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Usually, A-て B composition describes "do B with effect or result of A", that is, either A continues as long as B does (like your second one 輝いて見えた), or A completes when/before B starts. But I know, oddly enough, A sometimes accepts action of utterance that apparently too late for B's beginning. Some examples through quick Googling: ...


2

Generally speaking, connecting two verbs like this using te-form indicates the two actions happens simultaneously, or the second one happens soon after the first one. 酔って運転する drive under the influence of alcohol, drink and drive 会って話す meet and talk 食べて寝る eat and sleep, go to bed just after eating 遊んで暮らす spend days in idleness In your ...


1

As you understand, 興奮する is not a static aspect (, which is 興奮している). In that sense, the description of the dictionary should be "興奮する: get excited, 興奮している: be excited". However the problem is, actual usage of the two forms isn't correspondent between English and Japanese. For example, "I watched the movie. I was excited" is (I believe) more common than "got ...


2

Your guess is perfectly right. [EDIT for the update: the basic meaning of continuative forms is sequential occurrence, may or may not imply causality.] And the last part 大きく息を吐く describes a motion of deep breath (expiration). I think English speakers give "sigh of relief", too. Perhaps it's more understandable in English to merge the last te-form verb chain ...



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