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1

Counters for days also use Japanese numerals, from 2 to 10: ふつか, みっか, よっか... . 20th also uses a native counter: はつか. Some day numbers use mixed counters (14, 24): じゅうよっか, にじゅうよっか.


2

This だ is a copula. It's a plain form of the copula - copula has similar forms as verbs. You may know its polite form as well - です (warning though - です is not only a copula, it may also be just a marker of polite speech level). それはとってもいい話です。 is the polite version of the same sentence. Copula doesn't really act on the noun, rather it links the subject それ ...


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To answer your question specifically: それはとってもいい[話]{はなし}だ。 That, very good story is. If you did not have the だ at the end, its not quite clear if you have finished your sentence or what you are saying about the phrase "thats a good story". If you are stating it as a fact then you can say です or だ or just end with nothing. If its just something you think then ...


1

This is just a thought that is too long for a comment but based on the following 水割り seems to be the natural order: To dilute with water = 水で割る ー> 水割り To take a 1/10th, or 10% = 一割 (same order); 15%= 一割5分 (seems logical) If we look at other words containing 割り then the order they come is consistent with what you would expect in long form, eg: ...


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-i form of a verb, among other things, can be used to form nouns that are derived from this verb. For example to discount (v) -> discount (n): 割り{わり}引く{びく} -> 割引{わりびき} to rest/to have take a day off (v) -> rest/holiday (n): 休{やす}む -> 休{やす}み to apply (v) -> application (n): 申{もう}し込{こ}む -> 申{もう}し込{こ}み So I believe this is not the case of a verb form being ...


4

That is clearly two sentences and you divided it correctly at the end of 「[私一人]{わたしひとり}でいい」. 「[闘]{たたか}い」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} of the verb 「闘う」 and it has the same meaning as 「闘って」, the inexplicably popular form among Japanese-learners. 「闘い」 is surely more formal than 「闘って」 but it is NOT for literary use only as you seem to have learned incorrectly ...


1

↔ ⇔, etc. are not a part of Japanese. Convention. Turn to the 「凡例」 part of any dictionary and you will find the the notation and convention it uses. Obviously, there are differences among them. 大辞泉・凡例 5. 語義解説の末尾には対義語・対語を↔で示した。 あが・る【上がる/揚がる/挙がる】…↔おりる。 だい‐じょう【大乗】…↔小乗。 6. 参照する項目などについては、語義解説の末尾に → で示した。 あい‐そ【愛想】…→愛嬌(あいきよう)[用法] 7. ...


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These arrows aren't part of the Japanese language, and therefore aren't part of Japanese syntax. They're written symbols, and they aren't used to correspond to any particular spoken utterance. If you did consider ⇔ or ↔ syntactically, you could call it a unary prefix operator, taking a single operand which follows the operator itself: ⇔はやい Although ...


1

Symbols like ⇔ and ↔ are, well, just symbols. They are formal enough that Unicode assigns distinctive code points, but it's certainly not in the same league as ひらがな or かたかな, and I wouldn't consider them to be a part of the syntax of Japanese. Dictionaries almost always develop their own shorthand notations to pack more information into the same amount of ...



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