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9

A コラ (or コラ画像) can roughly be devided into two categories: A コラ that looks as if it were genuine. For example, an image of an anime character, porn actress, etc., whose head is skillfully replaced with the head of someone else. Making a good コラ in this sense requires a great amount of time and skill. A コラ that is meant to be served as a pure joke, as in ...


8

It's not uncommon to see people use apparently derogatory words among themselves to increase the togetherness of community, and so does Japanese internet society, as a long tradition. You can find a number of such Japanese memes like これはひどい "that's terrible", マジキチ "absolutely crazy", 作者は病気 "the author's sick" etc. which actually praising their eccentricity ...


8

The issue is in the verb choice, not in the particle. The only possible particle is indeed で. If that is not used, the longer phrase 「~~を使って」 will have to be used. The verb to use here is 考える, not 思う. 思う is too passive in meaning. Native speakers would say: 「(私は)日本語と英語で考えています。」 or 「(私は)日本語と英語の両方で考えています。」


8

I'm pretty sure Mariko is [真]{ma}[理]{ri}[子]{ko} ([真理]{shinri}=truth, 子=child). Emiko is probably [恵]{e}[美]{mi}[子]{ko} (恵=blessing, grace, etc. 美=beauty). As for Midori, I have no idea. We have [緑]{midori}, [美]{mi}[登]{do}[里]{ri}, [翠]{midori} etc., but none of them would mean "Youthful immortal".


7

It is 「は」, not 「わ」. The 「は」 here is of course pronounced 「わ」 because it is a particle. 「もう[早送]{はやおく}りでよいのでは!」 = 「もう早送りでよいのではないか (ないだろうか, ないでしょうか, etc.)!」 The last part is not said but is understood between the speaker and listener. This happens so very often in Japanese. "Maybe we should just fast-forward it from here on?" 「のでは」 is used to make a ...


6

Since "youthful immortal" is not a common reading for the name "Midori," if you have the opportunity to ask your parents their intended kanji, that would be the easiest route. The main kanji for Midori is 緑 (meaning greenery, or the color green). There are a few obsolete kanji variations on it that hold the same meaning. Another possible combination that ...


5

You've gotten a few things confused here. Here, ふる is a verb meaning "to dump" (or "to reject"). I don't know that "trip up" is a meaning of ふる, though I could well be unaware of it. So, ~にふられる means "to be dumped by ~". The 恋人 is the 友達's 恋人, not the speaker's. 落ち込む should be seen as a single verb with its own meaning here, rather than as a compound of ...


5

I think the most-often used generic word would be 「[京劇]{きょうげき}」 and that is used many times as often as 「チャイニーズ・オペラ」 in the media. Technically speaking, 「京劇」 may be used only to refer to the Beijing version of the art, but if you used the term, Japanese-speakers would at least know that you were referring to the "traditional" Chinese theater. I do know for ...


5

I really do not think that the issue here is how to translate 「要する」. If your TL above is any indication, I do not think you are familiar with the sentence structure 「AしてまでBする」, which is more important. 「AしてまでBする」 = "to go so far as to do A in order to do B" In the sentence in question: Action A = 一万年という遠大な時間を要する Action B = 自己修復する 「要する」 can be ...


5

The key phrase is "as if". It should work basically every time you need to translate a phrase containing 「かのような」. "Verb Phrase + かのような + Noun" = "(Noun) as if (Verb Phrase) " Whatever event is described in the verb phrase DID NOT occur. It just feels as if it had happened. 「[頭]{あたま}に[釘]{くぎ}を[打]{う}たれたかのような[激痛]{げきつう}」 = "a/the 激痛 that felt as if ...


5

「[子供]{こども}に[話]{はなし}を[聞]{き}かせてあげました。」 Does this sentence seem natural to a native Japanese speaker? Yes, it is perfectly natural, correct, grammatical, etc. It has no problem whatsoever on any level. No one was forced to either tell or listen to a story, either. No stress or pressure on either party is implied in the sentence. It simply says ...


5

Both 「[多]{おお}い」 and 「多くの」 mean "many" but their usages are completely different. Grammar in terms of parts of speech: 「多い」 is an adjective all by itself. 「多くの」=「多く」 + 「の」. 「多く」 is a noun meaning "plenty" and because it is a noun, it needs to be followed directly by 「の」 to function like an adjective. Usages: To express "many (noun)", one can say ...


4

I guess Midori is 緑. 緑 (green) suggests plants with green leaves. 新緑 (fresh green in spring) -> Youthful 常緑樹 (evergreen plant) -> Immotal


4

First, let us review the adjectives involved to make sure there is no confusion. Size vs. Quantity/Frequency: Size: 「[小]{ちい}さい」 = "small". 「[大]{おお}きい」 = "large" Quantity/Frequency: 「[少]{すく}ない」 = "few", "a little", "not frequent" 「[多]{おお}い」 = "many", "much", "frequent" Moving on to Grammar: To express "to get or become (adjective)" in ...


