Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Change ありました into the plain form, あった, to be followed by んです: [遅]{おそ}かったですね。[何]{なに}かあったんですか。 You're late. What happened? (Lit. [You] were late. Did anything happen?)


1

森、平原、峡谷、湖・・・。 This is a simple listing of nouns. It's not a complete sentence, and there's no grammatical role to mark, so they aren't missing any particles—though if it helps you make sense of it, you could insert a listing particle of some sort after each noun, like と or や. In this case, や might fit better (the ellipsis suggests that the list ...


0

In this context, "離れているはずの厨房" should be "The kitchen, which I thought was far away". Because, In this case, "はず" enphases hungry feeling. "今夜は晴れのはず" / "I believe that tonight's sky is clear." is good. he is expecting clear sky, but, Its not in fact. In many cases, "はず" includes feeling of expectation.


2

The primary meaning of 面倒な/面倒くさい is "bothersome", "time-consuming", or "annoying". The phrase "boring job" usually corresponds to 退屈【たいくつ】な仕事, 面白【おもしろ】くない仕事 or つまらない仕事. So I basically agree that translating 面倒 as "boring" is not very literal. But there are times when translators intentionally avoid literal translations for various reasons. I can't say ...


0

It is true that "面倒" implies boring. However, You should not translate "面倒" into "boring". "面倒" ordinary means that the problem has a little difficulty for the speaker. ex. 君には面倒をかけてしまった this sentence doesn't mean that the speaker made the other boring, but means that the speaker gave the other trouble.


4

The ~方向に持って行く is metaphorizing something which can be taken in the direction of romance. In this case it's either "the two's relationship" or "the novel in general". この場合は「笑い話」ということなので「会話」を物にたとえて「持って行く」と表現しています http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1049626510 The あんまり effects the 持って行きたくない, ie. the author doesn't really want to ...


4

A word-by-word translation would be: その試験が、私がどの大学に行くかを決める。 An active voice sentence with an abstract or lifeless noun as a subject (主語) sounds unnatural. A better translation is: 試験の結果によってどの大学に行くかが決まる。 If you want to clarify “I”: 試験の結果によって私が行く大学が決まる。


1

たる was used by to express the likelihood of becoming something or someone: 〇〇になることができる。 彼{かれ}に次代{じだい}の礎{いしずえ}たる資質{ししつ}を見出{みいだ}し。 Means the character in question has the potential to become a pillar for the next generation. The following are simplified versions meaning roughly the same: 彼ならば次{つぎ}の時代{じだい}の基盤{きばん}を築{きず}くことができる才能{さいのう}があると思った。 ...


7

I think it's [御朱印帳]{ごしゅいんちょう}.


4

Japan doesn't seem to have an issue with using Spanish words for food (at least, not if パエリア is any indication). If we look on Wikipedia for arroz con pollo, we can see that their transcription is "アロス・コン・ポーヨ". That said, as with any language, you can use the native name if you want, but if the target culture has no concept of what it is, you're going to be ...


3

I don't think 資料共有 can be shortened into 資料共. In any occasion. Actually I first read it as しりょうども; 資料 + 共 (ども: somewhat derrogative plural suffix usually used only for people) which didn't make sense. I never thought of the word 共有 (きょうゆう) until you mentioned it, and I don't think anyone of Japanese native speakers would. Then what is this? Sorry I don't ...


2

There are no one-to-one translations here. It really depends on who is talking to who and the context of the conversation. I believe after all in these two sentences are similar, but they take slightly different meaning. The first sentence implies that they were aware of some indications or expectations of snowing. Maybe they had a chat about whether it is ...


3

Deepen my relationship with students. Learn more about them and spend more time talking with them. 生徒達との人間関係をより深めたいと思います。そのためにも彼らとコミュニケーションを積極的にかわしていきたいです。 生活についてもっと知って行きたいと思います。 sounds a bit odd to me. 生活について sounds as if you are also interested in knowing their personal lives, e.g. when they sleep or wake up. Nothing wrong with that I guess, but ...


