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2

The 番 in 番号 is a part of the noun. The 番 in [何番]{なん・ばん} is a counter suffix ([助数詞]{じょ・すう・し}). Although these two 番s are same in kanji and pronunciation, their roles and nuances in a sentence are different. It's common for native Japanese speakers to use counter suffixes, even if it sounds repetitive in a sentence. For example, when someone goes to a bank ...


8

A. 電話{でんわ}番号{ばんごう}は何番{なんばん}ですか。(What is your phone number?) B. 今年{ことし}は何年{なんねん}ですか。(What year is this?) C. 好{す}きな色{いろ}は何色{なにいろ}ですか。(What is your favorite color?) D. この車{くるま}はあなたの車{くるま}ですか。(Is this your car?) All of these four sentences include a kind of duplication, but nobody feels that they are redundant. Perhaps you think that A, B, C ...


3

あなたの電話番号は何番ですか? is a common way of asking someone’s telephone number. We don’t have distinction of singular and plural form as you know. So its direct translation would be “What (number) is your telephone number? We don’t think it’s redundant. I think 貴方の電話, 何番ですか?is passable. But “貴方の電話番号は何ですか?” sounds weird and odd to me. You can also say ...


5

I think both of your sentences are occasionally used but the most common way of saying it is "電話番号を教えてください".


8

They are not grammatical phrases. We just read the symbols verbatim like: [⁠1]{いち} [+]{たす} [⁠2]{に} [=]{は} [⁠3]{さん} It has nothing different than saying: [⁠1]{いち} [+]{プラス} [⁠2]{に} [=]{イコール} [⁠3]{さん} which is also commonly heard. Though we have both [+]{たす/プラス} and [−]{ひく/マイナス}, [×]{かける} and [÷]{わる} only ...


4

「とってもまずしくて明日食べるパンもありません。」 = 「とってもまずしくて、明日食べるパンもありません。」 「[明日食]{あしたた}べる」 is a relative clause that modifies 「パン」. In the Japanese word order, the relative clause is placed in front of the noun that you want to give additional information to. In English, needless to say, it is the other way around -- "the bread that I (can) eat tomorrow". ...


2

サンタクロースをいつまで信じていたか事 Your intuition is correct, this phrase is ungrammatical. You must insert という or って (サンタクロースをいつまで信じていたかということ). According to a dictionary: 3 ある事物を例示して、次の語と同格であることを示す。…などという。「田中―人、知らない」「人間―ものはちっぽけなもんです」 So when なんて directly modifies a noun, you'd have to think of it as など + という. (田中など人 or 人間などもの are also ungrammatical)


2

Those two sentences show the most basic usage of the particle も. も is a marker which means "also". From Wikibooks (emphasis mine): The "also" marker も も is quite simply a marker that says "also". It replaces the particles は, が and を but can also follow other particles. This can also be used to form a large list of words all acting as though one of the ...


4

Yes, これ refers to かの筆にも言語にも言ひ尽し難き情趣の限なき振動のうちに幽かなる心霊の欷歔をたづね、縹渺たる音楽の愉楽に憧がれて自己観想の悲哀に誇る. Note that かの…誇る does not modify これ, but かの…誇る and これ are in apposition. What you got incorrectly is …に非ずや. や signifies a question, including a rhetorical question, which is the case here. So …に非ずや literally means …ではないか but it actually means …である.



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