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8

Yes. You can address any day of the week by its first kanji, and you can refer to it in short using the respective onyomi. For example, you can say 月{げつ}水{すい}金{きん}はお休みです。 In fact you often hear the weekend referred to as (きん)どにち. You can also go half way and abbreviate it just to ◯曜, as in 日曜. Outside of spoken language you see the kanji used to represent ...


5

By far the most common way of expressing that would be to use 「この」 as in 「この1時間」、「この1ヶ月(間)」、「この1年(間)」, etc. Some natural ways to say "I spent the past hour studying Japanese." for us native speakers are:  「日本語の勉強にこの1時間をかけました。」  「この1時間を日本語の勉強に[充]{あ}てました。」  「この1時間をかけて日本語を勉強しました。」  「この1時間をかけて日本語の勉強をしました。」


5

Earthliŋ has already provided a great answer, so instead of repeating what they've got, I figure I'll just fill out the information as it relates to the phrases presented in the question -- ways of saying it without 一【いち】, basically, and how natural they may or may not be. I did a few Google searches for various phrases (putting "quotes" around the terms to ...


5

The main point for saying "rough [time]" is that you should express [time] as a proper time period. (one) day 一日【いちにち】 (one) month [一ヶ月]{いっかげつ} (one) year 一年【いちねん】 (Cf., 良い一日を "Have a nice day".) 大変な一日だった/でした is I think common for "I had a rough day". 大変な一年 works similarly. 難しい一年 works as well, although it's more like "difficult year" than "rough ...


4

According to Japan Meteorological Agency, by definition, "AのちB" stands for "A for the first half (of the period being forecasted), then B for the latter half." http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/kishou/know/faq/faq10.html Obviously the actual time depends on the "forecast period". Unless otherwise specified, "weather reports for tomorrow" on evening TV shows refer ...


4

Aside from the fact that "bike's time" and "Anna's time" don't make even sense in English (except for a very small set of contexts), I can't think of many scenarios where you'd use "possessive" time except for the following. And generally 時間 refers to the amount of time or the specific time of something, so it wouldn't always be interchangeable with とき ...


3

How about ここ in this case? 「ここ一時間ぐらいずっと勉強してた。」 「ここ数日ずっと忙しかった。」 「ここ2週間海外にいた。」


3

平成 will last until the Emperor's death. So, until that happens, every future year is stated as 平成. If he were to pass away, then there would be a new name decided upon, and that year would be the final year of 平成 (up to day of his death) and the [元年]{がんねん} of the next era (starting from the day after his death). Once the change happens, obviously any ...


3

In addition to the two existing answers, you could also say しんどい一年 or きつい一年.


1

Causality In broad terms, I've noticed three kinds of constructions that loosely correlate to "if / then". The main differences between these appear to be differences in emphasis and causal relationship. 行くと XX Tells us whenever someone goes, XX happens. XX is an inevitable consequence of the verb. 行けば XX Tells us that only if someone goes, XX happens. ...


1

They could all be translated to 'when' in English but: AとB in this case indicates that A first happens, then immediately after B happens. This is the case in your example! たら can have more uncertainty in it, i.e. it can be used to express sentences where you'd use 'if' in English. I think of とき as 'the time when' or 'everytime when'. Just offering my two ...



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