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6

(Turning my own comment above into an answer. There will, however, be no references provided as OP requests. Everything I state here comes directly from my head as an average Japanese-speaker.) First off, I would like to make it clear that this is not a question of nuance. This is a question of what I might call the "practical and intentional ...


5

You are making a mistake lots of people make – you are trying to think about what your sentence will look like in English. You might do this with most European languages, but you definitively can't do this with Asian languages. So as you said, your first sentence is correct: 金曜日にケーキを食べる. Basically, all you did in your second sentence was indicate that ...


5

If it were me, I would say 今日から二週間後[に]、東京へ行く。 I don't think 後 is usually considered a particle (助詞). 二週間 = a duration of two weeks. So you need to express after that duration has passed.


5

They're both correct, it just depends on the context in which the sentence appears. For example, if it were in a speech you would most likely say: 日本に行った時、新幹線に乗りませんでした。 However, perhaps in casual conversation with a friend you'd be more inclined to say: 日本に行った時、新幹線に乗らなかった。 Hope that helps!


3

Keep in mind that the kanji 間 will drastically change the meaning. 2015年に: "in (the year) 2015" 2015年間に: "during the 2015 years" 2015年の時に: would mean "during the time of (the year) 2015", but redundant and uncommon 2015年間の時に: would mean "during the time of 2015 years", but redundant and uncommon The latter two may appear in poems and lyrics, but in ...


3

As you said 二〇一五年間の時に is unnatural. If you say "during the year of 2015", you say 二〇一五年に,二〇一五年の時に in Japanese but 二〇一五年間に is unnatural because 二〇一五年間 means "for two thousand and fifteen years".


3

It means kind of "tomorrow or the next day", accurately "tomorrow or another day if you can't afford tomorrow".


3

To work from the information given both in your question and comment above, the following could logically be said: "What event does それから refer to?" 「それ」 must refer to "event A", to use your own words. 「それから」 = "since event A (occured)" "Is it saying that the time when Maruko got out of the bath etc was one hour after event A?" Exactly. Notice ...


2

I think '明日あたり' is more widely used but same meaning. 明日 and 明日あたり are different. 明日 == tomorrow 明日あたり == tomorrow but with some tolerance. It means a day after tomorrow is possible option. But not today. Because most people know today's own schedule. 25日あたり == In general, 24, 25 or 26 if today is not 24.


2

Two other ways to say this: 二週間したら東京へ行く。 二週間[経]{た}ったら東京へ行く。 The verb する in the first one is roughly equivalent to the verb 経つ in the second one, and both mean "to pass time".


1

The past-tense ~た時 pattern is used when the action is completed relative to the main clause. The present-tense ~る時 pattern is used when the action has not yet been completed relative to the main clause. A common example to illustrate the difference: 日本に行くとき、カメラを買った。 On the way to Japan, I bought a camera. (The action of "going" isn't complete yet.) ...


1

I think the difference has more to do with semantics rather than specific words or phrasing. Even in English, we say "I was sick, but I got better", to imply that being "well" is the normal state, probably because being sick in prolonged state is not commonly seen, but if you wanted to, you could also use the same exact wording to indicate recovering from a ...


1

間 stands for "while," "during." So it stands to reason that you use it with a verb indicating some duration, as in 居る間, 出かけている間 (= while staying, while staying out). I would not say 出かける間, as I doubt 出かける is an action with duration. * Added the 21st June, 2015 * I have no ideal why someone downvoted my answer. I would like to stress that 出かける means ...


1

The concept of a day is quite ambiguous in any language and Japanese is no exception. A day can be: 24 hours, a calendar day, a period between sunrise and sunset, a period between you wake up and go to sleep, one's workday. One day might have more than 24 hours (長い一日だった), the other less... That said 一日{いちにち} in your example refers to a time period that ...


1

一日 means either the first day of the month or one day, but can also mean all day. In that context, 一日 is used to denote that the whole day will be beautiful. Anyone please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm still learning myself.


1

Rarely, yes. なる in your examples are all punctual usage and these なっている represent a resutative aspect. ①(もう)暗くなっている。 (The weather) has become already dark. ② 医者になっている。 (He/She) has become a doctor. ③ この部隊はXの指揮下になっている。This unit is in X's command. However, durative usage is possible when the subject is plural or collective, because collection of punctual ...


1

Yes, you can use 出かける間 from the moment when you try to leave home, to the moment when you get out. In addition, you can still use 出かけている間 for the same situation. The action in the main clause is done during that moment. e.g. 私がちょうど出かける間にネコに家に入られたようだ。(By the way, what the speaker in the first sentence is whining for, regaring taking picture?)


1

なんじ refers to a time of day. いつ is a generic "when". I see why you're confused, but いつ is going to be the more common in this context. なんじ is more of a fixed time of day as opposed to いつ, which is far more general. You can use なんじ, and it's not unnatural at all, but I think it reflects something of a "what time did you receive my text" rather than a "when ...



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