Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

Numbers written with Arabic numerals are usually positional. The place value of each digit depends on its position in the sequence: 1b2 + 2b1 + 3b0 = 123 Numbers written with kanji are typically non-positional. Although they usually appear in the same order, rather than use position alone to indicate their place value, they're generally combined with ...


10

I think the most universal way of expressing trying is using て-form of a verb followed by みる. For example: 電話してみるよ。 I will try calling you. お好み焼きを食べてみたい。 I want to try eating okonomiyaki. In addition, what you can express in English as "try" as in "have you tried?" is sometimes asking about past experience and can be expressed in Japanese as ...


9

You can use 「シェアする」 which is, I believe, used in the context of computer software and websites, apps, etc. Shorter「シェア」is also used, e.g. on Facebook app. I've seen it on some websites, e.g. on Japanese Amazon next to Facebook, Twitter, etc. buttons which is similar to what you want to do. Example from Facebook app: Example from Japanese Amazon:


9

分け合う and 分かち合う do translate to "share", literally as in "sharing an apple with two other people [by dividing it into thirds]" and figuratively as in "sharing your joys and sorrows with your loved ones". I won't try to distinguish them here because I don't think either word is quite right, so it's not entirely relevant, but I don't think either word is ...


8

Yes, you are missing something important in the second sentence 「よく道を聞いてもらいます。」. Your understanding of the first is good, judging from the TL. The second sentence, by the way, is 100% grammatical but its content/meaning is more than just weird. It is highly unlikely that a policeman would say it unless there was an incredibly super-shy policeman ...


7

The word that we often use to express enthusiasm is 「[是非]{ぜひ}」= "by all means". 「是非[行]{い}きます!」,「是非行きたいです!」,「是非行きましょう!」, 「是非行こう!」, etc. You can add 「あ」 or 「あっ」 in front of 「是非」, too. To express even more enthusiasm, you could use 「[絶対]{ぜったい}」 or 「[必]{かなら}ず」 in place of 「是非」.


6

The main differences are in the formality/informality of these words, not really in their meanings. They all mean "to roam about (aimlessly)" and I will mention the small difference in nuance later on. 「ぶらつく」 and 「うろつく」 are more informal than 「さまよう」. The existence of the onomatopoeias 「ぶらぶら」 and 「うろうろ」 should tell you something about the colloquiality of ...


6

What is it that you want to let a future you deal with? I ask mostly because 「[対応]{たいおう}」 is a fairly big word and it may be too big a word to go with whatever you are talking about if it is not very serious. As always, the most natural phrases will not look anything like the English original. 「(そうなったらなったで、)その[時]{とき}に[自分]{じぶん}で[考]{かんが}えます(or 対応します)。」 ...


6

It seems you're not interpreting the sentence quite correctly. It should be "As a child I had no way of knowing how my mother felt at that time." 当時とうじ母ははがどんな気持きもちだったのか Would be "how my mother felt at the time." 子こどもの私わたしには知しるべくもないことだった。 I think this is where you might be getting thrown off. 子供の私には is what you need to focus on. 子供の私 is the ...


5

Although it is usually the transitive verb that takes a "Noun + を" in front of it, there is an important exception to this general rule. Intransitive verbs such as 向く、[走]{はし}る (to run)、[飛]{と}ぶ (to fly)、[出]{で}る (to get out), etc. can take a "Noun + を" when it describes the place of an action or the direction of a movement. 上を向く = to look upward ...


5

It's a different way of saying the causative-passive 行かせられる, so it means that the speaker was made to go to the hospital. Note in an earlier version of this answer I confidently asserted that this is a more colloquial example. A comment was posted to the contrary and, after researching it more in depth, I was surprised to find I was indeed wrong in that ...


5

When you only see 一二三, the context always matters. (As you may know, Japanese language generally rely very much on the context to decide the meaning.) You use 百二十三 kind of way only when you want to specify that numbers are like "one hundred twenty-three". This kind of expressions however tends to be redundant (二億三千五百九十五万三千百四十五=235,953,445). So you ...


5

ころ means "around", "about", or "(at) the time". So it translates to: At the time I'd just come back to London, ... Note that it's come to London, not come back from London. Other common usages include 子供のころ → When I was a child 高校生のころ → When I was in high school


5

I think you're parsing the sentence wrong. I read it as something like: There was no way that I, as a child, could have known what my mother was feeling back then. I think the one who couldn't have known was 子どもの私, and the thing they couldn't have known was 当時母がどんな気持ちだったのか.


4

Your translation is correct. However, this が isn't the "but" one. It's the "softener" one. I can't think of a way to translate it (if there even is one), but it's often used to make one's own desires/actions seem less direct and a little more humble. Ex. 聞きたいことがあるんですが... → There's something I'd like to ask you... The difference between ...


