Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

There are a few simple ways to express this. 「~~と(or に)+ [似]{に}ている」 = "similar to ~~" 「~~の + よう + です/だ/である」 = "like ~~" 「~~みたい + です/だ/である」 = "just like ~~" To use a slightly bigger word, one could say: 「~~と + [同様]{どうよう} + です/だ/である」 = "(very) similar to ~~" For the negative forms of the phrases above, make the following changes: 似ている ⇒ ...


9

It's not a mistake, it's just a stylistic choice. They do it all the time: 長野)松本山雅がホーム初勝利 岐阜に1―0 愛媛)愛媛FC、松本山雅に競り負け 4戦白星なし 岐阜)船来山古墳群、国史跡へ調査本腰 近畿外で最大級 長野)SKF、バレエ二山さんと共演へ 9月 青森)原発の電源喪失防げ 東北電が送電線工事公開 茨城)原電がウェブで資料公開 東海第二の安全審査巡り 長野)上高地で開山祭 観光シーズン本番に I only spent about 30 seconds looking through headlines to find these examples—I'm not ...


8

If you're sure you'll die and I'll read your letter after your death, then you'd say: あなたがこの手紙を読むころには、私はもう死んでいるでしょう。 あなたがこの手紙を読んでいるころには、私はもう死んでいるでしょう。 (Literally: I will already be dead when you read this letter.) If I won't read your letter if you survive, then you'd say: あなたがこの手紙を読んでいるということは、私はもう死んでいるということでしょう。 ...


7

Yes, but there are multiple ways to say it. Just off the top of my head, I can think of at least these: 聴衆の前に立ち、新製品の発表を行った 聴衆の前に立って、新製品の発表を行った 聴衆の前に立ちつつ、新製品の発表を行った 聴衆の前に立ちながら、新製品の発表を行った Some of them has subtle nuances that others don't have, but I think all of them are more or less interchangeable.


6

ご飯を食べてから一緒に公園で/をさんぽしましょ。 ご飯を食べてから公園で/を一緒にさんぽしましょ。 ... both sound natural to me and I don't see much difference between them. You can also say ご飯の後で~~ ご飯を食べたら~~ ~~~一緒に公園にさんぽに行きましょ。 etc.


6

I see two big problems with your sentence: In your sentence, 受けている doesn't relate in a natural way to what follows. 楽{たの}しい is an adjective, but you're conjugating it as though it's the non-existent verb 楽{たの}す. (Actually, because the kanji are the same, it looks like a form of 楽{らく}する, but I don't think that's what you intended.) I think you could ...


6

The first が is not a subject particle. In combination with 「...う」 and/or 「まい」, it means "no matter", or "regardless of". Here is an excerpt from スーパー大辞林{だいじりん}: (4)どんな事柄{ことがら}でもかまわない,の意{い}を表{あらわ}す。「…うが」「…まいが」の形{かたち}をとる。「どうなろう―知{し}ったことではない」「行{い}こう―行{い}くまい―,君{きみ}の勝手{かって}だ」 The first example can be translated to: "No matter how it becomes, I do not give a ...


5

It's something along the lines of: Today I realized what is really meant by the woeful words, "it shows when you have not practiced". I know it shows when one has practiced; but, the opposite is also very true. Basically, 実感 means that one has "actually (実) experienced/felt (感)" something.


5

I've found several webpages online which talk about the sentence 黒い髪のきれいな女の子 as a famous example of an ambiguous sentence. (For example, this blog post). Here are a couple ways in which this sentence could be considered ambiguous: 女の子 could mean a female child or a woman's child. 黒い could modifies 髪, meaning black hair, or it could modify (髪のきれいな)女, ...


5

Using ため as the 'for' in 'thank you for' is strange. Off the top of my head I can think of 4 ways we normally use ありがとう to say thanks for something. masu-stem of the verb + ありがとう (this one's particularly formal) メールアドレスを教えていただき有難う御座います。 Thank you for telling me your email address. te-form of the verb + ありがとう メールアドレスを教えてくれてありがとう。 Thanks for ...


5

お忘れなく means 忘れずに or 忘れないで, don't forget. It's the negative form of an honorific form of 忘れる. Here is the definition of お/ご~ある/ない in the dictionary: ある 動詞の連用形や動作性の漢語名詞などに付いて、多く「お…ある」「御(ご)…ある」の形で、その動作をする人に対する尊敬を表す。「おいで―・れ」「御笑覧―・れ」 More examples: お忘れなく -> 忘れないで お構いなく -> 構わないで ご遠慮なく -> 遠慮しないで ご心配なく -> 心配しないで お咎めなく -> 咎めないで お見逃しなく -> ...


