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7

This 〜た is the perfect, not past; that is, it's indicating a time before some reference time, rather than a time before speech time: 傘を持っていったほうがいい。 Lit. "Having brought an umbrella would be better." That said, I don't think native speakers actually have such a complicated model (of comparing possible future worlds, one of which where you have brought ...


7

No, that's a ren’yōkei 連用形。 A ren’yōkei mid-sentence is for coordination, like English “he sat, and…”. You can think of it as a literary equivalent of 「こしをかけて、。。。」 Kateikei is what comes before -ba, so in this case it would be kakere-. Full table, with sample context: 未然形: 掛け-  kake- (-nai) 連用形: 掛け-  kake- (-masu) 終止形: 掛ける kake-ru (yo.) 連体形: 掛ける- ...


6

To match the tone of "woe" and the slightly older sounding English of the original, why not? 沼地に近寄る者に災いあれ Your それらのための災いは誰が沼に行きます Is, I'm sorry to say, mostly nonsensical: "disasters for the benefit of those, who goes to the swamp?"


6

Both are 100% grammatical; That is for sure. There is, however, a slight difference in nuance between the two. It is so slight that I probably would not mention it if I were teaching a beginning or intermediate learner. Both mean "Which one is your pen?" The difference is in the main focus. 1) どれがあなたのペンですか? focuses more on the "which one" part. ...


5

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you're trying to say something like Please feel free to contact me again. Maybe? From your choice of 僕, I'm guessing this is not necessarily an overly formal context. お好きに is not used like that. (Did you get this from お好きにどうぞ?) Depending on context and tone, もしよかったら or お気軽に or いつでも might be usable, although I ...


5

You can parse it like this: 初めは[{(番組を編成する際の)穴埋め}として]放映されていたのだが、 番組を編成する際の modifies 穴埋め, "fillers (between programs) used when editing TV programs / planning program schedule." So I think it's like "In the beginning, anime were broadcasted as fillers inserted when organising TV programmes, but..." 番組の数が増え、年月を経るうちに、 as they(=TV programs) grew in ...


5

The easiest and most commonly-used structure for expressing: "come/go/return, etc. + in + (time period) " would be to use particle 「で」 and say: 「(time period) + で + [来]{き}ます/[行]{い}きます/[戻]{もど}ります, etc.」 This would by far be the most versatile way of expressing "in (a time period)" Other expressions: 「(time period) + [後]{ご}に + (verb phrase)」 ...


5

This is a simple case of subclauses - you've still got one を per clause: [この道を[靴を履かずに]歩けますか。] 靴 is the object of 履かず, 道 is the object* of 歩けます. *Depending on your interpretation of を with what you would think are intransitive verbs. You can read more about these sorts of cases here: It seems that 渡る is categorized as 自動詞 (intransitive verb), yet it is ...


5

みなりのポケットの中には、ボールペンを二本あります。 There are two pens in the dress' pocket. [身]{み}なり refers to how you are dressed, your appearance, etc. Use ドレス for dress as in long dress or wedding dress, 服 or 洋服 for general clothes. を is used to indicate an object; use the subject particle が since the ボールペン is the subject of あります. あります would be fine but 入っています would be ...


5

「と」 here is a quotative particle used to quote 「ふん」; It is not an abbreviation of anything. 「と」, all by itself, is in its full form. It may look like 「と」 is at the beginning of the sentence, but in essence, it is the same as: 「ふん」と、彼女は鼻を鳴らし、中学の制服である・・・・ A direct quote, no matter how short it is, is often treated as a full line in stories, which is what ...


5

There's no implicit order which word you should use for stacking sections. You can (basically) freely choose linking words for you additional sections. A non-exhaustive list is: 次{つぎ}に, 更{さら}に(は), そして, それから, その上{うえ}(に), この上{うえ}(に), 加{くわ}えて, それに加{くわ}え(て), 他{ほか}に(も), また, 並{なら}びに, および, それだけでなく, のみならず etc. etc. Variations for "firstly" and "finally" are: ...


4

The meaning of this sentence is the same as those with で/であり. Omitting certain verbs such as だ/です makes this sentence sound somewhat more rhythmical and crisp. I think this is at least closely related to so-called 体言【たいげん】止【ど】め, a common rhetorical technique in which a sentence is ended with a noun.


4

My answer will be based on the assumption that OP is talking about when 「なんか」 is indeed followed, not preceded, by a noun as s/he so states in the comments (but not in the question). In informal conversation, there actually exists such a structure. "なんか + Noun + みたいな(のような) + Noun" For instance, I have little appetite when I have a fever. Since I do ...


4

The suffix た does not automatically imply past tense. In this free online dictionary, for instance, it lists 8 different meanings /usages of 「た」. https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%81%9F-556028#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 Sure, you may not be able to read it, but it would at least give you a good sign that you should forget about ...


4

図書館でいろいろな教室でできないことができる。 This is not grammatically wrong, but a little hard to understand. いろいろな教室でできないこと sounds like 'things you can't do in various classrooms' (The いろいろな looks like modifying 教室). If you mean 'In the library, you can do various things you can't do in the classroom' then you can say 図書館では、教室で(は)できないことがいろいろできる。 or ...