4

First, I checked the lyrics on two different websites to find that, on both, there was a space after the 「魔法みたい」, which would mean that we need to treat it as an independent phrase. "It's like magic." Lyrics: http://lyrics.jetmute.com/viewlyrics.php?id=274938 「あなたしか見えないすべてが初めての私」 is the Japanese equivalent of an English relative clause --- "A me who ...


3

The main thing to take into account here is the ~てもらう that's used in the second sentence. With this construction, the subject receives the benefit of an action. To illustrate: 母【はは】に晩【ばん】ご飯【はん】を作【つく】ってもらった。 (My mother made dinner for me.) 先生【せんせい】に文章【ぶんしょう】を読【よ】んでもらった。 (The teacher read the sentence for us.) So in this case, it's not simply that ...


3

Generally speaking a sentence ending in の will be less formal equivalent of the "の/んです" construction. Hence: Questions ending in の, as in your examples, are less formal equivalents of the same questions ending in んですか. Likewise Questions ending in the plain/past form are less formal equivalents of (in your examples) questions ending with ...


3

I think the other answers address it pretty well but I just want to throw in something that's a little weird about [研究室]{けんきゅうしつ} gets used versus "lab". [研究所]{けんきゅうしょ} is the place of study on the level of university or more likely research center. I say research center is more likely than university, because Japanese universities are, in my experience, ...


3

研究所 means "research institute". I have never seen 研究屋 (and it's not to be found in the BCCWJ corpus). I think that 研究屋 is 研究 "research" with the suffix 屋, which could have a number of nuances, e.g. "someone scientifically-minded", "Mr. Research". For a better translation, you'd have to provide some context. In any case, 研究屋 is definitely not a way to refer ...


3

I think you're misunderstanding the use of 代名詞 in this. The whole is: The feeling my mother had at that time was not something I could understand as a child. I think what's confusing use is the second half based on your translation 子{こ}どもの私{わたし} = me as a child 子{こ}どもの私{わたし}に = to me as a child 子{こ}どもの私{わたし}に は = to me as a child --> I had ...


3

The interpretations are correct but there is still a bit more to get from this passage: The expression: 当時母ははがどんな気持きもちだったのか、 is correctly translated as: "As to how my mother felt at the time" but the "、" can be seen as functioning like "は":This phrase is the topic of the rest of the sentence. It links directly to "ことだった。", as in AはBことだた (ie ...


2

After looking at this and using rikaikun (Chrome Extension): Looking it up in Tagaini Jisho gives me the ろく entry, but the top-right radical is written differently, even though one of the listed components is "彑". (A variant of 彑 is 彐 or ⺕). It appears to be a kanji character that's used sparingly in Japanese, probably 人名用漢字 (JinmeiyouKanji) (Kanji ...


2

I think the name will vary and in smaller book shops where sales of foreign books let alone Japanese text books are rare you may not find anything. By chance today I noticed in Kinokuniya, one of the largest book shops in Tokyo, that the Japanese text book section was next to the foreign books and magazine section and split into: 日本語教育 and "Learning ...


2

One could argue that the sentence in question may not be logical, but it is certainly a sentence that follows all the grammatical rules that I can think of. In that sense, it "makes sense" even if some people might not agree with. On that regard, I don't find your second sentence any better. It is a grammatically correct sentence that contains the same kind ...


2

For what it's worth, I know of psyllium husk powder both in English and in Japanese. I've seen it as サイリウムパウダー サイリウムハスクパウダー サイリウムシードパウダー オオバコの粉末 (サイリウム) in the context of raw food diet recipes (as binding agent). Recipes often just write something like 「サイリウム (オオバコ) 5g」 though, even if the recipe definitely calls for powder. (You can find all ...


2

First, 全部の人 is an obscure expression because 全部 is a counter for objects* (that said, 私が知っている人全部のうち sounds to some extent better for some reason), so I'd translate "all of the people" to 私が知っているすべての人 or 私が知っている人全員、私が知っている人すべて. As for your question, yes, the sentence with うち is correct too and you can omit the particle で after うち. If you use に instead of で, ...


2

Yes, it's used very much like Versus. However! As Tokyo Nagoya pointed out, バーサス is usable sometimes, too. Plus, occasionally クロス (that is, "X", usually a sign of collaboration) will be used like "Versus" depending on the context. For example, it's "Capcom vs. SNK" in both Japan and the US, but it's "Street Fighter X Tekken" in both territories.


2

My sense could be wrong, and I'm sure I'll be told if it is so, but I don't think those words (with one exception) are useful for what you want as in "to try": 味わう = literally to taste the flavor of something as in while you are cooking 嘗める = to lick something -- also a term for when someone is trying to mess with you. 試す = to test something 味見 = to taste ...


2

それで -- Then,/So,/And,... いつになれば --> いつになったら -- When, How long do I have to wait till... 俺のお嫁さん -- my bride に -- case particle なってくれる? -- verb なる(become) + conjunctive particle て + subsidiary verb くれる(will you do me the favor of...?)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible