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17

We normally say [三十分]{さんじゅっぷん}. Some people say [半時間]{はんじかん}, but I think it's only used in Kansai area. 参考に・・→ OKWave「半時間って方言ですか」 P.S. I'm from Kyoto but actually I've never noticed any of my friends say 半時間... Most of them are in/from Kyoto, Osaka, or Shiga. I think it's more used by older people (probably in Osaka?), because the only two people I can ...


15

Yes, it is inclusive. All the similar phrases that use 以 are inclusive: 以内、以前、以上、以下、以来. However, unfortunately a lot of people do not know this and use them carelessly without thinking. If you wanted to express "After the 16th but not including it", you could say: 16日の翌日から参加できません。 However, I would be more inclined to say: 17日以降参加できません。


9

I think Hyperworm already did a good job of answering the question, so I'll just focus on saying "later"/"before". Adding 前{まえ} or 後{ご} after any of these to mean "a few ... ago" or "after a few ...", e.g. 数{すう}分{ふん}前{まえ} "a few minutes ago" or 数{すう}分{ふん}後{ご} "after a few minutes": 数{すう}秒{びょう}: "a few seconds" 数{すう}分{ふん}: "a few minutes" 数{すう}時{じ}間{かん}: ...


8

A quarter to three is 2時45分 (にじよんじゅうごふん), and a quarter past three is 3時15分 (さんじじゅうごふん). If we want to emphasize the difference from three o’clock, we can say “3時の15分前” and “3時の15分後,” but this is not the usual way to state the time.


8

本日 is keigo. You will hear this on a train or airplane, or in a store. But you won't be saying it yourself, unless if you as a beginning student are put in the unlikely position of making an official announcement to someone. 今日 is what you would use in ordinary situations.


8

Two constructions spring to mind here. 数{すう} can be used in place of a specific number, followed by a counter, to mean "some" / "a few" / "several" (it doesn't really make a distinction in this respect...). 数時間後、彼は試験を終わった。 This can be used in ways you might not expect: 数十秒 some tens of seconds 十数秒 ten-(and-some)-odd seconds (between 10 and 19) ...


8

"When did you last see her?" 最後に彼女を見たのはいつ(ですか)? "When did you last do the laundry?" 最後に洗濯をしたのはいつ(ですか)? "When did we last meet?" 最後に会ったのはいつ(ですか)? I think you can easily use 最後に to say "last" in this context.


8

Yes. You can address any day of the week by its first kanji, and you can refer to it in short using the respective onyomi. For example, you can say 月{げつ}水{すい}金{きん}はお休みです。 In fact you often hear the weekend referred to as (きん)どにち. You can also go half way and abbreviate it just to ◯曜, as in 日曜. Outside of spoken language you see the kanji used to represent ...


7

1時 means "one o'clock". 1時間 means "one hour". So you have to say 1時間15分掛かる。 If you want to express the "about", you can say およそ1時間15分掛かる。 or 1時間15分くらい掛かる。


7

I believe you are making the mistake of attempting to replicate an English pattern in Japanese. As snailboat points out, the idiomatic equivalent is as follows: 泥棒はいつまでたっても泥棒。/三つ子の魂百まで。/性格を変えることはできない。 And if you make this search, http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Once+a+always+a one finds that the nearest Japanese equivalent seems to be: noun ...


7

Never seen よーちぇん before but it must be a lazy pronunciation of 幼稚園{ようちえん} So: "I haven't forgotten it since kindergarten" And no context in the question but おらん will most likely be the negative of おる, yes.


6

I assume that it is a notice received from a library (please include the context in the question). The notice means that borrowing by you is suspended until Feb. 13, inclusive, and therefore you cannot check out library materials on Feb. 13. An example from Catch a Wave, April 13, 2012, via Space ALC: 毎年恒例のニューヨーク国際自動車ショーが今年は4月6日から15日まで開催されている。 The ...


6

The かん here is 間 in kanji, and this is used as a suffix to refer to a span of time. ろくしゅう in your sentence is spelled 六週 in kanji and means "six weeks", but in a way that is more ambiguous than the English. Various suffixes can be added on the end to make things more specific, like 目{め} to mean "the sixth week", or 分{ぶん} to indicate six weeks' worth of ...


