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10

The last thing I want to do is compete with Google Translate, but "he" is wrong again. It means "Say anything but 'good-bye'." 「~~だけは + Verb in negative form」 is a common expression meaning: "(Verb) anything but ~~" 「ピーマンだけは食{た}べられません。」 = "I can eat anything but green peppers." 「マリアとだけは結婚{けっこん}したくない。」 = "I would marry anybody but Maria." ...


9

Q. I'm asking if somebody could break the sentence down for me, grammarwise, so I understand it and can make a sentence like it myself. A. I'll try to break this down into individual pieces to make it as understandable as possible. 「彼の日本語のレベルは私と同じくらいだ。」 彼 - he の - particle showing possession (i.e., 's, of) 彼の - his 日本語 - Japanese の - particle ...


7

真綿感 itself is not an idiomatic phrase, but this 真綿感 is a weak reference to the well-known idiom 真綿で首を絞める, meaning "something unpleasant is happening very slowly", "to torture slowly by an indirect means", etc. And this 真綿 (floss silk) represents something 'indirect', 'vague', or 'fuzzy'. In the linked example, the author was disappointed by the quality of ...


7

写真をお届け! I think it's short for 写真をお届けします! or 写真をお届けいたします! "We will deliver a photo/photos to you!" お届けする is the humble form (謙譲語) of 届ける. Examples: ~をご報告 / ご案内 / ご連絡 / ご紹介(いた)します!--> ~をご報告!/ご案内!/ご連絡!/ご紹介! キャンペーン情報をお知らせ(いた)します!--> キャンペーン情報をお知らせ!


7

Not exactly (as several have commented). This is how you talk about fractions in Japanese: 7分の1 → 1/7 Literally, you can think about it as 'one part of seven'. It is not a ratio, i.e. 'one part to seven parts', as that equates to 1/8.


7

引用文の終わりに、括弧に入れて (訳は筆者による) ←recommended または、(筆者訳) ← recommended (拙訳) (私訳) のように書くとよいと思います。


5

I think 電撃 is not so strange as a translated material, but anyway... I'm afraid I don't know the standard way to assert your translation of a certain expression is correct without disclosing the original English phrase. Something like (この部分は原文を直訳したもの) might work, but that's annoying and uncommon. In general, it's a common practice to specify the original ...


5

「日記{にっき}を書{か}いていたら(、)まさにお腹{なか}がすいてきた。」 does not mean: "I am certain to get hungry when I write in my diary." That English sentence suggests that the speaker always or habitually gets hungry when he writes in his diary, corect? The point of utterance can be anytime. The original sentence does not talk about what always/usually happens. It is ...


4

You can use ステップ or 手順【てじゅん】. 手順1, 手順2, 手順3, ... ステップ1, ステップ2, ステップ3, ... Xをするには3つの手順が必要です。 Xをするには3ステップが必要です。 (You can use ステップ as a counter.) Also note that the proper word for 'finally' in this context is 最後【さいご】に, not ついに. ついに means 'at last'.


4

We do say 「考{かんが}え迷{まよ}う」, so the phrase certainly is nothing new or strange in itself. The real question, however, is whether or not it fits your particular context. 「考え迷う」 would often represent indecision, passivity and randomness. If that were the kind of thinking that you were involved in, it would be a reasonable word choice. If you had more ...


4

The 出来 means [出来栄]{できば}え, 完成度, クオリティ, etc. 「~~するほどの出来/出来栄え/完成度だった・になっていた」 means 「~~するほど出来/出来栄えがよかった」「~~するほど完成度/質が高かった」. I think it's like: "(Something) was so well-made that it could~~" "The quality (of something) was good enough to~~"


3

「そう」, in this context, means "yes", not "so". (For fairness, one could argue that "yes" and "so" are related as they are both used for affirmation.) It is the introspective kind of "yes" that one uses to affirm and/or remember an event involving oneself. This 「そう」 is quite often used in song lyrics, light poetry, romantic letters, etc. 「君{きみ}と二人{ふたり}」 ...


3

Yes, 「7分の1」 means same as 1:7 mathematically. 1:7 = (1/8):(7/8) = (1/8)/(7/8) = (1/8)x(8/7) = 8/56 = 1/7 However, in Japan, kids are taught that 1:7 is 「[比]{ひ}」 and 1/7 is 「[分数]{ぶんすう}」. I guess that 「比」 is translated as "ratios", and 「分数」 is translated as "fractions" generally. So, Japanese people tend to think that 1/7 is not a ratio, maybe. In ...


3

Q. Can someone translate and explain this to me? 「こんなばかな私をどうして愛してくれるの?」 A. First I'll break it down and then give what may be an explanation for the sentence. こんな - this kind of ばかな - idiot, stupid こんなばかな - this kind of stupid 私 - me こんなばかな私 - this kind of stupid person (literally "me") を - particle that marks the object of the sentence どうして - ...


