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8

(Turning my own comment above into an answer. There will, however, be no references provided as OP requests. Everything I state here comes directly from my head as an average Japanese-speaker.) First off, I would like to make it clear that this is not a question of nuance. This is a question of what I might call the "practical and intentional reading/...


5

They're both correct, it just depends on the context in which the sentence appears. For example, if it were in a speech you would most likely say: 日本に行った時、新幹線に乗りませんでした。 However, perhaps in casual conversation with a friend you'd be more inclined to say: 日本に行った時、新幹線に乗らなかった。 Hope that helps!


5

You have a choice; You can say it with or without 「は」. The more informal the speech, the more often the 「は」 is dropped. The only situation in which 「は」 is not optional and it must be used is when you talk about what someone ate/will eat this morning in comparison to what he ate/will eat on another day. That is always 「けさは」 as 「けさ」in those cases is an ...


4

For the first four (or, for "for X years / months / days / minutes / seconds"), I would use 「~[間]{かん}」, or just a counter such as 年, ヶ月, 日, 分 with no suffix (~間), or 「~の[間]{あいだ}」 depending on context, as in: アメリカに{[10年間]{じゅうねんかん} / 10年}住んでいます。 I have lived in the US for 10 years. (or アメリカに{[住]{す}んで / 住み[始]{はじ}めて}10年になります。 It's been 10 years since I ...


4

No, you won't see any case particle after following words, official or not, as long as they're used to indicate the time when the sentence takes place on/in, because they are completely adverbial in this usage. 昨日, 今日, 明日 etc. 先週, 今週, 来週 etc. 先月, 今月, 来月 etc. 前期, 今期, 来期 etc. 去年, 今年, 来年 etc. 今朝, 明朝, 昨晩, 今晩, 今夜 etc. 6時に荷物が届きそうだ。 夕方(に)荷物が届きそうだ。 今晩(× に)...


4

As the other poster has said, you're using とき correctly. "When Sara and her dad were escaping Texas," -> 「サラと(サラの)お父さんが(いっしょに)テキサスから逃げるとき、/ テキサスを[脱出]{だっしゅつ}するとき、」 "because the people thought they were zombies" ->「 [人々]{ひとびと}は[二人]{ふたり}をゾンビだと[思]{おも}ったので、」 (lit. Because the people thought the two were zombies) or more naturally: -> 「二人は(人々にor[民衆]{みんしゅう}に)...


3

Keep in mind that the kanji 間 will drastically change the meaning. 2015年に: "in (the year) 2015" 2015年間に: "during the 2015 years" 2015年の時に: would mean "during the time of (the year) 2015", but redundant and uncommon 2015年間の時に: would mean "during the time of 2015 years", but redundant and uncommon The latter two may appear in poems and lyrics, but in ...


3

As you said 二〇一五年間の時に is unnatural. If you say "during the year of 2015", you say 二〇一五年に,二〇一五年の時に in Japanese but 二〇一五年間に is unnatural because 二〇一五年間 means "for two thousand and fifteen years".


3

To work from the information given both in your question and comment above, the following could logically be said: "What event does それから refer to?" 「それ」 must refer to "event A", to use your own words. 「それから」 = "since event A (occured)" "Is it saying that the time when Maruko got out of the bath etc was one hour after event A?" Exactly. Notice ...


2

Two other ways to say this: 二週間したら東京へ行く。 二週間[経]{た}ったら東京へ行く。 The verb する in the first one is roughly equivalent to the verb 経つ in the second one, and both mean "to pass time".


2

As a nuance, 一時(いちじ) means tentative or temporary, like: [一時的]{いちじてき}[措置]{そち} - tentative measure 一時[立替]{たてかえ} - temporary financing 一時的[避難]{ひなん} - temporary evacuation 一時(いっとき)means momentary or transient, like: [一時]{いっとき}の[憩]{いこ}い - a short break [訊]{き}くは[一時]{いっとき}の恥、訊かぬは一生の恥 - It's a momentary shame for you to ask a question,...


2

It is 「この[一]{いち}[年半]{ねんはん}」. You cannot add 「[間]{かん}」 to it, but you can 「の[間]{あいだ}」. The "rule" is that we just cannot say 「~~[半間]{はんかん}」. Correct:: 「この1年半」、「この1年半の[間]{あいだ}」、「この2[週間半]{しゅうかんはん}(の[間]{あいだ})」, etc. Incorrect: 「この一年半[間]{かん}」、「この2週間半[間]{かん}」, etc. 「この」 can, of course, be replaced by 「その」 or 「あの」 depending on the context.


2

The past-tense ~た時 pattern is used when the action is completed relative to the main clause. The present-tense ~る時 pattern is used when the action has not yet been completed relative to the main clause. A common example to illustrate the difference: 日本に行くとき、カメラを買った。 On the way to Japan, I bought a camera. (The action of "going" isn't complete yet.) ...


1

Legal Answer: 12:00 in 24h can be only written as 午前12時, and therefore 12:30 in 24h might be 午前12時30分, because it's defined so by an ancient Japanese law (in 1872), which somehow seems to be still in effect. There is no such thing as officially-defined 午後0時. (EDIT: As @broccoriforest says, perhaps the more accurate way to describe this situation is: "Time ...


1

The most technically correct answer would be... both 午前12時30分 and 午後12時30分 are nonexistent. Because if you apply 12-hour notation rigidly, the time range only varies from 0:00 to 12:00 (whether the end is included or not is still debatable). Hence the value 12:30 a.m/p.m are simply not allowed. That said, in daily life we could understand it by considering ...


1

The concept of a day is quite ambiguous in any language and Japanese is no exception. A day can be: 24 hours, a calendar day, a period between sunrise and sunset, a period between you wake up and go to sleep, one's workday. One day might have more than 24 hours (長い一日だった), the other less... That said 一日{いちにち} in your example refers to a time period that ...


1

一日 means either the first day of the month or one day, but can also mean all day. In that context, 一日 is used to denote that the whole day will be beautiful. Anyone please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm still learning myself.


1

Rarely, yes. なる in your examples are all punctual usage and these なっている represent a resutative aspect. ①(もう)暗くなっている。 (The weather) has become already dark. ② 医者になっている。 (He/She) has become a doctor. ③ この部隊はXの指揮下になっている。This unit is in X's command. However, durative usage is possible when the subject is plural or collective, because collection of punctual ...



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