4

これはAで、Bではありません。 means 'This is A, not B.' This is similar to これはBではなく、Aです。(This is not B, but A). これはAですが、Bではありません。(This is A, but not B.) So これらは "Yes, I'm following you; please continue."という意味で、"Yes, I agree." という意味ではありません。 means 'This means "Yes, I'm following you; please continue" and NOT "Yes I agree".' You would say ...


4

「Verb in [連用形]{れんようけい} + て + の + Noun」 is a phrase pattern in which the "Verb + て + の" part describes the condition that generates what is expressed by the following noun. 「“[昭和]{しょうわ}な[顔]{かお}”を[買]{か}われての[起用]{きよう}」 means: "casting based upon his reputation as having the 'Showa-esque face'" 「買われる」 here means "to be regarded highly". (I am not ...


4

It is a description of the period of time when this happened. "During the time I was in elementary school". 小学校に居る modifies 時分. During which period did this happen? During the period when I was in school.


4

「~~させ (causative verb form) + て + いただく」 expresses receiving the permission (or opportunity) to perform an action from another person. 「いただく」 = 「もらう」 in meaning. Former is only politer than the latter. 「[取]{と}らせていただいた」 means "I/We received the permission to take/collect ~~." One could also use as a translation "I/We had the pleasure of ...


4

As a whole sentence, 「士郎の理想、英雄となった姿」 is the long subject phrase. If I have to narrow down, 理想 and 姿 are the two parallel subjects. According to this Wikipedia article, this tweet, and this page, this question is made in a special context. Here, the speaker is talking to Archer, who is supposed to be the reincarnation of Shirou, who wanted to became a hero. ...


4

Probably, you recognise each of the words "[顔]{かお}" and "[表]{あらわ}す", don't you? "顔に表す" is a phrase which means that someone shows his feelings on his face obviously. So, this sentence denotes, "The speaker never fails to show his sarcasm on his face."


4

Your translation is correct. The sentence parses thus: ...新商品を お試しくださいます よう ご案内申し上げます。 So the ます is not separate at all. The first verb is in fact お試しくださいます. The pattern verb X + よう(に)+ verb Y means that Y happens for/so that X happens. 彼に電話するように言ってください。 → Please tell him (that he should / to) call me. (Inside train/subway cars as they ...


4

Don't mix だ/である style and です/ます style. Replace 今から (from now) with ひとまず (for now; putting that aside). Use も (also; too) instead of を so that you can clarify your intention. 見てみましょう (take a look) is better than simple 見ましょう here. (optional) 定義を与える sounds like a literal translation. Consider 定義を述べる. この言葉について私自身の定義を述べますが、ひとまず、異なるシナリオも見てみましょう。 ...


4

Recently, @naruto mentioned the phrase 頭が赤い魚を食べた猫, which can be understood in many ways. There is some ambiguity in how each word relates to each other. Among other possibilities, it could mean [(頭が赤い)魚]を食べた猫 (red-headed fish) [(頭が赤い)+(魚を食べた)]猫 (red-headed cat) The same applies here. Consider the following pattern: AとBとCのD As far as logic and ...


4

「いつか日本に行きます。」 sounds the most natural. You could insert a comma if you like to put in a pause:「いつか、日本に行きます。」 and it will be equally correct grammar. Japanese does not usually need or use a pronoun; rather, the pronoun is, in most cases, implied. If you do not include 「私は」, it is clear to the listener that you must be talking about yourself since you did ...


3

「[彦一]{ひこいち}さんがのこった[荷物]{にもつ}を[見]{た}たときは、[皆]{みな}の[握]{にぎ}り[飯]{めし}が[入]{はい}っているお[弁当]{べんとう}など[重]{おも}そうなものしか[残]{のこ}っていませんでした。」 The part in bold only gives an example of the 「重そうなもの」. ≒ 「重そうなもの」 such as 「皆の握り飯が入っているお弁当」 My own TL: "When Hikoichi saw the remaining belongings, there was nothing but some heavy-looking stuff like everyone's riceballs left." ...


3

There are a number of ways to express this. Roughly in the order of informality, those include: 「~~すれば + Potential form of verb。」 「~~すれば + Verb in dictionary form + ことができる。」 「~~することで + Noun (or "Verb + こと") + が[可能]{かのう}になる。」 「~~することにより (or によって) + Noun (or "Verb + こと") + が可能になる。」 「~~することにより (or によって) + Noun + が[達成]{たっせい}できる。」 To use one of your ...


3

「[一気]{いっき}にこれ[以上修業]{いじょうしゅぎょう}したって[意味]{いみ}はないって。[限界]{げんかい}までやったんだ。」 "As far as I know, the second って means と言っている and is used to insist on what precedes it, like : "And I'm telling you that..." in english. Am I right here?" Right. The second って is quotative, implying "Here is what I want to say and I know what I'm talking about.". "As for the ...


3

Hope this does not shock you too badly. If anything, it is at least an honest opinion of a native speaker. Regardless of one's intended meaning and/or nuance, it sounds much more natural to say: 1.「日本語はアメリカ人には難しいと思います。」 than to say: 2.「日本語はアメリカ人に難しいと思います。 」 To be even more honest, my ears do not accept Sentence #2. Sure, I could easily guess ...



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