Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

We normally say [三十分]{さんじゅっぷん}. Some people say [半時間]{はんじかん}, but I think it's only used in Kansai area. 参考に・・→ OKWave「半時間って方言ですか」 P.S. I'm from Kyoto but actually I've never noticed any of my friends say 半時間... Most of them are in/from Kyoto, Osaka, or Shiga. I think it's more used by older people (probably in Osaka?), because the only two people I can ...


14

Yes, it is inclusive. All the similar phrases that use 以 are inclusive: 以内、以前、以上、以下、以来. However, unfortunately a lot of people do not know this and use them carelessly without thinking. If you wanted to express "After the 16th but not including it", you could say: 16日の翌日から参加できません。 However, I would be more inclined to say: 17日以降参加できません。


9

I think Hyperworm already did a good job of answering the question, so I'll just focus on saying "later"/"before". Adding 前{まえ} or 後{ご} after any of these to mean "a few ... ago" or "after a few ...", e.g. 数{すう}分{ふん}前{まえ} "a few minutes ago" or 数{すう}分{ふん}後{ご} "after a few minutes": 数{すう}秒{びょう}: "a few seconds" 数{すう}分{ふん}: "a few minutes" 数{すう}時{じ}間{かん}: ...


9

Two constructions spring to mind here. 数{すう} can be used in place of a specific number, followed by a counter, to mean "some" / "a few" / "several" (it doesn't really make a distinction in this respect...). 数時間後、彼は試験を終わった。 This can be used in ways you might not expect: 数十秒 some tens of seconds 十数秒 ten-(and-some)-odd seconds (between 10 and 19) ...


9

Your first sentence had grammatical mistakes irrelevant to the question, so I fixed it. 日本語を勉強し始めてからもうすぐ二年になります もうすぐ10時になりますね are both correct. なります does not need some state to transfer into. It can be just an instantaneous event, like 'becoming 10 o'clock'. The sentence × もうすぐ10時になりますから、そろそろ帰りましょうか 'Since it will be 10 o'clock soon, ...


8

Yes. You can address any day of the week by its first kanji, and you can refer to it in short using the respective onyomi. For example, you can say 月{げつ}水{すい}金{きん}はお休みです。 In fact you often hear the weekend referred to as (きん)どにち. You can also go half way and abbreviate it just to ◯曜, as in 日曜. Outside of spoken language you see the kanji used to represent ...


7

I believe you are making the mistake of attempting to replicate an English pattern in Japanese. As snailboat points out, the idiomatic equivalent is as follows: 泥棒はいつまでたっても泥棒。/三つ子の魂百まで。/性格を変えることはできない。 And if you make this search, http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Once+a+always+a one finds that the nearest Japanese equivalent seems to be: noun ...


7

It is a contracted form of ここの所. 所 typically means place, but has other uses such as heading a relative clause or, as in this case, refering to a time instead of a place. ここ is also referring to recent times rather than nearby places. The translation is 'these days', 'recently'. You are right that the dictionary you cited is wrong. It is misinterpreting 所. ...


6

I assume that it is a notice received from a library (please include the context in the question). The notice means that borrowing by you is suspended until Feb. 13, inclusive, and therefore you cannot check out library materials on Feb. 13. An example from Catch a Wave, April 13, 2012, via Space ALC: 毎年恒例のニューヨーク国際自動車ショーが今年は4月6日から15日まで開催されている。 The ...


5

じき means temporally farther than すぐ. I don't know if the meaning of じき overlaps with the English soon. If it does, then soon has a broader meaning than すぐ. じき can instead be translated as 'sooner or later', or 'eventually'.


5

I don't think "last" can be translated literally in most situations, or at least shouldn't. "Last" will be very much understood from context in most cases. I'd come up with: "When did we last meet?" この前会ったのはいつ? Kono mae atta no wa itsu? "When did you last see her?" 彼女を見たのはいつだった? Kanojo o mita no wa itsu datta? "When did you last do the laundry?" ...


