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11

Generally, the difference between a transitive phrase and ukemi transitive phrase is emphasis. For example: ① 田中さんが村田さんに他動詞の使い方を教えた。 ② 村田さんは田中さんに他動詞の使い方を教えられた。 ③ 村田さんは他動詞の使い方を田中さんから教わった。 The first sentence (transitive) is very much focused on 田中さん. 村田さん is only mentioned because he's involved with the action that 田中さん is performing. The second (ukemi) ...


9

A を B に is a common literary adverbial expression that means with A in/on B, literally or figuratively. In most cases you have a part of body in B, as 小銭を手に with coins in hand, 期待を胸に with expectation in chest (= heart), ドアを背に with door in back (= with back against the door), リュックを(背/肩)に with backpack on shoulder etc. But it's also frequently used with ...


9

When used on their own, 始める and 出す are always transitive. However, when used as an auxiliary verb, 始める and 出す will always be used instead of their intransitive counterparts. The main verb, the verb that this helping verb attaches to, is the real determiner of transitivity. Transitivity has nothing to do with the auxiliary verb. For example, because 降る is ...


8

Another way to think of を in this sense is to do some action which "leaves something behind you", either literally or figuratively. Here are some additional examples: 公園を散歩する → Walk (through) the park; the park is "behind" you after you've walked through it. 家を出る → Leave home; home is now "behind" you in your time-line of activities 階段を下りる → Go ...


8

It's both. My copy of Kōjien has entries for both the transitive and intransitive uses of this verb. Intransitive 夕日が部屋に差し込む。 (ゆうひがへやにさしこむ。) 潮が差す。 (しおがさす。) Transitive 傘を差す。 (かさをさす。) 会話に水を差す。 (かいわにみずをさす。)


7

What's the deal with these triplets? Why are there two accepted verbs of one form for the same meaning? Are they somehow different? Yes, their usage is slightly different. A web article below well answers your question: Coexistent transitive verbs : "Tsunagu" and "Tsunageru" http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/110004672022 For '繋げる/繋ぐ' case: '繋ぐ' refers to ...


7

This is one of those instances where we as English speakers encounter a term and assume that it matches its English equivalent perfectly, but actually the distinction between transitive and intransitive verbs is a little bit fuzzier than you may have been led to believe. As such this answer may not be very intuitive. The basic point is that taking a direct ...


7

して has been omitted from 〜を〜に(して): わたしがゴミ袋を手に(して)立ち上がる して is often omitted from this construction. In this case, we can tell it's omitted for two reasons: The following verb is intransitive and can't take an を-argument. ゴミ袋を and 手に don't make sense as arguments of 立ち上がる here. So the key isn't the meaning of the verb, but the ellipsis of する.


7

From Samuel Martin's Reference Grammar of Japanese (1975), p.191: The intransitive verb 向く【むく】 means 'faces, fronts on' or 'is suitable for, suits' with N に; but with N を it is a quasi-intransitive verb of motion meaning 'turn (one's face) toward)' [...] He gives these examples: 横【よこ】を向いて【むいて】 turn to the side 前【まえ】を向いて【むいて】 turn to the ...


7

You're right, there has to be an actor and there is. The same actor as for 招く earlier in the sentence. 阿波踊りとは、徳島県を発祥とする盆踊りです。日本三大盆踊りで、日本の伝統芸能の一つとして、日本全国からたくさんの観客が訪れます。 その阿波踊りが、フランスのパリで初めて開催されました。このイベントは、日本在住のフランス人ジャーナリストが阿波踊りを自分の国に届けたい思いで、10年かけて実らせました。 パリでは、大人から子供まで阿波踊りの魅力を味わうことができ、会場は熱気に包まれたそうです。 来年は、踊り子300人をフランスに招いて、阿波踊りの魅力をもっと広めていくようです。 (...


