New answers tagged

2

Yes, for example... ~ておいで -> ~といで e.g. 持っておいで -> 持っといで ~ておくれ -> ~とくれ e.g. 来ておくれ -> 来とくれ (← might be Edo/Tokyo dialect) Yes, for example... ~でしまう -> ~じまう (でし→じ) e.g. 死んでしまう -> 死んじまう (→ often contracted to 死んじゃう) ~てしまう -> ~ちまう (てし→ち) e.g. やってしまう -> やっちまう (→ often contracted to やっちゃう) ~てあげる -> ~たげる (てあ→た) e.g. 買ってあげる -> 買ったげる ~であげる -> ...


2

"1. Can the てお -> と shortcut be used for contexts other than ておく (for example: お世話になっております -> おせわになっとります)?" The なっております-to-なっとります contraction does happen dialectally. You will hear it many times daily in Central Japan and Kansai. I am sure that it is used in many other parts of Western Japan as well. Around Tokyo, you will rarely hear it used. When ...


3

I agree that James Scott Tayler's answer is correct, however strictly speaking the verbs could also be in the dictionary form. For example: 旅行するの(が)好きだし、映画を見るのも好きです. I like traveling, and I also like watching movies


7

If you are listing multiple actions in a set (eg. of things you like) then you would use verb+たり〜verb+たりするのが好き. 旅行したり、映画を見たりするのが好きです。 I like to do things like watching movies and travelling. Your initial sentence reads like the two actions are connected. As you like to first travel somewhere and then watch a movie there.


0

I'm going to take a shot at answering this, after l'électeur helped me straighten out some things: あのとき右に曲がれば、どうなっただろう。 would probably be fitting for "If I turned right back then, I wonder what events would have taken place." This sentence seems to emphasise the action of turning, and the process of resulting actions taking place. ...


7

Yes, your second sentence sounds better than your first, but it still lacks the conciseness that many readers require in writing. The even more concise and less lengthy way to say it is to use a relative clause. 「ブラッド・ピットはロサンゼルスに[住]{す}んでいる[有名]{ゆうめい}な[俳優]{はいゆう}です。」 = "Brad Pitt is a well-known actor who lives in L.A." (Whether it is "to live" or ...


2

Let's talk about the imperative in Japanese: an imperative is a way to give orders and/or commands. However, the form of these utterances decides whether they are humble requests to barked orders. You can find a quite complete reference here In general you can use a number of forms: ます-stem+なさい: this is a polite yet firm request. It is often used to ...


0

Choco's right but being pedantic ;) ~て form is often used as a casual direct request/command. ドア開けて!早く飲んで! Adding くれ!makes it very powerful, impatient, angry, desperate or comic. ~なさい is more how you would politely but strongly address/command/request a child or 'lower' person. You could also see it as one step down in formality from ください。 Like many ...


6

The sentence A: A: 宿題をして行かない生徒が多いです。 This almost always means "There are many students who go to school without doing their homework." (ie, they go to school anyway) In English, "Don't drink and drive" always means "Don't drive after you drink", not "Don't drink! Do drive!". Here "drink-and-drive" is treated as one set. And "Let's not go and see him" ...


9

If sentence A has a comma like: A: 宿題をして、行かない生徒が多いです。 B: 宿題をしないで行く生徒が多いです。 then Sjiveru is right. However, it doesn't have a comma, so they have the same meaning. They mean "There are many students who go without doing their homework." The して行かない doesn't mean "don't go" but "don't do their homework."


0

Sjiveru is right, but allow me to break it down a bit... The て part indicates the verb is in te-form ( て形【けい】 in Japanese ). It has many uses which you can review on your own, but the one I want to highlight here is how it connects clauses or verbs together. This can be roughly translate the verb to "and" but also "but" like: ケーキを食【た】べてコーヒーを飲【の】みました。 I ...


3

No, they are quite different. B is fairly normal, and means 'there are many students who go [to school, I assume] without doing their homework'. The doing part is negated, not the going - they still go to school, it's only the homework they don't do. A can instead be translated as 'there are many students who do their homework and then don't go'. The going ...


5

「ありまして」is just a really polite form of 「あって」. In the standard polite sentence, only the final verb is put into the polite -ます form, while the rest are in the regular dictionary forms: 朝ご飯を食べてシャワーを浴びました。 While often overkill, it is possible to put the other connecting verbs into the -ます form as well. The resulting「まして」form has the same function as the ...



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