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9

There are a few simple ways to express this. 「~~と(or に)+ [似]{に}ている」 = "similar to ~~" 「~~の + よう + です/だ/である」 = "like ~~" 「~~みたい + です/だ/である」 = "just like ~~" To use a slightly bigger word, one could say: 「~~と + [同様]{どうよう} + です/だ/である」 = "(very) similar to ~~" For the negative forms of the phrases above, make the following changes: 似ている ⇒ ...


7

Yes, but there are multiple ways to say it. Just off the top of my head, I can think of at least these: 聴衆の前に立ち、新製品の発表を行った 聴衆の前に立って、新製品の発表を行った 聴衆の前に立ちつつ、新製品の発表を行った 聴衆の前に立ちながら、新製品の発表を行った Some of them has subtle nuances that others don't have, but I think all of them are more or less interchangeable.


7

These Romance language concepts simply do not apply to Japanese. In addition to the points made in a comment by Zhen Lin, Japanese does not have genders, and its nouns are indeclinable. Its verbs do not conjugate for grammatical person either. Japanese also does not have a grammatical requirement to supply subjects or pronouns with verbs. The way to ...


6

ご飯を食べてから一緒に公園で/をさんぽしましょ。 ご飯を食べてから公園で/を一緒にさんぽしましょ。 ... both sound natural to me and I don't see much difference between them. You can also say ご飯の後で~~ ご飯を食べたら~~ ~~~一緒に公園にさんぽに行きましょ。 etc.


5

Using ため as the 'for' in 'thank you for' is strange. Off the top of my head I can think of 4 ways we normally use ありがとう to say thanks for something. masu-stem of the verb + ありがとう (this one's particularly formal) メールアドレスを教えていただき有難う御座います。 Thank you for telling me your email address. te-form of the verb + ありがとう メールアドレスを教えてくれてありがとう。 Thanks for ...


5

I've found several webpages online which talk about the sentence 黒い髪のきれいな女の子 as a famous example of an ambiguous sentence. (For example, this blog post). Here are a couple ways in which this sentence could be considered ambiguous: 女の子 could mean a female child or a woman's child. 黒い could modifies 髪, meaning black hair, or it could modify (髪のきれいな)女, ...


5

It's something along the lines of: Today I realized what is really meant by the woeful words, "it shows when you have not practiced". I know it shows when one has practiced; but, the opposite is also very true. Basically, 実感 means that one has "actually (実) experienced/felt (感)" something.


5

The first の is the pronoun の. The second の is the genitive の. There are two possible sequences of these two のs: genitive + pronoun:  この本は花子ののだ。 "This book is Hanako's." pronoun + genitive:  赤いのの表紙 "the cover of the red one" In the former, the sequence of two のs is ungrammatical; you have to delete one of them. In the latter, the sequence of ...


4

I think the 2nd is natural also. 1st is [一緒に]->[公園で散歩], 2nd is [公園で]->[一緒に散歩]. 1st strengthens "in the park", 2nd strengthens "with me". The pattern is "to place the word near a verb, if you want to make the word strongly connected with the verb." 映画を見た後で私と食事をしましょう proposes "to eat" or "to take a lunch", not to go to a park, etc. 映画を見た後で食事を私としましょう ...


4

That is clearly two sentences and you divided it correctly at the end of 「[私一人]{わたしひとり}でいい」. 「[闘]{たたか}い」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} of the verb 「闘う」 and it has the same meaning as 「闘って」, the inexplicably popular form among Japanese-learners. 「闘い」 is surely more formal than 「闘って」 but it is NOT for literary use only as you seem to have learned incorrectly ...


4

In this case, エホバに関する is a relative clause, so it modifies the following noun phrase. Since どんな is not by itself a noun, we can conclude that it's part of a larger noun phrase. In this case, the only possible such noun phrase is どんな事実. Note that unlike English, Japanese doesn't have a distinct class of words called determiners which terminate the ...


4

First of all, welcome to this forum! This is a great question (yet, at the same time, is quite a broad question when this part is included: "What does it have that French/English don't and what is similar.") So, here is a brief attempt to explain at least a few of the differences (specifically having to do with gender, article, and verb conjugation,) ...


4

Separating words in a sentence, at least when done by computer, is called segementation (分かち書き) or tokenization (トーケン化). When using an IME to input Japanese, when you hit the spacebar to convert the kana to kanji, the IME has to segment whatever it is that you typed, then use a dictionary to replace the kana with it's kanji. As you've probably learned by ...


3

First example: Your misunderstanding as Earthling points out Second example: Ending a sentence with a noun or noun phrase, which is very common in Japanese poetry or lyrics Third example: Grammatically correct, though it uses the techniques like inversion of the word order and ending a sentence with a noun I think, generally speaking, Japanese language, ...


2

It might be easier to understand the usage if you think of ため as "for the sake of (smb/smth)". 会社{かいしゃ}のために働{はたら}く Work in interests of the company [=for the sake of the company] 彼女{かのじょ}は娘{むすめ}のためなら何でもやる She will do anything for her daughter. [=for the sake of her daughter] 正義{せいぎ}のために In the cause of justice [=for the sake of justice] ...