7

As you can see here, 吹く can be transitive and intransitive. 風が吹く(自動詞) 笛を吹く(他動詞) So 風が強く吹いている。 can translate to "(lit.) The wind is blowing hard." i.e. "It's blowing hard."


7

There's a difference between intransitive and indirect. Transitivity (from Latin "transire", "to go across") basically (with exceptions, probably) implies the subject carrying out an action on an object that is generally distinct from the subject. Sure, you can select 自分 as the object to make the action reflexive, but in general you are able to select ...


6

i was taught that verbs are either transitive or intransitive. That is unfortunate, because the claim is misleading as long as Japanese is concerned. Unlike English, Japanese does not have a strict distinction between transitive and intransitive verbs. Although some people categorize the verbs which can be used with ~を as transitive verbs and the other ...


6

I think the difference is that 習う、学ぶ can be done by yourself, whereas 教わる can't be done just by yourself: you need someone (or something) else to teach you. Note that 教わる is "to be taught." When you say 授業で教わる you implicitly mean that you were taught by a teacher. On the other hand, you aren't implying that you were taught by someone in 授業で学ぶ In ...


5

終わる is used both as a transitive verb and an intransitive verb, whereas 終える is used only as a transitive verb. When 終わる is used as a transitive verb, it is almost synonymous to 終える. The only exception I can think of is that a closing word of a speech or other verbal communication is usually …を終わります instead of …を終えます.


5

(The question was already essentially answered in comments by Chocolate and me, but I am posting an answer as an answer.) To answer the question literally, 試験に受かる (to pass an examination) is grammatical, but 試験が受かる is not grammatical, as Chocolate stated in her comment. But a more interesting part comes from your logic based on which you thought that ...


5

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/ti_list.html Has a good list of them, in case you wanted to see them at a glance. Nothing I could find gave a good reason for it. Probably the language just evolved organically, as they tend to do. Of course, linguists will try to explain anything, so I'm not surprised that Japanese paper is so hard to digest. ...


5

The pair 預ける・預かる is actually not irregular at all: it belongs to a class of verbs of conveying (mostly giving and saying) that behaves differently in this regard in many languages. To see that we have to look at the relations between transitive and intransitive verbs (as well as passive and active verbs) from a linguistic point of view - this is something ...


5

I think the following are all valid 剣道で頑張って Do your best (while) at Kendo (practice) 剣道は頑張って Do your best for Kendo (generally) 剣道を頑張って Do your best in Kendo The last two are equivalent up to the difference in nuance between は and を. Of course all could be used in the same situation. The difference in usage is probably biggest between the first and the ...


5

I think イグサという植物の茎を編んで is an adjunct that tells us how the main clause verb 作られています happens. That is, it's similar to the English: tatami-omote is made [by weaving rush stalks] Note that the English has one passive (is made) and one non-finite verb (weaving). It corresponds fairly well to the Japanese, in which 作られている is passive and 編んで is non-finite....


5

As choco writes, “吹く” can be used in both ways of transitive and intransitive as a verb, though I think it’s more often used in a transitive than in intransitive form. Here are some examples I picked up at random: (Transitive): 笛を吹く- play the flute 埃を吹く- blow the dust off [法螺]{ほら}を吹く- talk big 毛を吹いて傷を求める - suffer great damage by sticking to a trivial ...


5

This is an example of a [自他]{じ・た} pair. These pairs are an important concept to learn in Japanese because there are a ton of them! [Here]{LLLL} [are]{LLL} [several]{LLLLLLL} [resources]{LLLLLLLLL} with lots of examples and good explanations. 折る is a [他動詞]{た・どう・し} which is a transitive verb. This means an external agent/influence performs the action in ...


5

Both sentences are correct and the same in meaning, but sentence B is far more common and sounds natural. For some reason, some Japanese verbs intrinsically have passive meanings, and they are used more commonly than the transitive verb + ~れる/られる version. See the following question for the list of such verbs. Other uses of the combined particle には This ...



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