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2

Think like this: All nouns in Japanese are uncountable. You can't count apples any more than you count water or light. Thus under Japanese grammar you always have to say "two 'objects' of apple", "four 'sticks' of banana" and "seven 'bodies' of dog", as if they are "two bottles of water" or "four rays of light" etc. りんご一つ/一個 an object of apple = an ...


1

Without using counters, in general, you can't make it sure if it's trying to express natural numbers or ordinal ones. りんごを 一つ ください is valid because 一つ is an adverb here. リンゴ一つを ください is also valid because リンゴ一つ is a compound noun this time.


2

The following Wikipedia article on Japanese counter word explains well about how the counter words or counters (josūshi 助数詞) work in Japanese. In Japanese, as in Chinese and Korean, numerals cannot quantify nouns by themselves (except, in certain cases, for the numbers from one to ten; see below). For example, to express the idea "two dogs" in ...


3

There is no difference in meaning between 白い and しろい. Both are an adjective that can be used attributively and predicatively as in: 白い花 White flower 肌が白い Skin is white. You can read the Wikipedia article on Japanese writing system to understand which one to use in writing. Basically, kana is used when there is no corresponding kanji. 白 and ...


6

The former, かわいいのは私です is correct, and means "It is me who is cute." It's a cleft sentence made from a very simple sentence 私はかわいいです ("I am cute"). See this answer for details about cleft sentences. This の functions as a "placeholder", like it in "It is me who is cute." かわいい is a typical i-adjective, and it doesn't work as a no-adjective or a noun. かわいいの私です ...


1

As for the first question, you can simply explicitly indicate the subject in your second relative clause. 晩ご飯を食べなかったボブは、私が映画で見た銀行に行った。 Bangohan o tabenakatta bobu wa, watashi ga eiga de mita ginko ni itta. As for the second question, how a relative clause modifies the following noun depends on what is said or unsaid in the relative clause. Let's ...


4

It depends on what you're saying, but for something following this pattern, you would use の, e.g. 医者{いしゃ}の田中{たなか}はコーラを飲{の}む. You could also use である, which would make for a more "direct" translation: "医者{いしゃ}である田中{たなか}はコーラを飲{の}む." だ can never be used in the attributive position since it is only a copula; you must use である instead. Additionally, and this may ...


0

You are right. Using two nouns or phrases are expected when you refer to any relationship as follows. [鶏]{にわとり}と[卵]{たまご}の[関係]{かんけい} The relationship between chicken and egg. AとBの関係 or AとBは関係がある are broadly used. However, it doesn't necessarily mean you have to always use two nouns as either of them could be omitted or implied. It is quite common to ...


4

I think the sentence is about to explain how "IT" is correlated with 占い好き. And "IT" must be something in the previous sentences or paragraph. It is common to omit pronoun in some cases. The full sentence may be: なぜこれが占い好きと関係があるというと、、、


3

X は Y です Noun, Noun Phrase ⇒ X Adjective, Noun, Noun Phrase ⇒ Y かわいい by itself is an adjective, so it can't go into X ×「かわいいは私です」 - This is not OK If you add の you can make a noun phrase and put that before the noun at Y ○「かわいいのは私です」 - This is OK You can see more information about how の can be used to make noun phrases (nominalization) at ...


2

I think you are a bit confused about the nature of each of the particles you are discussing. は can be called the "topic marker", and is the particle that introduces (or marks) the topic being discussed. Many times this corresponds to what in English is called the "subject", although this is not always true (since I want to keep the discussion as basic as ...


1

If you do a very direct translation... きむらさんは・さくらだいがくの・がくせい・です。 as for Kimura-san / Sakura University's / student / (he) is きむらさんの・せんこうは・にほんご・です。 as for Kimura-san's major / Japanese Language / (it) is 「は」takes priority over「の」in the second example. I think you are correct in parsing the first example's usage of「さくらだいがくのがくせい」as "Sakura ...


6

Yes, the sentence is perfectly correct. The auxiliary (助動詞) 「れる/られる」 has four meanings: 「受け身」(passive), 「尊敬」(honorific), 「可能」(potential), and 「自発」(spontaneous). Here in your example, it is used as honorific. 総理大臣はヨーロッパを訪問されたくさんの国々の大統領に会われた。 is not the passive voice, but the honorific speech (尊敬語) of: 総理大臣はヨーロッパを訪問したくさんの国々の大統領に会った。 Which ...



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