3

内外 can mean the outside and inside of any organization. It can be 国内と国外, 社内と社外, 学校内と学校外, and so on, depending on the context. In this example, this 内外 is probably 社内と社外 or 家庭内と家庭外, but if you can't determine, don't worry. 内外で sometimes just means 'in many places' or 'everywhere'.


3

Yours is, I must say. This sentence would not lend itself to "perfect literal translation" in English because of its structure. Hard as you may try, you will end up needing to make adjustments so that your translation would sound natural in the target language. In your case, you ended up using the passive voice form "are influenced", which is not used in ...


3

あたし すぐに あのひと(テリィ) だと わかったけれど Though I instantly knew/realized it was him (=Terry) あたし I すぐに instantly/immediately/at once あのひと that person >> him だ (a copula) と (the quotative particle) わかった realized/knew/found けれど though


3

In this context, 「ゆとり」 would mean more like "mental affluence" than "time". It would be synonymous to 「心{こころ}のゆとり」, which we also often use. One would, of course, certainly need to have time to obtain mental affluence.


3

I think you have almost grasped the "tournure" and I have few to contribute, but... I assume the phrase is still a contraction of 見ていて That's correct. As for the example, the girl in the film says おとう、見てて. That corresponds to "Look at me (doing this), Dad." it would mean something like "check out this website (and continue doing so for a nontrivial ...


2

I think the expression is done in a roundabout way (if not in gibberish.) I am convinced it should have been written in plain Japanese. That said, I would translate (親 は) --- 生じて きた こと を 喜ぶ こと の できる 心 の 余裕 を 持ちたい もの である as It is desirable that parents should take it easy and congratulate that their child has grown to show aspiration. I know this is not ...


2

I think ひゃっほーい is to be understood as a variant of ヤッホー ヤッホー [1] 【yo-ho】 (感) 山で、仲間に合図をしたりする語。また、喜びを表す語。「—、いいぞいいぞ」 (Unfortunately, I don't know how you call your friends in the mountains in English. "Heeey!"?) ヤッホー is commonly used to call out to your friends or to get their attention (not just in the mountains). (For example, you arrange to ...


2

If I were you, I would say 'Xを食べるよう進化した' ( X wo taberu you shinka shita ).


2

Although I agree with the above answer, it does not insist on a particular photograph. If you really need to ask "With which camera was this particular picture taken", I would go with : この写真{しゃしん}はどんなカメラで写{うつ}されましたか。 I will explain the main grammar point: 写す means "to photograph". In this case, we want to ask how this picture was taken, hence, we use ...


2

Using まめ is correct in the context of getting a blister on your sole. 水疱 and 水ぶくれ have same meaning, but the former one is academic term. 火ぶくれ is only used for it caused by burns.


2

言えれば would mean "If I could say" since the れ in there indicates the potential form. (Obviously the pronoun I could be replaced with he/she/it/whatever as appropriate in context.) I would translate 助けてくださいなんて言えれば as "If I could say 'please help me'" or "if only I could ask for help".


1

Does this help? 「患者本位の診療をしたい」と(考えて)、自分の理想とする医療の実現を目指して、一生懸命になってインフォームドコンセントを得ようとしながら、挫折する若い医師は珍しくない。 I guess the above can be roughly translated into something like It is not unusual to see young MDs getting frustrated by failing to practise informed consent as a form of patient-oriented treatment in their pursuit of ideal medication. Caveat: the ...


1

To me it sounds just fine, though I would use the て form with います to make it clear you're asking about what カメラ they're using now. You're being polite enough by using ます so don't worry about it. The new sentence will be: どんなカメラを使って いますか?


1

"受{うけ}付{つけ}" usually means "receptionist." And we usually say "店{てん}員{いん}" for general (= not necessarily administrative) "shop clerk." While "筆店" makes sense to mean "brush shop" as in -> arimahude.com, many Japanese brush shops seem to prefer calling themselves "筆{ふで}専{せん}門{もん}店{てん}" as in -> fudeya-shop.comor , or more fancy(?) "筆 セレクトショップ" and the ...


1

In that context I would use "家{か}系{けい}" or "系{けい}統{とう}" meaning "lineage" and "descent" respectively. And I wonder if the following helps : 「出生率を制限する力が実現する」とは、心身ともに健全で、倫理的に高い基準を持ち、社会的責任を明確に理解した人々が多くの子孫を生み出し、基準値‌​が低い人々は、‌​その家族の(構成員)数を減らし、身体が虚弱で精神障害を抱えている系統は、競争から脱落する、という意味である Of course the above is one of many possibilities.


1

Passing judgement about your own Japanese skills while talking with a Japanese native speaker is a little strange. I'd recommend: "日本語{にほんご}ができるようになっている気{き}がしています。" (1) "気{き}がしています" adds the meaning that your opinion about your Japanese skills is yours alone. (2) The present continuous tense "~~になっている" adds the meaning that you think that you are on the ...



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