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8

That is 100% correct and natural; It just uses colloquial contractions. This sentence is written very informally as you could tell from the multiple し's. 出てった = 出ていった って = とて (とて means the same thing as としても = "even if".) This is not the quotative 「って」. 待ってて = 待っていて 私がここを出てったって待っててくれる人もいないし = "Even if I left here, there would be no one waiting for ...


6

In addition to what @Sjiveru said, it's probably also OK to use ○ 読ませていただきました ; ? お読みしました ○ 目を通しました (this might require some discretion, as it may make the email sound unimportant) ○ メール、確認させていただきました ; △ メールが届きました ○ 拝見しました (again, depending on how high up this superiour is)


6

ご飯を食べてから一緒に公園で/をさんぽしましょ。 ご飯を食べてから公園で/を一緒にさんぽしましょ。 ... both sound natural to me and I don't see much difference between them. You can also say ご飯の後で~~ ご飯を食べたら~~ ~~~一緒に公園にさんぽに行きましょ。 etc.


5

「くれて」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (continuative form) of the verb 「くれる」. 「くれる」 can be used by itself to mean "to give" or "to let one have" as in 「ケンちゃんがあめをくれた。」 = "Ken-chan gave me candies." The other usage of 「くれる」, which is what you are clearly referring to, is to express that you, the speaker, are the receiver of an action by another person. For this, ...


5

You can't directly use 〜たい if you are talking about other people's state of mind. You need to attach 〜がる (which attaches to the root of any i-adj). 泳ぐ - (I/he/she) swim(s) 泳ぎたい - I want to swim 泳ぎたがる - He/she (shows signs that he/she) wants to swim 泳ぎたがっている - He/she (is showing signs that he/she) wants to swim For the most part 〜たがる and 〜たがっている ...


5

There are two ways to form sentence conjunctions using 用言{ようげん} (inflectable words) in Japanese sentences: the て-form; e.g., 難しくて, 走って the 連用形{れんようけい}; e.g., 難しく, 走り It is called the 中止形{ちゅうしけい} when you use the 連用形 as a conjunction. Nuance-wise, using the 中止形 is a little more literary, so it can give a more formal feel to the sentence.


5

ないでいます conveys that not only one is not doing something, but also one has been in that state for a while (as in, one hasn't been doing it.) In comparison, ていません just says one is not doing something right now. Therefore ないでいます carries a bit of feeling that one is procrastinating, as in 近いうちに田舎に帰ろうと決めたのですが、できないでいます。(I decided to visit my home town but I ...


4

In general, a standalone TE-form of a verb can be a request. You can essentially think of it as 〜ください being assumed. In this specific case, it is 待っている that is being conjugated into TE-form, with the い getting omitted since it is casual speech:  知り合いもいるからちょっと待ってて =知り合いもいるからちょっと待っていてください


4

Are you talking about a website like Wiktionary? It appears that some sites which automatically generate conjugation charts treat "もっていく" as though it's a regular godan verb, but you're correct that it's もって + いく, and that いく conjugates as it normally does. It should be もっていって, not *もっていいて.


4

I am going to say just a couple of things regarding your first list of 5 meanings. I have been hesitating to do this because what I want to say might confuse the beginning students more than it could clarify things for them. 「Verb + ている」 is that subtle. After mentioning it in the comment some days ago, I am still having difficulty understanding why you ...


4

I think the 2nd is natural also. 1st is [一緒に]->[公園で散歩], 2nd is [公園で]->[一緒に散歩]. 1st strengthens "in the park", 2nd strengthens "with me". The pattern is "to place the word near a verb, if you want to make the word strongly connected with the verb." 映画を見た後で私と食事をしましょう proposes "to eat" or "to take a lunch", not to go to a park, etc. 映画を見た後で食事を私としましょう ...


3

「[待]{ま}ってろよ」is a colloquial contraction of 「待っていろよ」. It is the "tough guy" speech, so to speak. There is a difference in meaning between 「待て/待って」and「待って(い)ろ」. The former is the simple "Wait (a second)." while the latter means "You wait (there for a period of time) for me (or someone/something to arrive)." The latter is actually ordering one to "stay" ...


3

(@yadokari) Suppose that "I have been not eating" were correct English. Then it would suggest that I were in the prolonged state of "not eating", e.g. trying not to eat. "I haven't been eating" suggests that I happened not to be in the state of "eating" for some period of time. This may be coincidental. Although it takes some work to see the difference in ...


3

くださる is used when the -doer- is the one who needs honorifics, so that sentence makes it sound like you're exalting yourself above the listener. (It can be appropriate if you're talking about someone else having seen your email.) もらう has similar problems - -てもらう is used when someone else is doing the thing, so メールを見てもらった sounds like '[I] had [my] email read'. ...


