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逃げたくなった is: 逃げる = "to flee", in its stem form (連用形) → 逃げ ~たい = the suffix that expresses wanting to do, conjugated to ~たく (again, the 連用形) なる = "to become", in past tense → なった So this means something to the effect of "it became the case that he wanted to get away". For the sentence as a whole, I would offer a translation like "he began to want to get ...


5

To ask about the difference between A and B, you could say: A と B の違{ちが}いは何{なん}ですか? Here, we put two nouns together with と, giving us the larger noun phrase AとB. We want to join this to the noun 違い "difference", so we use the genitive particle の. Literal translation doesn't work very well between English and Japanese; our phrase is literally close to ...


4

There are a couple issues here. First off, the 次 here is about the next 役員 or board / committee member, not about the next meeting. 次の役員が決まらなくて the next board member(s) が not decided 随分長く掛かりました it [the meeting] took a really long time So basically, the man is saying that the last meeting (that the woman mentions) took a really long time, ...


4

You are right that it's in disagreement with itself tense-wise, and that is what makes it ungrammatical. ✗ 電車に乗ったときは、白線の内側でお待ちください。 ✗ "When you got on the train, please wait on the inside of the white lines." 電車に乗るときは、白線の内側でお待ちください。 "When you get on the train, please wait on the inside of the white lines." As seen by these translations, if you ...


3

「〜いる」 primer Japanese is honestly far more simple than English when it comes to aspect. In Japanese, the rule is that 「〜いる」 means you are currently (or will be) in some state related to the verb, while 「〜いた」 means you had been in some state related to the verb. There are many such states: The state of doing something (progressive). The state of ...


3

To my understanding as a native speaker, in all of the three examples, sentence (1) is written from the author's perspective, and sentence (2) is written from the perspective of a character in the story. The switching of the perspectives is in fact, in these examples, is signalled by the change of the tenses. The sentences in Example 24 could be written in ...


3

聞いてた sounds like "Are you listening?" 聞いた is closer to "Did you hear about that?"


2

Temporal sequencing in Japanese is quite complicated so to answer your question I am going to simplify the sentence, if I may, to: If you have received this letter then I have (already) been killed in the war. (This allows me to avoid questions about the use of 〜ている and resultant state verbs which is also complicated and not the main point of your ...


2

I also believe you can say it like so: AとBは どう違{ちが}うの? Or "As for A and B, how are they different?


2

あなたが映画を見ているあいだ、私は買い物に行きます。 みんなが遊んでいるあいだ、私は働いています。 Both sentences are perfectly standard. The structure あいだ(に), is indeed not bound to being used with the past tense.


2

The difference between 好きでした and 好きです is somewhat subtle. It depends on whether or not the action/event/whatever being described is a one time event or an ongoing action. For example, If you liked a concert you would probably say 好きでした (or, if you wanted to sound even more natural, 面白{おもしろ}かった -- It was interesting). If you like studying Japanese, you would ...


2

I would say : instead of presenting it as a simple given event, he summarizes the beginning of the match, kind of headlining what happened during this opening, making it last longer in the readers mind. So you could say it is a historic present.


2

Subtitles don't translate directly, word-to-word or form-to-form. 落ちる here is grammatically present tense, but semantically it can be seen as future. Because there is no "real" future tense in Japanese. We (are going to) fall!


2

Based on what I've seen in the video: In this scene, she utters it on the plane. Japanese 落ちる usually implies the result of falling, so in this case she literally says: "We (our planes) are going to crash!" Maybe the translator wanted to make a more liberal translation. By the way, the same line is repeated by another woman immediately after it. It sounds ...


1

I've found an explanation on how tense switching works here: A part of a past event (often a state rather than an action) can be described using the nonpast tense, if the writer perceives it to be relatively unimportant circumstantial information that has no direct bearing upon the major story line. Just in case, I've scanned the relevant bits that ...


1

Just an addition to current answers/comments. It could also be a Hokkaido thing. When I lived and worked in Sapporo, some people (mostly 50 and older) would use a similar past tense. For e.g., I might get a phone call where the other person might say "もしもし、佐藤でした" instead of "もしもし、佐藤です" you might find more details by googling "北海道弁 過去形"



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