4

As a literal translation, it's wrong.  本気になれぬ ≒本気になれない ≒(You) can't get serious. (Side note: if you look at the rest of the lyrics, it's pretty clear that at least some of the clauses before 「ウルフボーイ」 don't act as relative clauses, so I don't think the meaning of this line is "The wolf boy who can't get serious", but just "You can't get serious; ...


4

I don't think that 感じ is always used in the sense of trying to point to someone's feelings/sentiments. If 感じ points to anyone's feelings, I'd say it would be the feelings of 人A. In this usage, I think one can safely translate it with "like", as in 私の食生活が気になっている感じですか So it's like you're interested in my eating habits? So you're saying you're ...


4

Minasan (皆【みな】さん) means everyone, and it's mainly used as a vocative, just like you say in English, "Hello, everyone!" to people in front of you. Hosutofamiri- no (ホストファミリーの) modifies Minasan. And in this case, the particle no (の) indicates the host family is in apposition to Minasan. (Ex. Rudolph, the reindeer = トナカイのルドルフ; My friend Kevin = 友達のケビン) So ...


3

オーストラリアは 今 夏で とても あつい です。 Does this sentence mean: Australia is currently in Summer and it's very hot. Or, Australia is now very hot in summer. The former. =オーストラリアは今、夏です。+ とても暑いです。 The で is a 断定の助動詞「だ」, not a case particle(格助詞).


3

I personally don't feel the words mesh very well with the situation you've explained, though I have no idea how the plot is actually going on. Maybe a page of the original work would be helpful and not infringe the New York State law. However, my first impression tells that 余裕 in your quote isn't meant to be physical distance or margin, but mental ...


3

I speak Japanese, English and Spanish. I only checked the outline of the movie and will answer in a general way. The characters should talk in a formal way like "Usted". In Japanese, polite expressions are much more frequently used than in Spanish. For example, I would use "Tù" for family or close friends, and use "Usted" for relatives, colleagues, or ...


3

書き込みによると means "according to the entry/note." 書き込み = (handwritten) note; post; jotting; entry. によると = a JLPT 1 grammar point that means "according to". You can read more on this grammatical form here. Hope this helps!


2

でも[抱]{だき}しめ[続]{つづ}けると [温]{あたたか}くなるんだ I think it's something along the lines of "But if you keep holding (each other?), you'll be warm." (I would normally write these as [抱]{だ}きしめ(る) and [温]{あたた}か(い), by the way.) Even if I know the kanji themselves I have a hard time recognizing them when it's handwritten... I often have a hard time ...


2

Yes, you are correct. In the real Japanese-speaking world, however, it would be more natural to say 「[聞]{き}こえなかった」 than to say 「聞けなかった」.


2

It's a small error. That should be a 'っ', not a 'つ'. 餌{えさ}取{と}って来{く}る。 It now means "[I'll] get some bait then come back." 〜ってくる is quite a common structure in Japanese with other verbs, showing you'll do the action then come back (in this case getting the bait, then returning).


2

Parse it this say: {どうして勉強しているのか(を)}忘れがちになる。 どうして勉強しているか is the object of 忘れ(る). 「勉強は自分のためにしている」ということを忘れないでほしい。 The と is the quotative particle.


2

The mistake you're doing is misunderstanding the usage of "embedded" questions. My translation: When you get busy with exams and your studies it can be easy to forget why you're even studying, but I want you to remember that you're studying for your own benefit. See the answer: These are sometimes called embedded questions, but if you look them up you'll ...


2

The conclusion is that, user4092's comment on the question is correct. It means: person who you are forcing to work all the time And 働かせられっぱなしの人間 would be rather unnatural here, because, (1) in this situation, he is blaming her for her act, saying that it's she that has worked him into the ground; (2) it must share the same subject with 掛ける言葉, ...


2

You can use "何の話?", "何のこと?", "何の話ですか?", or "何のことですか?" A:「すごかったよ!」 B: 「え? 何の話?」 (casual) A:「明日までにやってください。」 B: 「すみません、何のことですか?」 (politer) (jumping into a conversation)「ねえねえ、何の話?」 何 here can be read as either なん or なに, but the latter sound politer. Note that using "言う" in this situation can sound accusatory. 何を言っているの? ≒Are you kidding? ...


2

Japanese's particle system comes in handy here. 何【なに】が(ですか)? (for asking the subject) 何【なに】を(ですか)? (for asking the object) Exchanges like this can be difficult to translate into English... Or for instance: (「あれ」って)何【なん】のこと?(ですか?・かよく分かりません)


2

握手会でもファンの方が当たったよ!って嬉しそうに言ってくれた Xが当たる in this context means "to win X", where X is a ticket, prize, lottery, etc. 安奈's fan said to her, 「(チケットが)当たったよ!」 = "I won it (=the ticket of the show)!" 最初は誰の手もかりず振りVを見て一人で覚えたあと るかに細かい振りを教えてもらいながらフリを覚えたって言ってた The omitted subject of all these actions is 高塚ちゃん. 高塚ちゃん studied the choreography alone first, then ...



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