5

Although 本日 will usually be too formal for most situations, there are many cases where you would use it over 今日 (with slightly different nuances). Typically when referring to something tied to the day's date: 本日の魚 (in a restaurant) 本日の会議 (in a professional context) etc.


5

If you are looking for the word for "moment", I think 瞬間 is the most appropriate. その瞬間に起こりました At that exact moment, it happened. As for "I have just now been thinking about that", you can use ただ今. ただ今考えてました I have just now been thinking about that.


5

I would translate "Right Now" to "tadaima"「只今」 and "At that exact moment" to "choudo sono toki"「ちょうどその時」 I would tranlste that two sentenses to 只今、それを考えていました。 ちょうどその時、X がありました。


5

The main point for saying "rough [time]" is that you should express [time] as a proper time period. (one) day 一日【いちにち】 (one) month [一ヶ月]{いっかげつ} (one) year 一年【いちねん】 (Cf., 良い一日を "Have a nice day".) 大変な一日だった/でした is I think common for "I had a rough day". 大変な一年 works similarly. 難しい一年 works as well, although it's more like "difficult year" than "rough ...


5

Earthliŋ has already provided a great answer, so instead of repeating what they've got, I figure I'll just fill out the information as it relates to the phrases presented in the question -- ways of saying it without 一【いち】, basically, and how natural they may or may not be. I did a few Google searches for various phrases (putting "quotes" around the terms to ...


5

分 isn't only used for "minutes", but also for "parts". For example, fractions are read ⅓ 三分の一 さんぶん の いち lit. one of three parts When 3分 means "three parts", it is always read さんぶん, not さんぷん. When 3分 means "three minutes", it is always read さんぷん, not さんぶん. Similarly, よんぷん = "four minutes" and よんぶん = "four parts". さんふん and よんふん are non-standard ...


5

About the question that isn't covered by the link Flaw provided: However, and contradicting the explanation given, the second example sentence does not take に. This is because here it is not an adverb nor a pronoun. Here です is a copula linking かいぎ to すいようび. に would be correct when you have a different verb, as in かいぎはすいようびにあります。


5

There actually is a rule governing the "Noun + Adjective" structures. The noun must signify either a spatial or temporal unit such as [朝]{あさ}、[夜]{よる}、[空]{そら}、[天]{てん}、[奥]{おく}, [時]{とき}, [数]{かず}, etc. The adjective must signify a degree or quantity regarding the preceding noun. These include ...


5

By far the most common way of expressing that would be to use 「この」 as in 「この1時間」、「この1ヶ月(間)」、「この1年(間)」, etc. Some natural ways to say "I spent the past hour studying Japanese." for us native speakers are:  「日本語の勉強にこの1時間をかけました。」  「この1時間を日本語の勉強に[充]{あ}てました。」  「この1時間をかけて日本語を勉強しました。」  「この1時間をかけて日本語の勉強をしました。」


4

According to Japan Meteorological Agency, by definition, "AのちB" stands for "A for the first half (of the period being forecasted), then B for the latter half." http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/kishou/know/faq/faq10.html Obviously the actual time depends on the "forecast period". Unless otherwise specified, "weather reports for tomorrow" on evening TV shows refer ...


4

I don't think "last" can be translated literally in most situations, or at least shouldn't. "Last" will be very much understood from context in most cases. I'd come up with: "When did we last meet?" この前会ったのはいつ? Kono mae atta no wa itsu? "When did you last see her?" 彼女を見たのはいつだった? Kanojo o mita no wa itsu datta? "When did you last do the laundry?" ...


4

Don't forget that 〜ているところ also means "starting something right now". 母;部屋の掃除した? (Did you clean your room?) 子:片付けてるところなんだ! (I'm starting to right now!)


4

Aside from the fact that "bike's time" and "Anna's time" don't make even sense in English (except for a very small set of contexts), I can't think of many scenarios where you'd use "possessive" time except for the following. And generally 時間 refers to the amount of time or the specific time of something, so it wouldn't always be interchangeable with とき ...



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