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First, what sounds natural in English is of no relevance to what sounds natural in Japanese as the two languages are completely unrelated. This "advertisement" is a creation of Japan Tabacco Inc., which is a private company; therefore, it is not a public announcement (at least by the Japanese standards). Since it is advertisement, it can have more ...


4

In addition to the previous answer, often these forms are seen with an particle in the middle (は or も), and are used followed by for such as が・けど (examples borrowed/stolen from internet, any translation mistakes my own) 気持ち分からなくはないけど... It's not that I don't understand his feelings, but... (I do understand, but I still don't approve of his actions/won't ...


3

It sounds like you already have the correct understanding, and you're just looking for confirmation/better motivation to believe what you suspect to be true. For attributive verbs, the present progressive (~している) is considered informal, and is therefore forced to be recast as the plain form (~する). So you're essentially correct -- in a colloquial/informal ...


3

You have actually picked two good examples to explain an odd corner of Japanese. 〜と思う and 〜ことにする both are "state-change" verbs regarding things that happen in people's heads. These sorts of verbs have rules. 〜と思う Plain: State-change (私は)ジョンが大丈夫だと思う。 Lit. "I just had the thought that Jon is okay." "I think that Jon is okay." 〜ている: Stative ...


3

Double negatives are used not just in Japanese. It's not that I'm not hungry... Since (-1)•(-1)=1, it makes only sense to use a double negative, if its meaning is different from the positive, viz. either stronger or weaker than the positive. In English, the double negative feels weaker than the positive. In Japanese, the double negative is stronger ...



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