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12

I imagine most grammar texts break Japanese tenses into past and non-past. So the plain form can be used to describe something you will do (once) in the future as well as something you do on a regular basis or something that tends to happen. Context tells you which is meant: 明日【あした】は映画【えいが】を見【み】る。 Tomorrow I will watch a movie. ...


9

This form is called in many names: the base form, the dictionary form, the imperfect form (which is a rather inaccurate term), and the non-past form. Its Japanese name (which you'll commonly find used on Japanese.SE.com) is [終止形]{しゅうしけい}, but that term refers to the shape of this form (i.e. how it conjugates) and not to its meaning. The broadest (and ...


9

~ってから shows "one after another". 行ってから means "after I go". ~ったから shows "cause & effect". 行ったから means "because I went". Note that 行くから is also valid, which means "because I (plan to) go" EDIT: To answer additional question added by OP: アメリカに行くから本を買う I'm going to buy the book because I'm going to America. -> You buy the book before you go, and ...


8

The past tense would be: お腹がすいていた This would be along the lines of "my stomach was in the state of being empty" or simply "I was hungry." Additionally, the "た” in お腹がすいた is not showing "past tense" but is actually showing the completion of an action. In this case, the stomach has emptied. 食べた後で部屋を掃除します。This is the "た” which shows completion of an action. ...


7

I think that どうしてわかったのですか and どうしてわかるのですか correspond to “How did you know” and “How do you know” in the way you described. どうして知っていましたか and どうして知っていますか do not sound right, but I am not sure why. Unlike どうしてわかるのですか, どうして知っているのですか (Why do you have that knowledge?) implies that the assertion is correct. どうして知っていたのですか (Why did you have that knowledge?) also ...


7

The first sentence here forms an excellent question, because it highlights the issue of tense in subordinate clauses, which can be counter-intuitive coming from an English background. 明日、家へ帰って、母が作ったおいしい料理を食べます。 The English mind looks at this and thinks about the verb 作る relative to the time when this statement is made. Since we're talking about a ...


6

I am pretty sure that wherever you had this question, there was a context because any of these four can be correct depending on the context. If it was asked without context, I will have to say that your source is not reliable for studying Japanese. 僕はこれまで彼をある出来事のために恨んできた。でも、それは三十年前のことだから、もう忘れる。 僕はかつて難しい計算ができた。でも、それは三十年前のことだから、もう忘れた。 ...


6

This is definitely not unusual: verbs often switch tenses in the middle of Japanese narratives for effect. I don't have a definitive reference to back this up, but I'll try to explain the general concept as best I understand it. If I remember correctly, the past tense often has more emphasis in a Japanese narrative than the present tense. For example, ...


6

In my opinion, You can use ありがとうございます most of the time, but ありがとうございました cannot used when the request is not finished yet. For example., Aさん: この報告の確認を頼んでもよろしいでしょうか? (Could you please check the report?) Bさん: 了解! (ok) Aさん: ありがとうございます。  (Bさん havn't finished yet the checking, so you better use ありがとうございます instead of ありがとうございました)


5

First, what sounds natural in English is of no relevance to what sounds natural in Japanese as the two languages are completely unrelated. This "advertisement" is a creation of Japan Tabacco Inc., which is a private company; therefore, it is not a public announcement (at least by the Japanese standards). Since it is advertisement, it can have more ...


5

As phirru already answered, “I was hungry” is おなかがすいていた. However, this is not the past form of おなかがすいた. Although phirru explained it in his/her answer, let me be more explicit in this regard. おなかがすいた is the past form of おなかがすく, which means to become hungry. In other words, おなかがすく refers to the change of the state from “not hungry” to “hungry.” For ...


5

行った is the past tense, 行って is the -te form. 行ったから - because (I) went, から here means "because" 僕が行ったから君やってよ - You do it, because I (already) went (to get something). 行ってから - after (I) go, から here means "from" or "after" それは行ってから考えましょう - Let's think about this after we go (there).


4

To be fair, I can't really tell the difference between these 2 english sentences: They are quite different in both English and Japanese, as I'll try to explain with sample situations. 昨日何をした? is a very direct and casual question to ask "what did you do yesterday." You ask it on Monday morning to your colleagues at work. There is no other message than ...


