Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Past Perspective: Formal As usual, expect to hear lots of "on" sounds. Preceding time: 「[前]{ぜん} + time word」 [前年]{ぜんねん}、[前月]{ぜんげつ}、[前週]{ぜんしゅう}、[前日]{ぜんじつ} Succeeding time: 「[翌]{よく} + time word」  [翌年]{よくねん}、[翌月]{よくげつ}, etc. Informal That means lots of "kun" sounds. Preceding time: 「(その)[前]{まえ}の + time word」 (その)[前]{まえ}の[年]{とし}、[前]{まえ}の[月]{つき}, ...


5

It all depends the numbers immediately preceding 「分」. 「ふん Hun」: 2, 5, 7, 9 and 00. 「ぷん Pun」: 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, etc. Examples: 「ふん Hun」: 32分(さんじゅうにふん)、15分(じゅうごふん)、57分(ごじゅうななふん)、9分(きゅうふん)、4-5分(しごふん [Only number 5, not number 4, affects the way 分 is pronounced.]) 「ぷん Pun」: ...


5

分 isn't only used for "minutes", but also for "parts". For example, fractions are read ⅓ 三分の一 さんぶん の いち lit. one of three parts When 3分 means "three parts", it is always read さんぶん, not さんぷん. When 3分 means "three minutes", it is always read さんぷん, not さんぶん. Similarly, よんぷん = "four minutes" and よんぶん = "four parts". さんふん and よんふん are non-standard ...


5

There actually is a rule governing the "Noun + Adjective" structures. The noun must signify either a spatial or temporal unit such as [朝]{あさ}、[夜]{よる}、[空]{そら}、[天]{てん}、[奥]{おく}, [時]{とき}, [数]{かず}, etc. The adjective must signify a degree or quantity regarding the preceding noun. These include ...


5

You are making a mistake lots of people make – you are trying to think about what your sentence will look like in English. You might do this with most European languages, but you definitively can't do this with Asian languages. So as you said, your first sentence is correct: 金曜日にケーキを食べる. Basically, all you did in your second sentence was indicate that ...


5

There is no idiomatic way other than saying 「~の[年]{とし}」. The 「~[年]{どし}」 pattern basically only applies to the 12 zodiac years. There are however a handful of non-zodiac words you can find in a dictionary, including [厄年]{やくどし}, [当]{あ}たり[年]{どし} ("year of plenty") or [閏年]{うるうどし} ("leap year"), but any of them is associated with or based on some periodic yearly ...


4

The idiomatic way of saying "This was the year of ~" is "今年は~の年だった". Dropping "の" sounds very weird. And if this Selfie refers to a self-portrait, セルフィー is more natural. 年末を迎えてメディアが指摘しているのが、2013年が "The Year of The Selfie"、すなわち セルフィーの年だったということ。 (http://www.cubeny.com/catch12-3-13.htm)


3

There are a few ways to express this. You can use 翌{よく} as in: 翌年{よくとし}(orよくねん) 翌月{よくげつ} 翌週{よくしゅう} 翌日{よくじつ} These means year, month, week, day, following a particular point in time. Other ways are to use 次の〇 or 前の〇 as in: 次{つぎ}の年{とし} or 前{まえ}の年{とし} (前年{ぜんねん} for more of a 熟語{じゅくご} feel)


3

If it were me, I would say 今日から二週間後[に]、東京へ行く。 I don't think 後 is usually considered a particle (助詞). 二週間 = a duration of two weeks. So you need to express after that duration has passed.


3

It means kind of "tomorrow or the next day", accurately "tomorrow or another day if you can't afford tomorrow".


2

I think '明日あたり' is more widely used but same meaning. 明日 and 明日あたり are different. 明日 == tomorrow 明日あたり == tomorrow but with some tolerance. It means a day after tomorrow is possible option. But not today. Because most people know today's own schedule. 25日あたり == In general, 24, 25 or 26 if today is not 24.


2

Nuance "時間も時間だし" "(今の)時間も(___の)時間だし" Example "時間も時間だし、家に帰ろう。" "(今の)時間も(門限の)時間だし、家に帰ろう。" "it's about time, so curfew. Let's go back home." "Now Time is a time of curfew. Let's go back home." <- Nuance I apologize if there are any mistakes in my English writing.


1

Rarely, yes. なる in your examples are all punctual usage and these なっている represent a resutative aspect. ①(もう)暗くなっている。 (The weather) has become already dark. ② 医者になっている。 (He/She) has become a doctor. ③ この部隊はXの指揮下になっている。This unit is in X's command. However, durative usage is possible when the subject is plural or collective, because collection of punctual ...


1

I think the difference has more to do with semantics rather than specific words or phrasing. Even in English, we say "I was sick, but I got better", to imply that being "well" is the normal state, probably because being sick in prolonged state is not commonly seen, but if you wanted to, you could also use the same exact wording to indicate recovering from a ...


1

なんじ refers to a time of day. いつ is a generic "when". I see why you're confused, but いつ is going to be the more common in this context. なんじ is more of a fixed time of day as opposed to いつ, which is far more general. You can use なんじ, and it's not unnatural at all, but I think it reflects something of a "what time did you receive my text" rather than a "when ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible