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9

If sentence A has a comma like: A: 宿題をして、行かない生徒が多いです。 B: 宿題をしないで行く生徒が多いです。 then Sjiveru is right. However, it doesn't have a comma, so they have the same meaning. They mean "There are many students who go without doing their homework." The して行かない doesn't mean "don't go" but "don't do their homework."


8

The standard form is おもしろくて仕方ない, where おもしろくて is used as an adjective (not adverb) in the て-form for connecting predicates. (て-form adjective) + 仕方ない or (たい-form verb in て-form) + 仕方ない is a common phrase that means “It's so (adjective)” or “I really want to (verb)”. The nuance of this 仕方ない is “I can't stand it”, but it's not to be taken ...


7

The former. For the vast majority of verbs and situations I can think of, it is: まだ [ te-form verb ] いない I haven't [ past participle ] yet まだ髪が乾いていない My hair hasn't dried yet その本はまだ読んでいない I haven't read that book yet まだ聴いていない曲 A song I haven't heard yet I'm not [ present participle ] yet can be expressed with something like: まだ [ verb stem ] ...


7

かけた as Current State This question is testing whether you understand how the seemingly past tense かけた can actually be describing the current state of a person. This kind of verb usage happens a lot with articles of clothing. The correct translation is not “who wore glasses”, but rather: The person beside me who is wearing glasses is Suzuki-san. ...


7

Yes, your second sentence sounds better than your first, but it still lacks the conciseness that many readers require in writing. The even more concise and less lengthy way to say it is to use a relative clause. 「ブラッド・ピットはロサンゼルスに[住]{す}んでいる[有名]{ゆうめい}な[俳優]{はいゆう}です。」 = "Brad Pitt is a well-known actor who lives in L.A." (Whether it is "to live" or ...


7

If you are listing multiple actions in a set (eg. of things you like) then you would use verb+たり〜verb+たりするのが好き. 旅行したり、映画を見たりするのが好きです。 I like to do things like watching movies and travelling. Your initial sentence reads like the two actions are connected. As you like to first travel somewhere and then watch a movie there.


6

It's a contraction of ~ているな. The な here means 'don't', as a negative imperative. 「ボッと立ってんなよ」 means 「ボッと立っているなよ」 'Don't just stand there dazed.'


6

お + [masu-stem] + ください is keigo (honorific speech) for [te-form] + ください. This rule works for verbs, which don't have a separate keigo verb, e.g. 切る お切りください If the verb does have a separate keigo form, the formation is different: お見ください → ご覧ください お言いください → おっしゃってください お行きください → いらしてください お来ください → おこしください


6

The sentence A: A: 宿題をして行かない生徒が多いです。 This almost always means "There are many students who go to school without doing their homework." (ie, they go to school anyway) In English, "Don't drink and drive" always means "Don't drive after you drink", not "Don't drink! Do drive!". Here "drink-and-drive" is treated as one set. And "Let's not go and see him" ...


5

"It's clear to me that [結婚]{けっこん}する is a change verb, but I'm not sure if 結婚する is transitive or intransitive." In Japanese, it is intransitive. You can only say 「Person + と + 結婚する」, never 「Person + を + 結婚する」. " All the dictionaries I've checked don't list 結婚する, just 結婚." Of course not, because 「結婚する」 is two words. For the sake of a smooth ...


5

どんなに寒くても...(No matter how cold it is...) is correct, but どんなに寒いでも is incorrect. Maybe it was a typo of どんなに寒い日でも or something. You form the phrase this way: with i-adjectives: 「どんなに/どれほど+連用形(~く)+て+も」 eg. 「どんなに忙しくても」「どんなに古くても」 with na-adjectives: 「どんなに/どれほど+連用形(~で)+も」 eg. 「どんなにきれいでも」「どんなに好きでも」 with nouns: 「どんなに/どれほど+(adjective)+noun+で+も」 eg. ...


5

This may be too obvious to OP, but we can use られる and say like this: その本{ほん}を読んで{よんで}みられると良い{よい}でしょう。 食べて{たべて}みられることをお勧め{おすすめ}します。 正直{しょうじき}に言って{いって}みられてはどうですか。 But I recommend that you try to apply honorifics to the main verb (these are more common, and perhaps politer, too): その本{ほん}をお読み{およみ}になってみると良い{よい}でしょう。 召し{めし}上が{あが}ってみることをお勧め{おすすめ}します。 ...


5

The combination of a verb stem - 連用形{れんようけい}, the form you use before ます - and お is a common combination used in a lot of keigo that can take a lot of suffixes. In this case, お切りください is much politer than 切ってください; that is appropriate since you are the customer.


5

「ありまして」is just a really polite form of 「あって」. In the standard polite sentence, only the final verb is put into the polite -ます form, while the rest are in the regular dictionary forms: 朝ご飯を食べてシャワーを浴びました。 While often overkill, it is possible to put the other connecting verbs into the -ます form as well. The resulting「まして」form has the same function as the ...


