dead for years when the story begins so... The の is #❷-1 on goo辞書: [終助]活用語の連体形に付く。 1 (下降調のイントネーションを伴って)断定の言い方を和らげる意を表す。多く、女性が使用する。 It's a sentence-ending particle. (With a falling tone) You use it to soften an assertive statement. It's more used by women. So ゾロリ's late ...


3

This [verb] + ではないか is an exclamatory phrase which denotes the speaker's surprise or accusation. [*]電車は反対方向に走り始めたではない。 (Ungrammatical) 電車は反対方向に走り始めたではないか。 (To my surprise,) The train started to run in the opposite direction! 電車は反対方向に走り始めたのではない。 It is not that the train started to run in the opposite direction. 電車は反対方向に走り始めたのではないか。 (I ...


-1

1) There are days where we are together. 紡いだ I think of as weaving the fabric of the day by being together. 2) 本当はいつも means In truth, there has always.... Note the has is because the sentence is overall past tense. So it means overall like: In truth, there has always been a certain someone there, regardless of the situation I was in 3) いくつも as ...


0

Here's the full version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFnlveT-v3c. It has some random subtitles (I think they're comments on the video) You should probably say be by your side instead of be on your side. That said I think the の means more like definition 4 in Wiktionary. This is pretty good. I would maybe say think of me instead of will remember me ...


2

と here means when. It's a conditional (A と B), where B naturally follows from A. See this post. The sentence as a whole reads like: Because of this, it will be safe when you hide under a desk like you would during an earthquake.


11

First of all, forget that fansub. It's totally wrong (unless you've misheard the woman's line), and 通い詰めることになりそう has nothing to do with any idiomatic expression. Translating ことになる as 'It is decided that ...' is one of the possibilities. In this case, it's the matter of her prediction rather than the decision of someone else, and phrases like 'cannot help ...


0

Edited: go look at naruto's answer. He's got a lot more experience to answer this (its my first time on this site, down voters pls no harass). Usually, ことになる roughly means "to become thing," where "thing" is usually modified by some phrase. According to Denshi Jisho, 通い詰める means "to visit frequently." In this context, 通い詰める is modifying こと (thing, matter) ...


-1

I believe this is the past conditional with -ている. Here are two good resources that will allow you to understand this grammar form and anything similar to it: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/teform http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/conditionals Friendly Ghost described the deconstruction of the meaning very well in his answer. In ...


2

間違っていたら、修正してください。 間違う means "to make a mistake" 間違って is the て form of 間違う 間違っている means "are/is making a mistake" 間違っていた is the た form of 間違っている and means "were/was making a mistake" 間違っていたら means "if I was making a mistake"


4

It is internet slang that is used to indicate that the rest of the sentence has been omitted for one reason or another, usually to some comedic effect. The answer is explained in detail on this site: http://imimatome.com/netyogonoimi/ry.html If the site is forbidden, try viewing a cached version. 最後までハッキリと言わない時に使う、謙虚なネット用語です(違 ...


3

From my experience living in Japan for 19+ years, I would translate this more as disbelief: "wait, you couldn't have thought that...". Also, have a look at various translations on alc.co.jp, if you haven't already: http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=%E3%81%BE%E3%81%95%E3%81%8B&ref=sa. You'll notice they tend to align more with disbelief than surprise


5

As I'm neither an artist nor a native English speaker, please take them as purely grammatical advice rather than the recommended translation. どこか遠くへ行きたい 電波もないどこかへ I want to go towards somewhere far away Somewhere where even no radio waves reach I wasn't sure "there aren’t even radio waves" has the same connotation, but 電波 in Japanese is often used ...


2

That's the first character in the well-known Mandarin Chinese greeting "nĭ hăo" (你好). 你 means "you." I don't remember ever seeing it in a Japanese context, and jisho.org returns no words containing it. Edit: tried searching *你, and got one result - 玫瑰玫瑰我愛你, which is a Chinese song from the 1940's which means "Rose, Rose, I love you." *你* also has no ...


3

It essentially means How convenient!. It's a short form for いいところに来たね. The literal meaning is Ah, you came to an opportune occasion.


1

家庭 usually refers to the smallest social unit, typically made up of parents and their children who live together. This word on its own never refers to a larger group of families. This question (入ってみたい家庭は?) sounds like a very casual what-if question to me, and translating this as "entering XX clan/lineage" is probably too grandiose, even when 一族 plays an ...


2

"How have you been" is not a past tense either, it's called "present perfect". As well as the English translation, the original sentence is referring to the present state that is a consequence of the event (その as in その後). That's why it's not a past tense. As for how to response to it, I'd recommend おかげさまで 元気です. When you somehow don't want to reply ...


0

It's more like "considering". If you're thinking of the difference between 思う and 考える, 思う could be equated to "believe" or "feel that it is so", where as 考える is more like "pondering over". There's a little bit of overlap in some situations, but that's a good base way to look at it until you see how it's used situationally a decent number of times. edit: I ...


7

Think about it like this: ピアニストです。 'is a pianist'    歌手です。 'is a singer' To negate this, we'll want to split です up into で+あります: ピアニストで あります。 'is a pianist'    歌手で あります。 'is a singer' Now we can negate あります and insert は to go with the negation: ピアニストでは ありません。 'is not a pianist'    歌手では ありません。 'is not a singer' To put these both ...


4

暮れる alone can mean 'a day ends' or 'the sun sets' but 日 usually accompanies it. I don't think '日が' have any implications here. 暮れる actually means 'a day, a month, a season or a year ends'. We say '今年も暮れますね' in December.


3

"山を登ったり、降りたり、よく考えた。" is an unnatural sentence. If it's something like 山を登ったり、降りたり、よく遊んだ, you can interpret that the concrete actions of playing include climbing or descending a mountain. Or, if it's 山を登ったり、降りたり、よく考えたりした, it means that you did many things including climbing and descending a mountain or thinking profoundly. "山を登ってって、降りてって、よく考えた。" is a ...


5

The original: 「ところが、そうした人々が、神社や寺院の建物の前に立って祈願をこらす時、その対象である神仏について、それがいかなる神であり仏であるかを問われて、適切な答えをすることができるかといえばそうではない。」 Your TL: "However, when these people stand before the shrine or temple buildings and offer prayers, they enquire about the various deities enshrined there and consider whether or not they will be able to give an appropriate answer to ...


4

In this context, it would make little to no sense if 「かれ(が)」 were not said. B-さん is saying that if it were C-さん(← かれ) who says that he saw the kids studying, it would be a highly trustworthy source of information. It is almost like saying "if the information came from C-さん of all people". In other words, the fact that the witness is C-さん this time is ...


3

常に: tsune ni, 'always' 思念: shinen, 'to think deeply', in this context 工夫: kufū, 'to seek for the better', 'to try to come up with a new idea', 'to exercise ingenuity', etc. せよ: seyo, 'Do' (archaic imperative form of する) So this short sentence just says "Keep on thinking, and seek a new way". The translation in the English Wikipedia article has several ...


3

生き生きと + 描く・描き出す would work. In place of 生き生きと you could use 鮮やかに, 人物像を見事に, etc., as well.


3

I would recommend 「サーモンの手巻{てま}き」 or 「鮭{さけ}の手巻き」. The 「の」 can be dropped but it would sound a little nicer if you insert it. If you want a phrase for ordering, 「サーモンを手巻きで!」 would also be natural. Yes, you can end that with a 「で」. (「で」 is an extremely useful particle at eateries, but I will not get into that here.) Depending on the sushi shop, the staff ...


4

命を吹き込む is what I have heard the most.



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