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8

What decreases is the stock on hand. In other words, Maruko's mother is saying that, since people eat nori on so many occasions, one's supply runs out very quickly, and so one is happy to receive it. Think of a big pool of available nori that gets drained as it gets used.


5

Roughly speaking, 話す is close to talk or speak, and 言う is close to say. Sometimes they can be used interchangeably (like in your 千葉県の男性 example), but sometimes they are not. Saying just one word or two is not 話す. 話す is used with a relatively longer story, speech, opinion, lecture, etc. 話す is rarely used without physical vocals. You can safely use 言う for ...


4

いて is the casual imperative of いる (the same as the て-form). So it's now down to what つかまえている means. The て-form of a verb plus いる can have many different translations (and I'm sure you will find many applicable questions on Stack Enchange). I will attempt to distill it to its most general sense. The て-form plus いる conveys the state that the subject is in ...


4

That いて is the te-form of the subsidiary verb いる, followed by て. This subsidiary verb adds the meaning of "keep ~ing" in this case, since 捕まえる is a verb that describes an action. When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state? And a te-form at the end of a sentence can be a casual request. Using て form at the end of ...


4

「ろうそくが[置]{お}かれている。」 does not really mean "Candles are placed." as you stated. That would be 「ろうそくが置かれる。」. 「ろうそくが置かれている。」 can mean two different but related things. Passive Voice + Present Progress: "Candles are being placed." ← Someone is in the middle of placing candles. Passive Voice + State: "Candles have been placed." ← Candles were placed some ...


4

~ましてください is ungrammatical, because only one (in most cases, last) verb is allowed to take polite form per sentence to make that sentence polite. Since ください is already the polite form of くれ (くださる < くれる), no other polite verbs allowed. Strictly speaking, a sentence that consists of multiple coordinate clauses allows (or is recommended) to have polite form ...


1

This is a good question. I, a native speaker, have never thought of the difference. haha. According to here, also Japanese native speakers are confused about this, and I think the "next" answer is answering correctly. ( Although it's very long. ) This is the difference of veeeeryyyyy subtle nuance, though he is quoting the dictionary, 明鏡国語辞典 ...



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