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7

Past Perspective: Formal As usual, expect to hear lots of "on" sounds. Preceding time: 「[前]{ぜん} + time word」 [前年]{ぜんねん}、[前月]{ぜんげつ}、[前週]{ぜんしゅう}、[前日]{ぜんじつ} Succeeding time: 「[翌]{よく} + time word」  [翌年]{よくねん}、[翌月]{よくげつ}, etc. Informal That means lots of "kun" sounds. Preceding time: 「(その)[前]{まえ}の + time word」 (その)[前]{まえ}の[年]{とし}、[前]{まえ}の[月]{つき}, ...


6

By far the most common way of expressing that would be to use 「この」 as in 「この1時間」、「この1ヶ月(間)」、「この1年(間)」, etc. Some natural ways to say "I spent the past hour studying Japanese." for us native speakers are:  「日本語の勉強にこの1時間をかけました。」  「この1時間を日本語の勉強に[充]{あ}てました。」  「この1時間をかけて日本語を勉強しました。」  「この1時間をかけて日本語の勉強をしました。」


6

The かん here is 間 in kanji, and this is used as a suffix to refer to a span of time. ろくしゅう in your sentence is spelled 六週 in kanji and means "six weeks", but in a way that is more ambiguous than the English. Various suffixes can be added on the end to make things more specific, like 目{め} to mean "the sixth week", or 分{ぶん} to indicate six weeks' worth of ...


6

Earthliŋ has already provided a great answer, so instead of repeating what they've got, I figure I'll just fill out the information as it relates to the phrases presented in the question -- ways of saying it without 一【いち】, basically, and how natural they may or may not be. I did a few Google searches for various phrases (putting "quotes" around the terms to ...


6

The main point for saying "rough [time]" is that you should express [time] as a proper time period. (one) day 一日【いちにち】 (one) month [一ヶ月]{いっかげつ} (one) year 一年【いちねん】 (Cf., 良い一日を "Have a nice day".) 大変な一日だった/でした is I think common for "I had a rough day". 大変な一年 works similarly. 難しい一年 works as well, although it's more like "difficult year" than "rough ...


5

There actually is a rule governing the "Noun + Adjective" structures. The noun must signify either a spatial or temporal unit such as [朝]{あさ}、[夜]{よる}、[空]{そら}、[天]{てん}、[奥]{おく}, [時]{とき}, [数]{かず}, etc. The adjective must signify a degree or quantity regarding the preceding noun. These include ...


5

分 isn't only used for "minutes", but also for "parts". For example, fractions are read ⅓ 三分の一 さんぶん の いち lit. one of three parts When 3分 means "three parts", it is always read さんぶん, not さんぷん. When 3分 means "three minutes", it is always read さんぷん, not さんぶん. Similarly, よんぷん = "four minutes" and よんぶん = "four parts". さんふん and よんふん are non-standard ...


5

It all depends the numbers immediately preceding 「分」. 「ふん Hun」: 2, 5, 7, 9 and 00. 「ぷん Pun」: 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, etc. Examples: 「ふん Hun」: 32分(さんじゅうにふん)、15分(じゅうごふん)、57分(ごじゅうななふん)、9分(きゅうふん)、4-5分(しごふん [Only number 5, not number 4, affects the way 分 is pronounced.]) 「ぷん Pun」: ...


5

There is no idiomatic way other than saying 「~の[年]{とし}」. The 「~[年]{どし}」 pattern basically only applies to the 12 zodiac years. There are however a handful of non-zodiac words you can find in a dictionary, including [厄年]{やくどし}, [当]{あ}たり[年]{どし} ("year of plenty") or [閏年]{うるうどし} ("leap year"), but any of them is associated with or based on some periodic yearly ...


4

The idiomatic way of saying "This was the year of ~" is "今年は~の年だった". Dropping "の" sounds very weird. And if this Selfie refers to a self-portrait, セルフィー is more natural. 年末を迎えてメディアが指摘しているのが、2013年が "The Year of The Selfie"、すなわち セルフィーの年だったということ。 (http://www.cubeny.com/catch12-3-13.htm)


4

In addition to the two existing answers, you could also say しんどい一年 or きつい一年.


3

How about ここ in this case? 「ここ一時間ぐらいずっと勉強してた。」 「ここ数日ずっと忙しかった。」 「ここ2週間海外にいた。」


3

There are a few ways to express this. You can use 翌{よく} as in: 翌年{よくとし}(orよくねん) 翌月{よくげつ} 翌週{よくしゅう} 翌日{よくじつ} These means year, month, week, day, following a particular point in time. Other ways are to use 次の〇 or 前の〇 as in: 次{つぎ}の年{とし} or 前{まえ}の年{とし} (前年{ぜんねん} for more of a 熟語{じゅくご} feel)


3

It means kind of "tomorrow or the next day", accurately "tomorrow or another day if you can't afford tomorrow".


2

I think '明日あたり' is more widely used but same meaning. 明日 and 明日あたり are different. 明日 == tomorrow 明日あたり == tomorrow but with some tolerance. It means a day after tomorrow is possible option. But not today. Because most people know today's own schedule. 25日あたり == In general, 24, 25 or 26 if today is not 24.


2

Nuance "時間も時間だし" "(今の)時間も(___の)時間だし" Example "時間も時間だし、家に帰ろう。" "(今の)時間も(門限の)時間だし、家に帰ろう。" "it's about time, so curfew. Let's go back home." "Now Time is a time of curfew. Let's go back home." <- Nuance I apologize if there are any mistakes in my English writing.


1

I think the difference has more to do with semantics rather than specific words or phrasing. Even in English, we say "I was sick, but I got better", to imply that being "well" is the normal state, probably because being sick in prolonged state is not commonly seen, but if you wanted to, you could also use the same exact wording to indicate recovering from a ...


1

Causality In broad terms, I've noticed three kinds of constructions that loosely correlate to "if / then". The main differences between these appear to be differences in emphasis and causal relationship. 行くと XX Tells us whenever someone goes, XX happens. XX is an inevitable consequence of the verb. 行けば XX Tells us that only if someone goes, XX happens. ...


1

They could all be translated to 'when' in English but: AとB in this case indicates that A first happens, then immediately after B happens. This is the case in your example! たら can have more uncertainty in it, i.e. it can be used to express sentences where you'd use 'if' in English. I think of とき as 'the time when' or 'everytime when'. Just offering my two ...



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