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7

I think you're just missing what the source is referring to. The part where it says It is also used to describe a habitual action and a condition. Is referring to this: (2) The present progressive: the ~ te form iru or imasu (formal) So it's not referring to the て form but the ている/ています construction. So for example, 私はひまなとき本を読んでいます。 Note also ...


5

The ~え is the casual form of elongating イ-adjectives into ~え. So in this case it is really 会いたい getting changed into 会いてえ. There may be another topic here about this form, but I can't find it. The ~ん is just the abbreviated ~の nominalizer. The same as ~んです.


5

[飲]{の}み[干]{ほ}す, [燃]{も}えゆく are compound verbs(複合動詞): 飲む + 干す >> 飲み干す, 燃える + 行く >> 燃えゆく 例: 死にゆく、食べ続ける、話し終える、飛び立つ、言い出す... ← continuative form(連用形) verb + verb Compare: 燃えてゆく(燃えていく) is made of the verb 燃える + the subsidiary verb(補助動詞) ゆく/いく(行く). 例: 死んでいく、食べてもらう、話してくれる、飛んでくる、言ってしまう... ← te-form verb + subsidiary verb


4

If OP really wanted to make a distinction between みる and みます, then the te-forms would be: みる ⇒ みて みます ⇒ みまして 


3

Its difficult to give a full translation of the sentence with the limited context you have given (and I was not sure what to make of your other notes) but, regarding the てーform: It links phrases. The link is usually to describe one of the following three things: (1) "Cause and effect"*, eg: お腹が痛くて、歩けない (2) Sequential actions, eg: 図書館へ行って、勉強した ...


3

しかし、平和はただではありません。何かを犠牲にして、その上で、平和は成り立っている。 昔は自分の可愛い子供達でした。 In parts, "しかし、平和はただではありません。" However, peace is not free. (natural English order: "Peace, however, is not free") Part 2: "何かを犠牲にして" "Something becomes a sacrifice" or "something is used as a sacrifice" Part 3: "その上で、平和は成り立っている。" "Through this, peace is made" Part 4: "昔は自分の可愛い子供達でした。" "In ...


3

If you are talking about [見]{み}ます/見る, the て-form is 見て。


3

The verb is in its "stem form" because that's the form 〜すぎる attaches to. This is what Martin refers to as the excessive in his Reference Grammar of Japanese (p.434): You can attach すぎる to the infinitive [stem form] of most (probably all) verbals, to produce a new verbal, the EXCESSIVE form with the meaning 'overly' or 'all too (much, many, often)'. ...


1

Meh, I just asked my wife (native Japanese) for her opinion on this. I gave her four sentences and asked her to rank them by "naturalness". She says none of them are "wrong", but that the ~ている forms are much more natural sounding to her. I've marked their order of naturalness: (3)ここに住むのが好きです。 (1)ここに住んでいるのが好きです。 (4)ここに暮らすのが好きです。 (2)ここに暮らしているのが好きです。 I ...


1

I raised a similar question about the tense of verbs modifying nouns, which I think also applies here - the only difference is that the nominaliser の is being modified instead of a regular noun. Other users can give their assessment of the answer which I got from a teacher of Japanese. Short answer: The plain and "past"/"perfect" stative verbs are more ...


1

The meaning of て行く is that something is happening now and continuing into the future. So すすんで行く would be an advance that has begun and will continue into the future, or a continual state of advancement. And with a quick check on Google Translate, さいて行く is "beginning to bloom". So your definition of "getting into the state of doing X" would be applicable in ...


1

Logically speaking is cause-effect, but I think it's actually a sequential action. At least looking at a literal translation. - You sacrifice something, and it's on that (sacrifice) that peace is founded(/arises).



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