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-1

I would say "まぁ、人のやることですから" which expresses the idea very well. The nuance is very close to "Well, we are all only humans."


0

「する」is a generic verb. It's like "do" or "execute". Your second sentence is like saying "I do go to Japan". As you probably already know, if the speaker just want to tell the plan, the speaker says 「私は日本へ行きます。」. If I hear someone says 「私は日本へ行くことにします。」, I feel that the speaker want to tell listener(s) that he/she gave thoughts on something before saying it. ...


1

Your translation looks OK. "there's been some vagueness as to whether person A and B's relationship is romantic or not..." Even though Person B's line is only 「ああ・・」, I would think he is a man. A woman would rarely, if ever, say that as a reply to a statement. "so for a moment I wavered on whether the sentence meant marriage or all romantic matters ...


6

I tried my hand at a free translation, because I couldn't figure out how to translate it preserving the meaning or sentence structure precisely: Utter nonsense. The crime of allowing even one fool who has gone against honor and loyalty at the black round table, no matter how low they might be, is nonetheless a crime. And so, there must be punishment. ...


3

A) [君達]{きみたち}は[軍]{ぐん}の[命令]{めいれい}で[善悪]{ぜんあく}の[区別]{くべつ}もつかなくなってしまったのか! Your TL: "Can’t you even tell right from wrong if the army doesn’t order you to?!" If it is an attempt at a free translation, yours looks "okay". It is difficult to comment on a free translation. One could not, however, tell if you understood the sentence structure from your TL. ...


1

Maybe something like: As deputy in his absence, one cannot question the tearing of limb from limb for the ignorance of defiling the house of the Lord. 主{ぬし} (おも, あるじ) bears the meaning of "lord", "chief", "master" and similar. 主 is also used to reference "the Lord" in Christian writings, such as the Bible, e.g. Colossians 3-23 and コロサイ 3:23-24. Given ...


9

(Sorry to post this as a separate answer, but this was too long for a comment) "Nobody is perfect" or "There is no such thing as a perfect person" can be almost literally translated as: 完璧な人はいない。 完璧な人などいない。 人間は完璧ではない。 I believe this is completely natural, and you can confirm this in ALC and Weblio辞書. There is a movie with exactly the same ...


9

To affect that meaning, my favourites are: 河童{かっぱ}の川流れ{かわながれ}。 河童も溺{おぼ}れる。{much less common than #1) 猿{さる}も木{き}から落{お}ちる。 either will get you a smile from the listener.


7

完璧な人間などいない。 完璧な人なんていないよ。 完璧な人間なんかいないさ。 etc, etc. 完璧 is better than 完全 here. Adding something like など/なんて/なんか for emphasis sounds natural. 人 and 人間 are pretty much interchangeable here.


3

This is a form used to express a wish. Like in English "I wish that this will turn out to be a dream", or "I wish you good health". You convert the plain sentence expressing what you wish into formal language and add 〜ように at the end. For example, if you want to wish somebody to have a great day. You may want to use the sentence: ...


3

予定が済む means something like "the agenda is clear", where "clear" is intransitive, here. 済ませる is indeed the causative form of 済む (and is transitive). So 済ませる is something like "to finish" (compare the (transitive) "to clear"). ~ようとする is maybe "to try to ...". The main point, however, is that 楽{らく} doesn't really mean "fun", but "comfortable/easy". The ...


2

It seems to be 汗のない社会は堕落だ, which is a variation on 「愛なき人生は暗黒なり。汗なき社会は堕落なり。」Google tells me this is a quote from 前田又兵衛. Something like "A life without love is darkness. A society without effort is corruption."


2

I could extract something out of those sentences, but it looks to me like you searched word for word (or used an online translation tool). The topic marker is indeed pronounced "wa", but the hiragana is は. 私は, not 私わ 光の島住まう needs a に to indicate location. Also the verb is a bit odd maybe. I would have said 住んでいる instead. Honestly, the second sentence is ...


3

Yi (and other characters) existed in Japanese a long time ago and I found an old katakana sheet that has the missing characters. This image is from 1873: More on this at this Japanese wikipedia page for: ヤ行イ. Also, note that this page has the respective hiragana characters too. In reality, most native Japanese will not be able to read the "classical yi" ...


2

If you look at the Hiragana chart below, you notice that there are no corresponding letters for "yi" and "ye". Those letters do not exist in Japanese (not that we can't pronounce it). (From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiragana) When we need to write foreign words containing "yi" and "ye", we use イ, and イエ (or sometimes イェ) respectively. A good example ...


3

イン is pretty much the standard way to transliterate Chinese "ying" to kana. Here are some examples: 陶晶瑩 - Taiwanese celebrity Pinyin: Táo Jīngyíng Kana: タオ・チンイン 劉若英 - Taiwanese celebrity Pinyin: Liú RuòYīng Kana: リウ・ルオイン 馬英九 - President of Taiwan Pinyin: Mǎ Yīngjiǔ Kana: either ばえいきゅう (on'yomi of each kanji) or マー・インチウ (direct transcription of what ...


3

I agree that イン is probably the best fit for the limitations of Japanese. Of course, being Chinese, your friend already has a kanji for his/her name, so you could always just use that and write イン as furigana for it. Alternatively -- and I don't know how much this would happen in real life -- you could just use a Japanese pronunciation for the name's ...


0

非回答者 answer is very good, but I would just like to add 2 points: If using katakana please use タウンゼンド. Reading "bed" written as "ベット" makes me cringe(Double d is not natural in Japanese but it still can be represented and is not a Japanese word anyways). I will second "町の端" with "の" inside. "の" does look strange in a name, but otherwise I think it is ...


6

「[端]{はし}の[町]{まち}」 means "a town at the end (of something)", which is probably not what you are looking for. 「町の端」 means "one end of a town", which is the meaning I suppose you would want. The 「の」 does not look good in a name, so you might just drop it and use a 「町端」, which might actually exist as a family name. It would probably be read まちはた instead of ...


4

なるべく is an adverb and the meaning is "as~as possible". なるべき is made up from a verb なる and a Japanese old auxiliary べし. The meaning of べし is 「~して当然だ。するのがよい。」 and so on. べき is a conjugation change of べし. For example, 明日はなるべく早く起きよう。( I will wake up as early as possible tomorrow). あなたは英語の先生になるべきだ。(You should/have to be an English teacher).


4

「なるベく」 should be considered a single word meaning you want to do something or want something done "as [...] as possible". For example, 「お問い合わせはなるべく短めにお願いします。」 would mean "Please keep any inquiries as short as possible.". The 「~べき」 suffix gets attached to verbs and means "should", so 「なるべき」 means "should become". For example,「なるべきようになった。」 means "It is as it ...



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