2

I think for this "after all", your best choice is だって. You should wear a jacket. After all, it's snowing out there. ジャケット着たほうがいいよ。だって、雪が降っているからね。 Of course I bought you a present! It's our anniversary after all. もちろんプレゼント買ってあるよ。だって、俺たちの記念日じゃん。 If you want a formal sentence, I think you should have different example sentences. Especially the ...


3

The sentence looks old. In modern Japanese, it would be: だれも触れることのできない才媛 Here, “何人も” is translated into “だれも”, and “する [こと] 能わぬ” into “することができない”. This phrase is a derivative of the following sentence: その才媛にはだれも触れることができない。 Now, does this mean “No one can” or “Not enveryone can”? The answer is “No one can”. Why? “だれも” is usually used as an ...


1

This is the volitional form of かける: in particular, this expression is 声をかける. It has several meanings, the most general being "to speak/call out to". It can also mean "to inform or let know". So it's essentially just two questions in a row. There's no special pattern here. Depending on the context of the novel... [Should I say something? What ...


5

かける here would literally mean something like "to cast", but 声をかける is an expression in Japanese to mean "to greet someone", "to say something (to someone)", or even "to invite someone (to something)" and "to cheer someone up (in sports)". It is actually rare to see it written in kanji. If you are to still write it, it would be 声を掛ける. So, 声をかけようかどうしようか迷っていた ...


2

It literally means "a talented woman whom no one is able to touch". 能わぬ would mean "not be able to". But, I would personally translate this to "a talented woman whom no one can get close to" or something similar.


0

I don't know much about movies but here is my guess. “総” means “whole”. eg. “総収入” is “total income”. Googling “総監修” gave some examples and it seems to be used as “everything is supervised by somebody”. Thus “ストーリー総監修” seems to mean “the whole story was supervised by somebody”.


-2

Ok, after a while I improved a little and could understand how to translate it. It means "Document sharing".


4

I don't think that "even a fool has a talent" is a fitting translation. (If one would want to say that it should be something like 馬鹿にも一芸.) Rather, 馬鹿も一芸 means something like "even being a fool can be a talent".


4

As a whole sentence, 「士郎の理想、英雄となった姿」 is the long subject phrase. If I have to narrow down, 理想 and 姿 are the two parallel subjects. According to this Wikipedia article, this tweet, and this page, this question is made in a special context. Here, the speaker is talking to Archer, who is supposed to be the reincarnation of Shirou, who wanted to became a hero. ...


1

The second is far better... and it's good that you don't trust the online translators. :) I'd recommend doing some Google searches of the verb(s) in question and kind of copying and pasting. Other than that, it's going to be hard to know what verbs to use when w/o immersion.


0

英雄となった姿 is followed by が which should tell you it's not that. Ex: 彼は目が青。(subj: him). Can't tell w/o some reference, but the subject is あなた. Could be Shirou, might not be.


7

揺らぎやすい女性 is not an idiomatic phrase, and it is not until you read the second line that you can tell what it actually refers to. The meaning of 揺らぐ here is clearly described in the second line, "私たち(女性)の体が大きく変化する" due to the menstruation cycle. But I think 揺らぎやすい女性 is a misleading expression. We have two 和語 verbs which use this kanji: 揺【ゆ】らぐ and 揺【ゆ】れる. We ...


5

「好きな~」 generally corresponds to "~ which one likes", and one can safely have multiple 好きな色 and 好きな食べ物. 好きな色は赤と黒です。 Some E-J dictionaries say "favorite" is "特に好きな" or "大好きな", which means the English adjective "favorite" is usually stronger than 好きな. And as far as I know, English has no single-word adjective which exactly matches 好きな. I think "favorite" ...



Top 50 recent answers are included