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8

This question is trickier than it may appear to many J-learners and here is why. OP's first sentence means what s/he stated in English NOT only because 「て」 was used but also because the two activities happen to be those that could not take place simultaneously -- "brush teeth" and "eat". 「て」 can certainly signify the sequence of activities, but it can also ...


7

I think you're just missing what the source is referring to. The part where it says It is also used to describe a habitual action and a condition. Is referring to this: (2) The present progressive: the ~ te form iru or imasu (formal) So it's not referring to the て form but the ている/ています construction. So for example, 私はひまなとき本を読んでいます。 Note also ...


6

In this context, 「て」 = 「ても」. In informal speech, 「て」 is often used instead of 「ても」. What is 「ても」, then? It is a compound of two particles used to express "permission" or "tolerance". Both of the following phrases mean "It is OK to ~~", "It is OK if ~~" with the first one being more informal than the second. 「~~て(も)いい」 「~~て(も)かまわない」 Thus, your ...


6

The ~え is the casual form of elongating イ-adjectives into ~え. So in this case it is really 会いたい getting changed into 会いてえ. There may be another topic here about this form, but I can't find it. The ~ん is just the abbreviated ~の nominalizer. The same as ~んです.


6

The general rule is to write words with auxiliary function in kana, so it's usually written 働かなくてはいけない Searching the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ, 少納言, http://www.kotonoha.gr.jp/shonagon), なくてはいけない has 902 results from books, newspapers, blogs, etc., whereas なくては行けない has only 4 results from internet sources (3 from Yahoo! ...


5

You have pretty much answered your question. It could mean both the things you have stated depending on the tone of the leader's voice. Given the fact that one of the comrade responds 「は、はい……」, I take that the leader is saying "we have believed in the goddess and come this far haven't we?".


4

The basic meaning is the same as 渡さない. There are two differences: The focus particle は adds emphasis to the negative. In order to add the particle, the verb is split into two parts, 渡し+しない, with the particle added in between. The Western negative form せん (from せぬ) is used instead of the Eastern form しない. No, it doesn't mean "cross over a road or ...


4

「~~させ (causative verb form) + て + いただく」 expresses receiving the permission (or opportunity) to perform an action from another person. 「いただく」 = 「もらう」 in meaning. Former is only politer than the latter. 「[取]{と}らせていただいた」 means "I/We received the permission to take/collect ~~." One could also use as a translation "I/We had the pleasure of ...


4

The same thing any te form does. It's "continuative" and the part that comes after elaborates on that condition. So if you say あんな事聞かれて・・・ then whatever comes after will be in the context of having been asked such a question. So 聞かれて平常心でいられるか means that, having been asked such a thing, the speaker wonders if he/she/whoever is being asked will be able to stay ...


4

I think this よって comes from the verb 寄る{よる} which means "to visit, to drop by" in this case. Your sentence thus means: ゆうびんきょくによってかえります。 I'll drop by the post office and come back. ~によると is used as "according to" (see よると or よれば? Which one is "according to"?). ~によって can mean "by way/method", "depending on", "because of" (see What´s ...


4

The intransitive verb 届く (to reach) and the transitive verb 届ける (to convey, to deliver) are usually used with tangible objects such as letters. But it's also frequently used with words representing feelings. 感謝の気持ちを届ける convey the feelings of gratitude 君に届け Let (It) Reach You The second example is the title of a manga, and people can easily ...


4

"It's clear to me that [結婚]{けっこん}する is a change verb, but I'm not sure if 結婚する is transitive or intransitive." In Japanese, it is intransitive. You can only say 「Person + と + 結婚する」, never 「Person + を + 結婚する」. " All the dictionaries I've checked don't list 結婚する, just 結婚." Of course not, because 「結婚する」 is two words. For the sake of a smooth ...


4

The conjunctive form (aka pre-ます form) sounds more dry/learned/erudite/scholarly/formal. I hate all of those adjectives to describe it, but I think you know what I mean. It's of a higher register than the て form.


3

Its difficult to give a full translation of the sentence with the limited context you have given (and I was not sure what to make of your other notes) but, regarding the てーform: It links phrases. The link is usually to describe one of the following three things: (1) "Cause and effect"*, eg: お腹が痛くて、歩けない (2) Sequential actions, eg: 図書館へ行って、勉強した ...


