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17

The short answer is: not all the elements of all the characters are ‘radicals’. For example 凹 (concave, hollow) consists according to the dictionaries of 部首 bushu (or radical if you will, more on that below) 凵 and three more strokes that cannot be further analyzed or categorized. A more complete answer would depend (as Tsuyoshi Ito already indicated in his ...


14

As far as Internet slang goes, the word 豆腐{とうふ} is often used as a term for replacement glyphs because of their rectangular shapes, and 豆腐[化]{ば}け or 豆腐[化]{か} describe the phenomenon in one word. 画面上の日本語がすべて豆腐になってしまっていて読めない フォント設定を変更しても豆腐化けが直らない


12

It is read as めい. “ユーザ名” is read as ユーザめい, “Skype 名” is スカイプめい. I do not know the reason for that, but if I make a guess, this may be because gairaigo in a compound word is treated in a similar way to Sino-Japanese words.


11

They are known as Arabic Numerals, or アラビア数字 in Japanese. As you may notice, 1, 2, 3, etc. were developed by Indian mathematicians and did not originate from ancient Rome. Up until the 14th century Roman numerals were used, but were eventually abandoned in favor of Arabic Numerals.


9

Wikipedia says that Osaka used to be spelt 大坂, and is now spelt 大阪. It is more complicated than that: Initially it was 難波 (Naniwa). In 1496, it was 小坂 ("Little Hill", Osaka AND Ozaka). 尾坂 and other spellings also exist. This is thought to focus more on the area around Ishiyama Honganji. In 1583, Toyotomi Hideyoshi built 大坂城, and throughout the Edo ...


8

It is still a case of 文字化け. 文字化け means the phenomenon where characters are shown incorrectly on computers, and its cause is not necessarily a mismatch of character encodings. I do not know a specific term for the kind of 文字化け which you are talking about. I would say something along フォントが足りないことによって起きる文字化け. By the way, the glyphs used in this situation are ...


8

As cypher said, they are called 記号. Usually, this refers to characters other than letters (kana, kanji, and alphabetic letters) and numerals. Some computer programs call them 特殊文字, but in this case the emphasis is on the fact that entering them requires a special method. In typography, characters other than letters and numerals are called [約物]{やくもの}.


8

I think there are three variants of this. 1. Translation or summary for the benefit of foreigners. 2. "Copy" which is there just to make things look pretty. 3. Words that pretty much became part of Japanese and are used as part of the Japanese text (words like no, yes, on, off, hello, world etc.). In the second category, you have 2 sub categories IMO. a) ...


8

I found three fairly comprehensive lists online; each covers slightly different areas. http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Japanese/Vocabulary/Linguistics http://thejapanesepage.com/w/index.php?title=Grammatical_terms http://www.omegawiki.org/Part_of_speech/jpn


7

漢和辞典 is what you want: Shinchosha have just released a Kanji-only dictionary called: Shin'Nihongo Kanji Jiten: http://www.shinchosha.co.jp/jiten/kanjijiten/index.html that includes not only words with origins in China, but also native Japanese words that happen to be scripted in Kanji.


7

EDICT (which is the corpus JquickTrans apparently uses) has several special dictionaries for technical terms. The "Computing/Telecomms" dictionary includes such wonderful words as: 変数設定 【へんすうせってい】 (n) variable initialization 参照渡し 【さんしょうわたし】 (n) call by reference オブジェクト[指向]{しこう}プログラミング (n) object-oriented programming


7

I think you would call them 記{き}号{ごう}, or "symbols". If you look at the Microsoft Office IME's 入力できる特殊文字の一覧 page, you'll see some of these listed under きごう. I think you could also call them 特{とく}殊{しゅ}文{も}字{じ}, or "special characters".


7

Arguing about whether certain words "are" something or other is missing the point in this context, I think. We do not classify words based on some innate, a priori nature that we discern within them. We classify them based on behaviour. And there is no a priori set of standards for that classification either: we have to choose our own. It's completely ...


7

Modern Japanese is very different from archaic Japanese (and some modern formal written Japanese, which is itself rather archaic) in regard to the topic at hand. Initially there were distinct conjugations of verbs and adjectives known as predicative and attributive. Predicative (also called conclusive) was used for the final verb in a sentence, and was ...