4

In general, trying to translate specific sentences from English into Japanese isn't the best way to learn Japanese grammar (although it can be part of a greater experience). Japanese grammar doesn't work exactly the same as English grammar and has different "building blocks", so things don't always translate directly over. Nevertheless, here are how you ...


4

In addition to the previous answer, often these forms are seen with an particle in the middle (は or も), and are used followed by for such as が・けど (examples borrowed/stolen from internet, any translation mistakes my own) 気持ち分からなくはないけど... It's not that I don't understand his feelings, but... (I do understand, but I still don't approve of his actions/won't ...


3

It sounds like you already have the correct understanding, and you're just looking for confirmation/better motivation to believe what you suspect to be true. For attributive verbs, the present progressive (~している) is considered informal, and is therefore forced to be recast as the plain form (~する). So you're essentially correct -- in a colloquial/informal ...


3

You have actually picked two good examples to explain an odd corner of Japanese. 〜と思う and 〜ことにする both are "state-change" verbs regarding things that happen in people's heads. These sorts of verbs have rules. 〜と思う Plain: State-change (私は)ジョンが大丈夫だと思う。 Lit. "I just had the thought that Jon is okay." "I think that Jon is okay." 〜ている: Stative ...


3

Double negatives are used not just in Japanese. It's not that I'm not hungry... Since (-1)•(-1)=1, it makes only sense to use a double negative, if its meaning is different from the positive, viz. either stronger or weaker than the positive. In English, the double negative feels weaker than the positive. In Japanese, the double negative is stronger ...


3

The speaker, not seeing any signs of regret from person X who did not take the chance to counter attack, believes that person X made this choice deliberately, and that person X still believes in the correctness of his actions even after the fact. The question means: what is your mindset, person X? Why do you believe, presently, that you made the right ...


3

A quick search on Google of "ありがとうございます" "ありがとうございました" shows many discussions about the usage of these two expressions, mostly in Japanese (presumably by many Japanese people), and there does not seem to be a definitive answer. What your teacher told you about it is correct as a general rule, but as YOU said, ありがとうございます is appropriate also when you thank ...


3

Is the 「の」 particle in that sentence also the same as the particle の for explanation ? Seems like that's the case. My lecturer in college explained that this usage of の transforms the predicate into a nominal clause, something similar to using "the fact that" to wrap your statement in English. A: なぜケーキを食べませんでしたか? (Why did you not eat the cake?) ...


3

As I've answered in other posts (like this one), 〜つつある is a construct meaning "happening right now" that disambiguates confusion that 〜ている may have. However, for your example ("is dying"), 死にかける/死にかかる is more appropriate as @glacier mentioned in the comments.


3

There's not a solid grammar-based way to express this with stateful verbs such as the ones in your example, at least as far as I'm aware. You'll probably need to use an adverb. Two such examples are the general [中]{ちゅう} and [途]{と}[中]{ちゅう} (which probably has a more specialized usage). Either example should at least get your point across with your "He is ...


2

"だか" sounds very harsh. I've already discussed it a bit in situations like 行くかい. I just believe that inserting の here allows to soften the sound without changing the meaning.


2

Isn't that, "Tomorrow, I return home and eat the delicious food my mother made." ? In English, it's past-tense, too. If she was making the food still, you could use 作る instead. Also, if you're thinking of it as the food she has historically made, I could see it making sense in both languages, too, but English would definitely lean towards present tense.


2

It can go either way. I think it struck you as odd because that example lacks any context. 映画学のクラスでは何をする?What do you do in film class? 映画を見る。Watch movies. 授業が終わったら何をするの?What are you going to do after class? 映画を見る。[I will] Watch movies. In Japanese they call it 辞書形 (dictionary form), and in English it's the imperfective.


1

Your initial Japanese sentence doesn't make sense. Anyway, for "before" or "used too", you can use 昔【むかし】 (long ago), 昔々 (if you really want to emphasize that it was long ago). Or you can simply say 前(は) or 以前(は) for a more "recent" period of before. 以前はこのバンドが好きじゃなかった(けど)。 You could also use かつて to mean "at one time/formerly", but I'm not too ...



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