3

しかし、平和はただではありません。何かを犠牲にして、その上で、平和は成り立っている。 昔は自分の可愛い子供達でした。 In parts, "しかし、平和はただではありません。" However, peace is not free. (natural English order: "Peace, however, is not free") Part 2: "何かを犠牲にして" "Something becomes a sacrifice" or "something is used as a sacrifice" Part 3: "その上で、平和は成り立っている。" "Through this, peace is made" Part 4: "昔は自分の可愛い子供達でした。" "In ...


3

聞いてた sounds like "Are you listening?" 聞いた is closer to "Did you hear about that?"


3

The verb is in its "stem form" because that's the form 〜すぎる attaches to. This is what Martin refers to as the excessive in his Reference Grammar of Japanese (p.434): You can attach すぎる to the infinitive [stem form] of most (probably all) verbals, to produce a new verbal, the EXCESSIVE form with the meaning 'overly' or 'all too (much, many, often)'. ...


3

If OP really wanted to make a distinction between みる and みます, then the te-forms would be: みる ⇒ みて みます ⇒ みまして 


3

If you are talking about [見]{み}ます/見る, the て-form is 見て。


3

Strictly speaking these two sentences have completely different meaning: 住んでいるのが好き。 - This means that you like the fact someone is living (somewhere). This could be you too, but that's not very clear way to tell it. Let's drop all the wrong usages of this phrase. 住むのが好き 。 - This means you like to live (somewhere).


3

The answer is basically no. You can express any progressive actions with (adverbal form) + つつある, which was created to translate exactly English progressive forms, though it's not frequently used in everyday conversation. Speaking how to translate the examples you suggested to common expressions, "My friend is going to Europe now":私の友達は今ヨーロッパへ向かっている "The ...


3

Usually, A-て B composition describes "do B with effect or result of A", that is, either A continues as long as B does (like your second one 輝いて見えた), or A completes when/before B starts. But I know, oddly enough, A sometimes accepts action of utterance that apparently too late for B's beginning. Some examples through quick Googling: ...


3

You have the general gist right, but the middle line is literally "I won't hand her over to anyone!" //watas-u// ⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊ //watas-i wa s-uru// ⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊ //watas-i wa s-en//  (≡ //watas-i wa s-enu// ≡ //watas-i wa s-inai//) The //-en// is the same thing you find in 「ません」, it's a more literary negative form. If the grammatical explanation ...


3

First, whether the main verb is 「[食]{た}べる」 or 「[行]{い}く」, the usages of 「~~たい」 and 「~~てみたい」 stay the same. If I said 「スペインに行ってみたい。」, what should you know as a listener? You should know that: 1) I am interested in going to Spain. And also that; 2) I have never been to Spain. ← This is an implied fact. From this simple sentence alone, however, ...


3

~たい expresses your desire to do something. ~てみる is used to express that you will try something (usually for the first time). so when you put them together, ~てみたい expresses that you want to try to do something for the first time. (which would imply that you will see if you like it or not). This works for all verbs. 夏休みに日本に行きたいです。 I want to go to Japan during ...


3

I would like to add a note on the implications of 〜てみたい. Consider the case of the verb 行く. In a simple sentence such as Xに行ってみたい, it may imply you have never been to X before. In general, however, it implies that the verbal action is in some sense something new to you, and that you'd like to experience it. Or in other words, if you are trying out something ...


2

Meh, I just asked my wife (native Japanese) for her opinion on this. I gave her four sentences and asked her to rank them by "naturalness". She says none of them are "wrong", but that the ~ている forms are much more natural sounding to her. I've marked their order of naturalness: (3)ここに住むのが好きです。 (1)ここに住んでいるのが好きです。 (4)ここに暮らすのが好きです。 (2)ここに暮らしているのが好きです。 I ...


2

Your guess is perfectly right. [EDIT for the update: the basic meaning of continuative forms is sequential occurrence, may or may not imply causality.] And the last part 大きく息を吐く describes a motion of deep breath (expiration). I think English speakers give "sigh of relief", too. Perhaps it's more understandable in English to merge the last te-form verb chain ...


2

Generally speaking, connecting two verbs like this using te-form indicates the two actions happens simultaneously, or the second one happens soon after the first one. 酔って運転する drive under the influence of alcohol, drink and drive 会って話す meet and talk 食べて寝る eat and sleep, go to bed just after eating 遊んで暮らす spend days in idleness In your ...



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