5

Although 本日 will usually be too formal for most situations, there are many cases where you would use it over 今日 (with slightly different nuances). Typically when referring to something tied to the day's date: 本日の魚 (in a restaurant) 本日の会議 (in a professional context) etc.


4

Good observation that you mention deictic expressions. That is correct. Deictic pronouns with accusative case tend to be used adverbially rather than as pronouns; they already incorporate the meaning of on or に, so it would be redundant to have another ending. In traditional grammar, this is called adverbial accusative or adverbial objective. Latin clearly ...


4

About the question that isn't covered by the link Flaw provided: However, and contradicting the explanation given, the second example sentence does not take に. This is because here it is not an adverb nor a pronoun. Here です is a copula linking かいぎ to すいようび. に would be correct when you have a different verb, as in かいぎはすいようびにあります。


4

First lets take on ほとんど~ない and めったに~ない The big difference between the two can be expressed with these two keywords: 程度 and 頻度. ほとんど~ない expresses 程度 (you could think of it as "degree" or "extent") and 頻度 (frequency) (credit @sawa for pointing out ほとんど has both) めったに~ない expresses 頻度 only (or 回数の多さ, you could think of it as "frequency" or "how often ...


4

Aside from the fact that "bike's time" and "Anna's time" don't make even sense in English (except for a very small set of contexts), I can't think of many scenarios where you'd use "possessive" time except for the following. And generally 時間 refers to the amount of time or the specific time of something, so it wouldn't always be interchangeable with とき ...


4

According to Japan Meteorological Agency, by definition, "AのちB" stands for "A for the first half (of the period being forecasted), then B for the latter half." http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/kishou/know/faq/faq10.html Obviously the actual time depends on the "forecast period". Unless otherwise specified, "weather reports for tomorrow" on evening TV shows refer ...


3

平成 will last until the Emperor's death. So, until that happens, every future year is stated as 平成. If he were to pass away, then there would be a new name decided upon, and that year would be the final year of 平成 (up to day of his death) and the [元年]{がんねん} of the next era (starting from the day after his death). Once the change happens, obviously any ...


2

じき and すぐ are analogous. じき(に)〈すぐに〉 in a moment; immediately; 〈間もなく〉 soon; in a short time; before long e-g(1).もうじき12時だ. It is almost [close on, getting on for] twelve o’clock. e-g(2).この子はじきに物を覚える. This boy learns very quickly [is very quick to learn]. 〈直ちに〉 immediately; at once; straightaway; instantly; in a moment [minute]; in no time; on the spot; ...


2

Using になります in the context of time, and any other numeric scale is perfectly correct. You can actually think of it as "some sort of state" has been reached. Perhaps all the previous examples you've encountered so far were about someone/something becoming a particular person or thing, like: state: development stage of frogs target state: frog ...


2

This depends on the semantics that are unfortunately not given by the English language. If by "last", you mean "the final time" ("When did you see her for the final time?"), then 最後に is used as @Rolf said. But if "last" means "the most recent", I think 最近 is a better choice to use. Actually, they may both work, but I'm confident that 最近 works, but I have ...


2

It's possibly a little different for each of your examples even though they mean the same thing. However, the ones with "took" seem to emphasize more effort than the ones with "in", so it depends if you want to focus on that or not. I ran 5km in 23mins 59secs → 23分59秒 で 5キロメートル走った It took me 23mins 59 secs to run 5k → 5キロメートル走るのに23分59秒 かかった


1

Your initial Japanese sentence doesn't make sense. Anyway, for "before" or "used too", you can use 昔【むかし】 (long ago), 昔々 (if you really want to emphasize that it was long ago). Or you can simply say 前(は) or 以前(は) for a more "recent" period of before. 以前はこのバンドが好きじゃなかった(けど)。 You could also use かつて to mean "at one time/formerly", but I'm not too ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible