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The terms we use most often would be 「ダウン[症候群]{しょうこうぐん}」 or 「ダウン[症]{しょう}」. I feel like I heard the term 「[蒙古症]{もうこしょう}」 when I was little, but I sure do not hear/see it anymore. 「蒙古症」 would be a direct translation of the desease name from its counterpart in a European language (not sure which one). As we all know now, however, the desease has nothing to ...


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Apparently Dr. John Langdon Down discovered around 1860 what's now called Down's syndrome. Just like anyone, Dr. Down didn't name the syndrome after himself, but named it "mongolism" (also "mongoloid"), which was used widely until the 1960s. (More info here, at Down's Syndrome Scotland.) I'm guessing that 蒙古症 is a literal translation from English and was ...


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When learning Japanese as a foreign language, "consonant-stem" (respectively "vowel-stem") verbs are called thus, because their stem ends in a consonant (resp. vowel), where "stem" refers to the part not changing during inflection (conjugation). mi-ru, mi-tai, mi-masu, mi-nai, mi-r-eba, mi-y-ou... kik-u, kik-i-tai, kik-i-masu, kik-a-nai, kik-eba, ...


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You'll understand if you just look at them romanized: Vowel-stem verbs (一段動詞)  食べない tabe-nai  食べます tabe-masu  食べる  tabe-ru  食べれば tabe-reba  食べよう tabe-yoo The stem is tabe-, which ends with /e/, a vowel. Consonant-stem verbs (五段動詞)  泳がない oyog-anai  泳ぎます oyog-imasu  泳ぐ   oyog-u  泳げば  oyog-eba  泳ごう  oyog-oo The stem is oyog-, which ends with /g/, a ...



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