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10

Think of it as through. 空をゆく 'go through the sky' ジャングルを行く 'go through a jungle' 歴史街道を行く 'go through a historic street' 一歩先を行く 'go through (a path) one step ahead' 私の道を行く 'go through my own way' 晴れの日を来る 'come through a sunny day (atmosphere)' 遠い道を来る 'come through a long road'


7

Generally, the difference between a transitive phrase and ukemi transitive phrase is emphasis. For example: ① 田中さんが村田さんに他動詞の使い方を教えた。 ② 村田さんは田中さんに他動詞の使い方を教えられた。 ③ 村田さんは他動詞の使い方を田中さんから教わった。 The first sentence (transitive) is very much focused on 田中さん. 村田さん is only mentioned because he's involved with the action that 田中さん is performing. The second (ukemi) ...


6

It's both. My copy of Kōjien has entries for both the transitive and intransitive uses of this verb. Intransitive 夕日が部屋に差し込む。 (ゆうひがへやにさしこむ。) 潮が差す。 (しおがさす。) Transitive 傘を差す。 (かさをさす。) 会話に水を差す。 (かいわにみずをさす。)


6

Another way to think of を in this sense is to do some action which "leaves something behind you", either literally or figuratively. Here are some additional examples: 公園を散歩する → Walk (through) the park; the park is "behind" you after you've walked through it. 家を出る → Leave home; home is now "behind" you in your time-line of activities 階段を下りる → Go ...


5

Although it is usually the transitive verb that takes a "Noun + を" in front of it, there is an important exception to this general rule. Intransitive verbs such as 向く、[走]{はし}る (to run)、[飛]{と}ぶ (to fly)、[出]{で}る (to get out), etc. can take a "Noun + を" when it describes the place of an action or the direction of a movement. 上を向く = to look upward ...


5

終わる is used both as a transitive verb and an intransitive verb, whereas 終える is used only as a transitive verb. When 終わる is used as a transitive verb, it is almost synonymous to 終える. The only exception I can think of is that a closing word of a speech or other verbal communication is usually …を終わります instead of …を終えます.


5

i was taught that verbs are either transitive or intransitive. That is unfortunate, because the claim is misleading as long as Japanese is concerned. Unlike English, Japanese does not have a strict distinction between transitive and intransitive verbs. Although some people categorize the verbs which can be used with ~を as transitive verbs and the ...


5

A general answer: The definition of intransitive is the negation of transitive. Logically, a verb is either intransitive or transitive; there is no other possibility. You may say that a verb becomes either of them depending on its usage, but a verb is never "neither intransitive nor transitive". In this particular case, を is not allowed in the kind of ...


4

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/ti_list.html Has a good list of them, in case you wanted to see them at a glance. Nothing I could find gave a good reason for it. Probably the language just evolved organically, as they tend to do. Of course, linguists will try to explain anything, so I'm not surprised that Japanese paper is so hard to digest. ...


4

The pair 預ける・預かる is actually not irregular at all: it belongs to a class of verbs of conveying (mostly giving and saying) that behaves differently in this regard in many languages. To see that we have to look at the relations between transitive and intransitive verbs (as well as passive and active verbs) from a linguistic point of view - this is something ...


4

I think the following are all valid 剣道で頑張って Do your best (while) at Kendo (practice) 剣道は頑張って Do your best for Kendo (generally) 剣道を頑張って Do your best in Kendo The last two are equivalent up to the difference in nuance between は and を. Of course all could be used in the same situation. The difference in usage is probably biggest between the first and the ...


4

Historically, Japanese has had several morphemes that change the transitivity of a verb. Most of these pairs involved lexicalised combinations of some verb with one of these morphemes. The morphemes are: -(a)su - causative. You can see it in words like ゆらす ('cause to shake', compare ゆれる 'shake'). -(a)ru - passive, or rather, general agent deletion ...


3

You are wrong. They do take を. ラップでごはんを包む 知識を役に立てる One tricky thing is that, 知識を役に立てる is derived from 知識が役に立つ, and the reason 知識 takes を in the former is not because it is the (underlying) direct object, but because of what is technically called exceptional case marking. As for how to learn them, that is too vague a question here. An ironical ...


3

It's true that 〜(ら)れる is often referred to as a "passive" form because that's one of its main uses, but it has other uses as well. They can be divided into four categories: 受身 - passive (most common) 可能 - potential 尊敬 - honorific 自発 - spontaneous (least common) This is an example of the potential use of 〜(ら)れる, here inflected to the negative 〜れない, ...


2

My initial perception (that I had before asking this question) also dealt with the focus of the sentence. With the 教えられる/教わる example, they both essentially mean "X was taught", but the X is different with each one. 学生は日本語を教わった - The students were taught Japanese (The subject the students were taught was Japanese) 学生は日本語を教えられた - The students were ...


2

So, we have two classes of verbs, 自動詞 and 他動詞, the so-called intransitive and transitive. The problem lies in the absence of mapping between the grammatical notions in both languages. I believe that you can be transitive and 自動詞. The only difference is that the particle used for the object will be が instead of を. For me, the verb 分かる is a transitive 自動詞, ...


2

Looking at this dictionary reference, it seems like the times where 終わる might be used like a transitive verb would be when one is putting an end to something. For example:  これで私のスピーチを終わります。 Or another example (according to "bridge road hight"さん in this answer,) : 「授業を終わる」→先生(講師)側 「授業を終える」→生徒(受講者)側 Basically, a teacher might say something like ...


2

The verb 浴びる expresses something like be showered with [DirectObject]. Common literal uses include liquids such as water (水を、シャワーを) and rays of light (光を、日光を、月光を、日差しを), although it can be used with anything you can be showered by. It doesn't need to be translated as showered by, though; 月光を浴びた could be bathed in moonlight, basked in the moonlight, etc. ...


1

(This is just a supplementary note to compliment the answer above) 向く is an interesting case (see below) but generally when an intransitive verb takes を the English equivalent often contains an additional word: You fly across the sky.-> 空を飛ぶ You run along a road-> 道を走る You stroll around a park -> 公園を散歩する You go out of a house -> 家を出る You feel sad about ...


1

(My answer partly builds off of Siveru's answer.) The Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar (DBJG) gives an appendix (number 3) of intransitive/transitive patterns which probably includes all the pairs you have been given plus a few more. When I first began to study I was able to learn the pairs in my text book but found the appendix a bit too much. ...


1

I do not have a firm hold on what is going on in these sentences, but here are some observation and speculation. As for タクシーが街を流す, as I wrote in a comment on the question, I observe that the structure of the sentence is quite similar to 陸上選手が100メートルを流す. The latter 流す means something like “exercise lightly,” which I feel some connection to the meaning of ...


1

You are confused by the translation. (I didn't realize the translation can be so confusing in the site.) [a] (人に)電話をかける。 "put in a call to ~" Here "~" is 人 [b] ~が(主語に)電話をかける。 "receive a telephone call from" Here the part before に is the subject(主語) of the translation. So "~" is the part after "from" : "主語 receive a telephone call from ~" So you ...


1

There are a few of these uses that I'm not familiar with, but the uses I do know all look ok to me (yes meaning both transitive/intransitive forms ok). Sorry this is not a complete answer: Yes Yes Yes Yes - I've never heard it used with necklace, but definitely with megane. Yes not familiar with this usage Yes not familiar with this usage Yes Yes (9 & ...



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