2

Yes, 次第に modifies 少なくなり in that sentence, nothing else. One cannot say 次第に登校する in the first place anyway because "going to school = 登校する" is not something one can do "little by little = 次第に". 次第に少なくなる, however, is a natural-sounding phrase because the number of something (students in this case) CAN decrease little by little. You are also correct in ...


2

I never did figure out what the right answer was in traditional grammar, but I ended up reading in a linguistics paper somewhere that this is a complementizer. In other words, it turns a clause into a complement of the following verb. In your example, it turns どこにある into an interrogative complement of the verb 知っています:  1. デパートはどこにあるか?  As ...


2

I think the confusion arises because です can both replace だ as the copula (行きたかったんです), or simply mark politeness (行きたかったです). The correction you received has little to do with a grammatical need for だ or です in a sentence, but rather the two improved versions sound more natural. Grammatically speaking, ドイツはいちども行ったことがないから、ずっと行きたかった。 is perfectly fine. ...


2

I think that you are looking for written expressions in Japanese which are ambiguous at some level. Of course, an easy way to get ambiguity in written text is by using homographs, which is often resolved by considering the meanings: 書の[大家]{たいか} authority of caligraphy アパートの[大家]{おおや} the owner of apartment 彼女は京都に[行]{い}った。 She went to Kyoto. ...


2

I'm looking to test some Morphological Analysis tools, which split sentences into tokens and provide part of speech and pronunciation information. One of the beauties of Japanese is that there is no need for "pronunciation information". No diphthongs, "silent e", etc. Knowing the 振り仮名 is enough. Anyway, not sure of your purpose, but how about this old ...


2

Historically が and の had a much closer relationship. This relationship can still be observed in some modern words like 我が国, "our country". In this word が is a genitive marker and basically has the same function as modern Japanese の. In modern Japanese が and の can't be used interchangeably, but の can still replace が in modifying clauses. Because languages ...


2

In these phrases, の and が are indeed 100% interchangeable as far as grammatical correctness is concerned. Native speakers, however, often prefer using の because to us, の simply sounds softer and nicer than が. In "properly spoken Japanese", the 「が」 in phrases such as [人気]{にんき}が[高]{たか}い and [柔軟性]{じゅうなんせい}がある、should be pronounced using the velar nasal G ...


2

This だ is a copula. It's a plain form of the copula - copula has similar forms as verbs. You may know its polite form as well - です (warning though - です is not only a copula, it may also be just a marker of polite speech level). それはとってもいい話です。 is the polite version of the same sentence. Copula doesn't really act on the noun, rather it links the subject それ ...


1

This is just a thought that is too long for a comment but based on the following 水割り seems to be the natural order: To dilute with water = 水で割る ー> 水割り To take a 1/10th, or 10% = 一割 (same order); 15%= 一割5分 (seems logical) If we look at other words containing 割り then the order they come is consistent with what you would expect in long form, eg: ...


1

-i form of a verb, among other things, can be used to form nouns that are derived from this verb. For example to discount (v) -> discount (n): 割り{わり}引く{びく} -> 割引{わりびき} to rest/to have take a day off (v) -> rest/holiday (n): 休{やす}む -> 休{やす}み to apply (v) -> application (n): 申{もう}し込{こ}む -> 申{もう}し込{こ}み So I believe this is not the case of a verb form being ...


1

↔ ⇔, etc. are not a part of Japanese. Convention. Turn to the 「凡例」 part of any dictionary and you will find the the notation and convention it uses. Obviously, there are differences among them. 大辞泉・凡例 5. 語義解説の末尾には対義語・対語を↔で示した。 あが・る【上がる/揚がる/挙がる】…↔おりる。 だい‐じょう【大乗】…↔小乗。 6. 参照する項目などについては、語義解説の末尾に → で示した。 あい‐そ【愛想】…→愛嬌(あいきよう)[用法] 7. ...


1

These arrows aren't part of the Japanese language, and therefore aren't part of Japanese syntax. They're written symbols, and they aren't used to correspond to any particular spoken utterance. If you did consider ⇔ or ↔ syntactically, you could call it a unary prefix operator, taking a single operand which follows the operator itself: ⇔はやい Although ...


1

Symbols like ⇔ and ↔ are, well, just symbols. They are formal enough that Unicode assigns distinctive code points, but it's certainly not in the same league as ひらがな or かたかな, and I wouldn't consider them to be a part of the syntax of Japanese. Dictionaries almost always develop their own shorthand notations to pack more information into the same amount of ...


1

Your main issue seems to be how Japanese can tell the difference between "これを見た電車の中で" and "これを見た。電車の中で". Well, uh, they can tell because in the latter case the two sentences are separated by a period (in writing), or by a pause (when spoken). You could just as easily come up with any number of examples in English where two phrases mean one thing when they ...



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