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8

「[乞]{こ}い」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (continuative form) of the verb 「乞う」. It has absolutely nothing to do with "carp" the fish. 「乞い」 is a verb and it needs to be in that conjugation form in order to connect with the following word (another verb) 「[参]{まい}った」. 「[許]{ゆる}しを乞う」 is a set phrase meaning "to beg forgiveness". The 「に」 here means "in order to". ...


8

This sentence says "(I) will be fired in no more than 10 days." (time)と待たずに is a common set phrase which literally means "without waiting for (time)". This と is not "if" nor "then". The role of と here corresponds to the sixth entry of デジタル大辞泉's definition. 6 (数量を表す語に付き、打消しの表現を伴って)その範囲以上には出ない意を表す。…までも。「全部で一〇〇円―かからない」「一〇〇キロ―走らなかった」


7

This is basically, but certainly not exclusively, Western-Japan speech. 「よう」 = 「よく」 = "well" or "very well" in this context. It can also mean "often". This has nothing to do with 「ように」 or 「ような」, which means "like ~~", "as ~~", etc. 「わからん」 = 「わからない」 = "I don't get it.", "I don't understand.", etc. 「~~なんて」 = "stuff/thing/something like ~~". Think ...


7

I think these are the basic terms: American English is アメリカ英語. British English is イギリス英語. They're both types of 英語, just like American English and British English are both types of English. That doesn't mean no one ever puts it differently. You might find 米語 and 英語 used as short forms to refer to American and British English, for example. Here are ...


6

I will start by saying that Japanese-speakers do not say 「いいえ」 nearly as often as English-speakers say "No". 「いいえ」 is not an everyday word for many of us the same way "No" is for English-speakers. In Japanese, we answer questions negatively mainly by negating the main verb, adjective or noun used in the question itself. To the question "Wanna eat soba ...


6

Nine times out of ten, this sentence is based on 「あきらめたら、そこで試合終了ですよ」, which is a famous line from SLAM DUNK, a manga series featuring basketball: And the "official" English translation is "When you give up, that's when the game is over." This phrase is almost like a proverb, and used frequently at least by native Japanese speakers, even when they're ...


6

Sometimes the moral of a proverb could be vague and ambiguous. The author of this page believes that it tells people to "behave humbly", while this one argues that it means "wise people know how to let others' guard down", which is more or less faithful to what original hawks are said to do. There's also a QA forum answer gives an insight that "truly ...


6

The most natural translation (though not literal) would be 最終編集者 and 最終編集日/最終編集日時. You can also use 更新者 (updater) instead. 最終更新者: naruto 最終更新日時: 2015年5月21日 15:05 先の (=prior) would not work as you expect in this case.


6

「[写真]{しゃしん}があった[方]{ほう}があなたがどんな[人]{ひと}なのかわかるし、フレンドも[作]{つく}りやすくなります。」 is a perfectly normal sentence with a fairly simple sentence structure. It says "Condition A will bring Result #1 and Result #2". Condition A:「写真があった方が」 Result #1:「あなたがどんな人なのかわかる」 Result #2:「フレンドも作りやすくなる。」 In 「写真があった方が」, 「方」 is used to compare (implicitly) two situations. ...


5

While 名前 is the generic term for name, for inanimate objects, 名称【めいしょう】 is the word that sounds more formal and technical. For example you can say 船舶【せんぱく】の名称 or ソフトウェアの名称. Likewise, for names for people, 氏名【しめい】 is preferred on official application forms, etc.


5

For everyday use, it is definitely 「モンゴル」. I would be lying if I answered otherwise. 「モンゴル[国]{こく}」 sounds too formal for everyday use. 「モンゴリア」 is very rare despite what you have been told by that someone.


4

In this case, 「つめたい かぜの ふく」 is a noun modifier(1)(2) for 日. Basically, the verb clause the precedes the noun modifies it in a similar way to "that" in English. For example (from the references above): ボブは、いつも勉強する人だ。 = Bob is an always-does-studying person. = Bob is a person who always studies. In the same way, 「つめたい かぜの ふく」 is modifying 日. ...


4

You are on the right track. In this case, 「ある」 and 「ひ」 should be regarded as two independen words rather than 「あるひ」 split into two parts. 「ある」, all by itself, can mean "one ~~" or "a certain ~~" (and it is used at the beginning of virtually every children's story.) 「ある つめたい かぜの ふく ひ」 is a relative clause (not a sentence) in which both 「ある」 and ...


3

First, regarding the word 「みたく」, it is dialectal and fairly slangy. The majority of us native speakers do not use it actively. Those who do use it would tend to be from around Kanto and "not very old". If a J-learner wanted to use it, I feel s/he should use it knowing it is indeed that type of word so that it will not be used at the wrong places. 「みたく」 ...


3

As Keigh Rim pointed out, the description summarizes the contents of the book. The most notable event in the book is presumably when the sisters were almost eaten by a dragon. The なったり part carries the implication that there are other events besides this one that are also described in the book. Since translation is also the art of selectively choosing the ...


2

Actually, there is no definite way of "parsing" a sentence, i.e. distinguishing the components : it depends on the context. See for example this very funny twitter thread about the sentence, where native speakers try to find all possible interpretations : 頭{あたま}が赤{あか}い魚{さかな}を食{た}べた猫{ねこ} However, it should be obvious that in a given context, only one ...


2

It is used this way to mean like "session", "period", or (more limited) "service". My church (and others) in Japan counted their Sunday worship services this way: 一部礼拝 (1st Service)、二部礼拝 (2nd Service)、三部礼拝 (3rd Service)、 etc. BTW, did it really have ガーラズ for "garage"? It's usually written ガレージ.


2

My best guess with the 部 counter for this would be part one, part two, etc. According to jisho.org, 部 can also mean a "part; component; element" so in this context it would make sense to be Part one: girl band live, Part two: countdown live.


2

The second が in the snippet 岐阜県警が捜索したが見つからず is not the subject marker, but the conjunction particle が (which you could replace by け(れ)ど(も)) translating to "but": 岐阜県警が捜索したが見つからず Gifu Police searched [for the missing person], but not finding [him, had to call off the search the same evening...] I don't understand your "sentence segment", so I can't ...


2

It means "he meant to dip the string through that hole and fish". When the subject is 2nd or 3rd person, というのだ or ということだ work. Otherwise, it has to be ということだ only, i.e. you can't use というのだ for "I mean"(*) or "it means". (* Accurately, というのだ for "I mean" still works when you express your own action through other person's perspective.)


2

I would say If you were to come to Japan, you would be able to understand it better. The より attaches to 理解できる not to the V-たら construction. See: ...


2

「Word or phrase + [以前]{いぜん}の[問題]{もんだい}」 means "a matter to be considered prior to (word or phrase)". What that means is that there is an underlying matter which is more essential (and possibly more important) than the matter at hand. The sentence 「[作文]{さくぶん}が[上手]{じょうず}かどうかは、日本語[能力]{のうりょく}以前の問題である。」 suggests that whether or not one is good at writing ...


2

「[彼女]{かのじょ}の[物事]{ものごと}への[取]{と}り[組]{く}み[方]{かた}」 or 「彼女の物事の取り組み方」


2

It sounds like you're describing an アンケート. This is from French enquête, and I think it's usually translated into English as 'questionnaire' or 'survey'. If you mean a technical term for the actual HTML <form> element, then I think that would just be フォーム like you said.


2

It seems the words in parentheses are not directly related to the main sentence outside of them. And the words in parentheses are not strongly related with one another, either. It must be a very rhetorical expression, simulating random ideas pops one after another in the character's mind, disturbing her sleep. The author basically wanted you to be confused ...


1

This というが consists of the quotative particle と, the verb 言う (say), and the connector が (as/and/although). That part literally means "(they) say お客様は神様だ, and, ...", where "they" refers to the general public. In this context, the author says that お客様は神様 is a generally accepted idea, and then explains the spirit of that proverb. Note that that "and" should be ...


1

ゆっくり can be translated as "slowly" or "without rushing", according to jisho.org: ゆっくり slowly; at ease; restful (Onomatopoeic or mimetic word) ...and Wiktionary: ゆっくり (romaji yukkuri) slowly; at ease, without rushing, restfully If you're familiar with the "Yukkuri" internet meme, you've probably also seen it translated as ...


1

(In the first place, I don't think "in Japanese, the passive voice leaves the focus of the action on the person performing the action" but on the recipient.) It doesn't only change focus or emphasis but also the meaning itself, in other words, 犬が食べられた doesn't mean "I ate a dog" or "a dog was eaten by me", but "they ate our dog", more accurately, "a dog in a ...


1

なんじ refers to a time of day. いつ is a generic "when". I see why you're confused, but いつ is going to be the more common in this context. なんじ is more of a fixed time of day as opposed to いつ, which is far more general. You can use なんじ, and it's not unnatural at all, but I think it reflects something of a "what time did you receive my text" rather than a "when ...



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