New answers tagged

2

The first is translated as ビジネスクラスラウンジ「ザ・ピア」 of キャセイパシフィック航空 which is in 香港国際空港. The second is translated as ビジネスクラスラウンジ「ザ・ピア」 of キャセイパシフィック航空 is in 香港国際空港. The both are correct and the first one is a noun phrase, the second one is a sentence.


1

Judging from the all-kana sentence, I'm guessing that this is a beginner question, and as naruto answered, it means "Was Mr. Yamashita a child?" without any other context. That said, and just for the fun of scaring beginners, this sentence can also mean "Does Mr. Yamashita have children?", specifically "You, Mr. Yamashita, have children, right?" ...


1

「山下先生は子供でしたか?」 literally means "Was Mr. Yamashita a child?" or "Was Mr. Yamashita childish (at that time)?" 子供だ/子供です means being a child, not having a child, of course. 子供だ sometimes can metaphorically mean "childish". "Did Mr. Yamashita have a child?" is 「山下先生には子供がいましたか?」


2

This 「と」 indicates the standard for comparison (and how something can deviate from that standard). Standard: [表示]{ひょうじ}の[時刻]{じこく} "Times displayed" Possible deviation: [交通事情]{こうつうじじょう}により[前後]{ぜんご}する "May not arrive/depart on time due to traffic condition" 「交通事情により、表示の時刻と前後することがあります。」 In this sentence, the subject for the verb 「前後する」 is unmentioned. ...


3

These two even-if-clauses are simply placed in parallel ("Even if ~, (and) even if ~, I will keep waiting for you."). Effectively, this sentence is the following two sentences said together. たとえ夏にあなたに会えなくても、まだもっと待ってるよ。 たとえいっしょに旅しなくても、まだもっと待ってるよ。 (I feel this もっと is a bit weird, but let me keep it for now) You cannot combine these clauses into one using ...


2

Regarding the comments on your posted answer: I think @sombrero's examples may be confusing you because he uses です in two different ways. Let's start simply: これは犬{いぬ}です As for this, dog is This is a dog In this sentence です is indispensible. It means 'is'. Dog is a noun. Whenever we want to say something is a noun we use です. 私の日本語は下手です As for ...


2

In Japanese the conditional clause must come first so we need to say If my Japanese is impolite, I am sorry Let's look at 'if'. There are at least four different ways to make 'if'. The most suitable one here is たら (tara). This is formed by adding ら(ra) to the end of the plain past tense conjugation of the verb/copula. ...


2

片付く is intransitive and 片付ける is transitive, so they conjugate differently. 片付か is 未然形(nai form) of 片付く. And 片付く has some meaning, for example, 仕事が片付く(Works finish), 私の部屋は片付いている(My room is in good order.).



Top 50 recent answers are included