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12

In Japanese, usually 改善【かいぜん】 is no more than a neutral and simple word that corresponds to "improvement" or "refinement". The only fact I know as a piece of knowledge, which make this word somewhat "special", is that some companies like Toyota love this word as a slogan. Apparently, Toyota's special method of 改善, also written specifically as "カイゼン", has ...


10

シャレオツ (syareotu) is slang for お洒落 (osyare) .


7

I am afraid that your understanding of the third form is incorrect. 「捕らえられていた」 is the equivalent of the English "pluperfect passive voice". There is no "progressive" expressed in this. In English, it would be "had been caught (and had stayed in captivity since)".


7

やめとこう is the volitional form of やめとく, which is a very frequently heard contraction of やめておく (やめる written in kanji would be 止める: to stop (doing something)). The て-form of a verb plus おく (originally from 置く: to put down) is a bit hard to explain concisely, but usually should be taken as to (not) do something now, rather than let things run their course. In ...


6

The "large amount" is the key here, and the flavor of 佃煮 is not important. 佃煮 is a kind of preservative food, and it is made when we have too much food. So "佃煮にするほどあった" here means "there were too many (Japanese expressions) which I couldn't digest/handle for now". But this idiom is rare. The more common ways to metaphorically say "there are too many ...


6

おでん is name of a Japanese dish, which is made of daikon, fishcakes, konnyaku, kombu, etc., stewed long time. So, the phrase is アツアツ + おでん + とか ... which literally means: アツアツ - very hot (熱々) おでん - the Oden itself. とか - "kind of" or "etc" so we get "Very hot Oden etc."


5

How about: ([今度]{こんど}から)[下]{した}の[名前]{なまえ}で[呼]{よ}んでもいいですか。(a little casual) 下の(お)名前で呼ばせてもらってもいいですか。/[構]{かま}いませんか。(more polite) 下のお名前で呼ばせていただいてもいいでしょうか。/よろしいでしょうか。(even more polite) etc...


5

I believe this is "comicalize", or to turn into a comic/manga. According to hatena.jp: 小説、アニメ、ゲーム、映画、ドラマなどをマンガ化すること。 小説化を意味する「ノベライズ」から派生した和製英語。


4

You can modify the "気にする人" part and say like this: 私は細かい事によく気がつく人だと思います。 Now this sounds positive and suitable for presenting yourself. And you can use a more neutral word 几帳面【きちょうめん】 (na-adjective): 私は几帳面な性格なので、細かい書類の管理や事務作業は得意です。


4

"Kishu busshin" and "Oni te hotoke kokoro" mean the same thing. The first uses Sino-Japanese pronunciations which might be hard to understand if you're hearing the word for the first time. The second uses native Japanese pronunciations, which would be easier to understand for a Japanese speaker. It would be like saying some complicated word formed from Latin ...


4

In Japanese the phrase 「頭にくる」 is an idiom used to mean "get angry." 「トサカにくる」 is a slang version of that that emphasizes just how cheesed off you are. トサカ (=鶏冠) is the red part at the top of a chicken/rooster's head. Notice how it goes up through the head and kind of flares out. Because of how silly the image is, though, you'd use it at a time when a kind of ...


4

Where to start... 「どうしても」, in this context, means "no matter what". The nuance is "One has no choice but to ~~." This is an extremely common phrase. Regarding the "triple" negative, it is only "double" at best in reality. By the Japanese standard, it is actually only "single". 「[着]{き}なきゃだめなの」 Negative #1 = 着なきゃ, colloquial for 着なければ ("if I do ...


3

なの? is the plain form of ですか?, not a negative. どうしても can be understood as "no matter what" in this context. Is that enough to help you understand the meaning of the sentence?


3

Apparently the word is indeed derived from "hormone" (source) but in food context refers to dishes made from offal.


3

「その[足]{あし}を[縫]{ぬ}われたいか?」 means what it literally says. "Do you want your leg(s) to get sewed up?" What it is saying is "Do you want to get hurt in the legs so badly that you will need to have the cuts sewed up?"


2

まわりで: Oh this is ambiguous... I think the speaker wants to say 「俺のまわりで (literally, around me)」 here, but it can be taken in two opposite ways... "behind my back" or "clinging around me". I guess the former is the likely interpretation here because it is preceded by "こそこそ人のこと調べたり", but I'm not sure. ああだこうだと言う: (((ああ+だ)+(こう+だ))と言う). To say various trivial ...


2

I think I'd say it like... 細部に注意を払います。 Though maybe it'd be a little more humble to say it like... 細部に注意を払うように努めています。


2

When there is no copula and nothing seems to be omitted, as in your second example, I interpret the sentence as simply a fragment, used to "set the scene", and would translate it as such. It is very reminiscent of how fragments are used in descriptive passages in English: Pale druggists in remote towns of the Epworth League and flannel nightgown belts, ...


2

奥{おく} is the part far away from the "entrance" of a thing, so it could be translated by bottom or back for example depending of the type of object (e.g. a vase or a room). Or end in the case of a shelf ; it will most likely refer to the part the farther from the speaker / listener in this case. So 一番{いちばん}おく would indeed be the far end of the shelf here. ...


2

おく means the interior of something but is often used to mean "in the back". This is the use of 方 (ほう) meaning a direction. So put together you get something like "toward the deepest" part of the shelf, which you textbook has chosen to express as the "far end".


2

蘇る means "come to life again". 思い出の歌 means, a song that makes you nostalgic. So in this case, the nostalgic song which was shelved in his/her mind came to life again probably because he/she heard it again. "今も優しく" means "still tender" and この胸に roughly means "to my heart". I.e. "Still tender to my heart".


2

よう(だ) in this sentence is used to express inference based on reliable information (often based on what the speaker sees) or similarity. It is not the volitional form of a verb. You can translate it as "look like", "look as if", "seem", "be like", etc. It is often used with まるで which gives it more emphatic meaning "just like", "exactly as if". A verb can ...


2

Yours is good but the よろしいんですか part (which would mean "Are you saying you allow me to use your first name?") should be よろしいですか (though いいですか or よろしいでしょうか are better IMO). That said, 下の名前で呼ぶのはどうでしょうか? is probablly closer to what you want to say.


1

じいつ - じつ = realy くうだらない - くだらない = boring



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