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8

Yes. You can address any day of the week by its first kanji, and you can refer to it in short using the respective onyomi. For example, you can say 月{げつ}水{すい}金{きん}はお休みです。 In fact you often hear the weekend referred to as (きん)どにち. You can also go half way and abbreviate it just to ◯曜, as in 日曜. Outside of spoken language you see the kanji used to represent ...


7

I believe you are making the mistake of attempting to replicate an English pattern in Japanese. As snailboat points out, the idiomatic equivalent is as follows: 泥棒はいつまでたっても泥棒。/三つ子の魂百まで。/性格を変えることはできない。 And if you make this search, http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Once+a+always+a one finds that the nearest Japanese equivalent seems to be: noun ...


4

Aside from the fact that "bike's time" and "Anna's time" don't make even sense in English (except for a very small set of contexts), I can't think of many scenarios where you'd use "possessive" time except for the following. And generally 時間 refers to the amount of time or the specific time of something, so it wouldn't always be interchangeable with とき ...


4

According to Japan Meteorological Agency, by definition, "AのちB" stands for "A for the first half (of the period being forecasted), then B for the latter half." http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/kishou/know/faq/faq10.html Obviously the actual time depends on the "forecast period". Unless otherwise specified, "weather reports for tomorrow" on evening TV shows refer ...


3

平成 will last until the Emperor's death. So, until that happens, every future year is stated as 平成. If he were to pass away, then there would be a new name decided upon, and that year would be the final year of 平成 (up to day of his death) and the [元年]{がんねん} of the next era (starting from the day after his death). Once the change happens, obviously any ...



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