7

I believe that when you use the 連用形 as a conjunction, the form is referred to as the 中止形. This usage is described by 中止法.


6

nkjit's guess of 漢字読めない (kanji yomenai) was correct. I don't know exactly what 漢字読めない (kanji yomenai) means, but the term seems to exist, possibly as a slight neologism. It's mentioned in Japanese Wikipedia's page on KY. Then Japanese Prime Minister Tarō Asō has apparently been called a KY for his misreading of kanji. Describing himself as a Manga fan ...


6

一飜縛り【いーはんしばり】: your hand must be worth one han before you can declare a win. 二ハン場、I think, is a reference to 場【ば】ゾロ which is an additional two han given when calculating the score (two han is usual, at least). とし is just the stem form of とする, so it's laying out these two rules, which apply to every round.


5

デッキ as a deck of cards is not established among the general people. I guess only people who are particularly related to playing cards, RPG cards, or magicians may use it in that way. For most other people, デッキ will primarily mean 'cassette deck', or the meanings rintaun mentions, or as part of a noun compound デッキチェアー 'deck chair'. 単語帳 particularly means ...


5

After reviewing Wikipedia article 語種, which states that a word is either 和語【わご】, 漢語【かんご】, 外来語, or 混種語【こんしゅご】, I can safely answer that 電子レンジ belongs to 混種語 group. A 混種語 (mixed type word) is a combination of two or more words (hence, is also a 複合語【ふくごうご】) of differing categories 和語, 漢語, 外来語. 和語: native Japanese, which include most 動詞 and 形容詞. Includes ...


5

As others have argued, it's pretty much a question of definition. But it seems obvious that in form, there's overlap between i-adjectives and plain verb-negatives. I'm going to try to be constructive about it by starting a list of forms that exist in either or both of the cases. Please add or comment (or fix my formatting) as you see fit. ○食べない    ○赤い ...


5

According to Microsoft Language Portal, they call it “wait cursor” in English and “待機カーソル” in Japanese in the documentation for Visual Studio 2008 SP1, 2010, and 2012. I am not sure how popular this term is among users.


5

In Japanese, a 助動詞 is a conjugatable particle, as opposed to 助詞 which do not conjugate. Like noun, verb etc, 助動詞 is now considered a part of of speech. The terminology is rather unfortunate, but originally (early Meiji) it was sub-classified under the category of verb (動詞). This is due to the influence of English in which 助動詞 represents "auxiliary verbs" ...


4

No, they aren't adjectives. They mostly follow the same basic grammatical rules (with a few exceptions) that い adjectives do. However there are several grammatical constructs that only with either ~ない verbs or い adjectives. More over in classical Japanese ~ない was things like ~ず ~ぬ ~ん most of the time. Those constructs have zero resemblance to い ...


3

I have been using JquickTrans dictionary software for years (had to pay $15 before but it's freeware now), and it has a few specialized dictionary catalogs that could be useful to find science and math terms:


3

There is a disagreement between Troyen and Derek, and I am not sure to determine which is correct, so I will give two possibilities: If it is the case, as you suggest, that there is no (compound) word as gas range in English, then ガスレンジ would be an instance of 和製英語. If on the other hand, as Derek suggests, an English compound word gas range was incorporated ...


3

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/cgi-bin/wwwjdic.cgi?1C has many dictionaries, including some scientific ones. But you asked for print media... Computer Terms - English-Japanese / Japanese-English Dictionary of Computer and Data-Processing Terms Chemical & Science - Japanese-English Chemical Dictionary: Including a Guide to Japanese Patents and ...


3

I think this is a rather hard question to answer, since you'll find people using the term keigo in both senses. I prefer to use in the first sense, but it's practically inevitable that keigo training manuals (especially those directed at foreigners) will also teach about the second one, since knowing keigo without knowing when and where to apply is kinda ...


2

They are called adverbs. Among them, やっぱり and うっかり are called sentential adverbs, and are independent of the core event described by the predicate. さっぱり, ひっそり, ぐっすり, and すっきり are called manner adverbs, and are directly tied to the core event described by the predicate. I am not sure which group こっそり belongs to.


2

デッキ seems to be most often used in the sense of the first definition given on Wiktionary: Any flat surface that can be walked on: a balcony; a porch; a raised patio; a flat rooftop. 単語帳 describes what you're talking about perfectly.



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