4

これはAで、Bではありません。 means 'This is A, not B.' This is similar to これはBではなく、Aです。(This is not B, but A). これはAですが、Bではありません。(This is A, but not B.) So これらは "Yes, I'm following you; please continue."という意味で、"Yes, I agree." という意味ではありません。 means 'This means "Yes, I'm following you; please continue" and NOT "Yes I agree".' You would say ...


4

「Verb in [連用形]{れんようけい} + て + の + Noun」 is a phrase pattern in which the "Verb + て + の" part describes the condition that generates what is expressed by the following noun. 「“[昭和]{しょうわ}な[顔]{かお}”を[買]{か}われての[起用]{きよう}」 means: "casting based upon his reputation as having the 'Showa-esque face'" 「買われる」 here means "to be regarded highly". (I am not ...


4

The intransitive verb 届く (to reach) and the transitive verb 届ける (to convey, to deliver) are usually used with tangible objects such as letters. But it's also frequently used with words representing feelings. 感謝の気持ちを届ける convey the feelings of gratitude 君に届け Let (It) Reach You The second example is the title of a manga, and people can easily ...


4

I think it works. After all, 「お風呂に入って寝る」 means "take a bath and go to bed". I think (お風呂)入る here is closer to English "take a bath" rather than "enter the bath". It's similar to how 上がる is closer to "enter a house" rather than "rise into the house" (see this answer). If you need to talk about something during the bath, you can combine it with いる: ...


4

The conjunctive form (aka pre-ます form) sounds more dry/learned/erudite/scholarly/formal. I hate all of those adjectives to describe it, but I think you know what I mean. It's of a higher register than the て form.


4

There are specific phrases for this, テスト勉強 and 試験勉強 (preparation for a test/exam). The most common wording in this situation would be: 教科書を読んで試験勉強をします。 教科書を読んでテスト勉強をします。 See this question about the difference between 試験 and テスト. If you don't know whether you need を after 勉強, see this question. If you want to use some particle between 試験 and 勉強, you can ...


4

This is one of those times when translating literally doesn't quite give you what you want. The sentence means something along the lines of "no matter what happens, it'll probably be fine." The 何 in this case is the "what" in question. 何かがあっても、大丈夫だろ is also grammatically correct (I think?), but it sounds a bit weird to me. That would basically be saying ...


4

Yes, for example... ~ておいで -> ~といで e.g. 持っておいで -> 持っといで ~ておくれ -> ~とくれ e.g. 来ておくれ -> 来とくれ (← might be Edo/Tokyo dialect) Yes, for example... ~でしまう -> ~じまう (でし→じ) e.g. 死んでしまう -> 死んじまう (→ often contracted to 死んじゃう) ~てしまう -> ~ちまう (てし→ち) e.g. やってしまう -> やっちまう (→ often contracted to やっちゃう) ~てあげる -> ~たげる (てあ→た) e.g. 買ってあげる -> 買ったげる ~であげる -> ...


3

Looks to me to be just the て that joins clauses i.e. verb-A-て verb-B do verb-A and do verb-B or, during the act of verb-A, verb-B The latter option seems to work better here. Living in these times, we know that wickedness is increasing more and more.


3

By ending the sentence like this, the speaker is implying he has something more to say. His wife died, his kids left home, and that may not be the end of his story. Or he may just want to add how sad he was. He may continue his story right after this sentence, but the remaining part may be simply omitted when it's obvious. 「明日映画に行こう。」「あー、今、お金がなくて…。」 ...


3

I would like to add a note on the implications of 〜てみたい. Consider the case of the verb 行く. In a simple sentence such as Xに行ってみたい, it may imply you have never been to X before. In general, however, it implies that the verbal action is in some sense something new to you, and that you'd like to experience it. Or in other words, if you are trying out something ...


3

~たい expresses your desire to do something. ~てみる is used to express that you will try something (usually for the first time). so when you put them together, ~てみたい expresses that you want to try to do something for the first time. (which would imply that you will see if you like it or not). This works for all verbs. 夏休みに日本に行きたいです。 I want to go to Japan during ...


3

First, whether the main verb is 「[食]{た}べる」 or 「[行]{い}く」, the usages of 「~~たい」 and 「~~てみたい」 stay the same. If I said 「スペインに行ってみたい。」, what should you know as a listener? You should know that: 1) I am interested in going to Spain. And also that; 2) I have never been to Spain. ← This is an implied fact. From this simple sentence alone, however, ...


3

I think you have almost grasped the "tournure" and I have few to contribute, but... I assume the phrase is still a contraction of 見ていて That's correct. As for the example, the girl in the film says おとう、見てて. That corresponds to "Look at me (doing this), Dad." it would mean something like "check out this website (and continue doing so for a nontrivial ...


3

~ている means "am currently doing" (Think v+ing in English) Dictionary form is more general. So in answer to your questions: 今食べています is I'm eating (literally in the act of doing). 今食べます works fine grammatically but it has a different meaning. If you were asked when you were going to eat, you could reply with 今食べます which would mean you are going to start ...


3

Yes, it is the -て form of ます. But it's a little more restricted, so you need to be a bit careful. To be polite, you normally only need to use the です/ます form for the final verb. Any other verbs can be in their normal -て form. But if you really want to be polite, then you can put the other verbs in their polite -ます form, obviously resulting in -まして. It is ...



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