3

This usage of いる is unrelated to its usual function as a grammar element. 〜ている 食事を食べている "I am eating my meal" (progressive) "I eat meals" (habitual) ?? "I eat my meal and I am here (/I exist)" (conjunction) Reading #3 is never used because no one would ever need to say that. I included it only to show that the て-form does normally perform a ...


3

First, let me write out the complete sentence you suggested: 私が結婚したかった人は、ほかの人と結婚してしまいました。 The topic of this sentence is 私が結婚したかった人. In this topic, the noun 人 ("the person") is modified by the relative clause 私が結婚したかった ("I wanted to marry"). The subject particle が links 私 to結婚したかった. Since it's part of a relative clause, it doesn't link up with other ...


2

A -て form is usually linked to its sentence. You cannot guess what is happening without the end. -郵便局行って - 帰る。 I'll pass by the post office and go home. - 帰った。 I passed by the post office then went gome. It is your second guess the correct one. インフルエンザが流行して、人が亡くなる心配がある They think/fear people are gonna die because the flu is spreading. Then, you ...


2

AないでB permits two readings, the 'means' reading (accomplish B by doing A), and the conjunction reading (A and B). AなくてB only permits the conjunction reading (A and B). Some painfully literal interpretations... 食べなくてください 'Not eat and give to me' 食べないでください 'Not eat and give to me' 'Give to me by not eating' I think it is the "Give to me by ...


2

THe は in ~てはいけない. Is actually not the topic marking particle, but a different particle entirely. IT's kind of like how the particle に has a number of different uses. In this case the は is used to emphasize the negative part of the sentence. You'll see in other places が being replaced by は before ない or another negative verb or adjective. Edit: I found some ...


2

It means "in preparation". It is generally used when the action in question is done as a preparatory action. In your example, a translation would be Before traveling, I am booking a hotel (in preparation). The general construction is ~ておく, and it gets conjugated like any other verb. For example: I booked a hotel in preparation for traveling. ...


2

A concise answer as per OP's request. xxx でいる = "to stay xxx", "to stay in the xxx situation", etc. The xxx part can be a whole mini-sentence as in OP's example, a noun, a 形容動詞 (as I dislike the word "na-adjective"), etc.   どっちが本当の自分か判断できないでいる = I have stayed unable to judge which one is real me. Finally, this form has very little to do with "Verb + ...


2

The tenses in V1て+V2 depend on what V1 and V2 are. General conjunction When V1 and V2 are both just normal verbs, such as: ジョンは走って食べた。 John-TOP run-TE ate-PAST "John ran and ate." the tense of V2 applies to V1 as well. V2 modifying V1 There are some V2s, such as いる、おく、しまう、もらう、くれる、あげる、ほしい which simply modify V1. (You can detect that you are ...


2

In this case the tense of the verb will be taken from あげた. あげた also tells you who did for whom. In a conversation where someone uses 教えてあげた with an implied 私は, the speaker "I told/taught" someone. Additionally, the common counter part for あげた would be もらった. In a conversation where someone said 教えてもらった with an implied 私は, the speaker was saying "I was ...


2

I would use メール(を)拝見(いた)しました。 I saw your email. メール(を)拝読(いた)しました。 I read your email. メール(を)拝受(いた)しました。 I received your email. for "I saw/read/received your mail". Using 電子メール is fine, but not really necessary. Maybe 電子メール is similar saying "electronic mail" in English. A more humble way of phrasing the first two would be ...


2

This kind of question is very good because it puts us on the spot in exactly the same way we often find ourselves in real life. Unfortunately, just like many questions on this site, we need to know a bit more about the context: Is it someone you deal with on a daily basis? If so then you will use the "politeness level" you use with them all the time - ...


2

You're right that it's shortened from 出て行ったって待っていて. There are two parts to the sentence: (私がここを出てったって) + (待っててくれる人もいないし... etc. etc.) The first part means "even if I leave here". This type of construction is formed by taking the past (た) and adding って. For an i-adjective like たかい, it would be たかくたって. You can also make it with nouns or na-adjectives by ...


1

You are correct in your understanding that ~てほしい is used when saying what you want others to do. 言われた is the passive, so the subject, literally, "was told 'I don't want you to go'". 行ってほしくない is what they were told by someone else. The main point of this passage is that the subject intends to go despite being told by someone that they don't want them to go. ...


1

As other people said, てろ is short for ていろ. I think there are mainly too ways to use it. It means "keep on doing/continue to do". It's used when the listener is already doing something, and you ask him to continue. I feel this is somewhat used rhetorically. It means you don't really want to stop him. It implies something might happen during (and might ...


1

泳ぎたい I want to swim The above can also be used for others in questions (with friends). 泳ぎたがる - she wants to swim (present tense) 泳ぎたがっている she is wanting to swim. (progressive tense) In many contexts, these two translate to the same English. The latter is the present progressive; the former is the present indicative. In Japanese, the present progressive ...



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