5

The first の is the pronoun の. The second の is the genitive の. There are two possible sequences of these two のs: genitive + pronoun:  この本は花子ののだ。 "This book is Hanako's." pronoun + genitive:  赤いのの表紙 "the cover of the red one" In the former, the sequence of two のs is ungrammatical; you have to delete one of them. In the latter, the sequence of ...


5

To match the tone of "woe" and the slightly older sounding English of the original, why not? 沼地に近寄る者に災いあれ Your それらのための災いは誰が沼に行きます Is, I'm sorry to say, mostly nonsensical: "disasters for the benefit of those, who goes to the swamp?"


4

That is clearly two sentences and you divided it correctly at the end of 「[私一人]{わたしひとり}でいい」. 「[闘]{たたか}い」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} of the verb 「闘う」 and it has the same meaning as 「闘って」, the inexplicably popular form among Japanese-learners. 「闘い」 is surely more formal than 「闘って」 but it is NOT for literary use only as you seem to have learned incorrectly ...


4

もん = a colloquial version of もの in this case, this is in the expression というもの かも = a colloquial version of かもしれない it means "probably" and is a construction often used to soften what one says before.


4

I think the 2nd is natural also. 1st is [一緒に]->[公園で散歩], 2nd is [公園で]->[一緒に散歩]. 1st strengthens "in the park", 2nd strengthens "with me". The pattern is "to place the word near a verb, if you want to make the word strongly connected with the verb." 映画を見た後で私と食事をしましょう proposes "to eat" or "to take a lunch", not to go to a park, etc. 映画を見た後で食事を私としましょう ...


4

I think you can say it like this: おはようございます!ピクニックでリナさんを探していたんですが、どこにも*見え**ませんでしたね。(polite) *どこも→どこにも **The 見える is the honorific form of いる(居る), and its subject (=リナさん) is implied. To avoid the confusing with 「(私がリナさんを)見えませんでした」(見える = potential form of 見る), you can rephrase it as 「どこにもいらっしゃらなかったですね。」, using いらっしゃる which is another honorific form of いる. ...


4

In this case, エホバに関する is a relative clause, so it modifies the following noun phrase. Since どんな is not by itself a noun, we can conclude that it's part of a larger noun phrase. In this case, the only possible such noun phrase is どんな事実. Note that unlike English, Japanese doesn't have a distinct class of words called determiners which terminate the ...


4

We spent a while talking about this on chat tonight, and I think I understand a little better now thanks to Chocolate and Yang Muye. So I'm going to try to write up the conclusions I came to in an answer. Rules for だい and かい I think the description given in the grammar dictionaries is fairly accurate for today's Japanese, but it may be a bit of a ...


4

I'm not good at explaining grammar but I think I can at least tell you which particles I would use if I were to say your sentences: 1.春にはorはたくさん雨が降る。 ... which is like "In spring/As for spring, we have a lot of rain," since neither 春に~~ or 春で~~ sounds natural here, although you would use に when you say: 京都では、春にたくさん雨が降る。In Kyoto, it rains a lot in ...


3

I think the confusion arises because です can both replace だ as the copula (行きたかったんです), or simply mark politeness (行きたかったです). The correction you received has little to do with a grammatical need for だ or です in a sentence, but rather the two improved versions sound more natural. Grammatically speaking, ドイツはいちども行ったことがないから、ずっと行きたかった。 is perfectly fine. ...


3

Your example sentence I think is a little clumsy, but short answer: yes. と in a case similar to your example would just be a component in one of the noun phrases that makes up your list. For the sentence, however, 趣味はスキーやゴルフ、英語と日本語の勉強、カラオケなどです would be better. Points to take away: 趣味は not 趣味が. When making longer lists of things, Japanese typically works, ...


3

Xがする is a phrasal verb and is most often used in phrases such as 音がする and 匂い{におい}がする and even 気がする. It is used with words that are about perceiving or sensing something. (More phrasal verbs here.) Yet it does not really require the actual sensing part from the part of the speaker, but instead is a pretty objective way of saying that 'there is a smell' or ...


3

Chinese-derived numbers might be more common (although I don't know by what margin), but native-Japanese counter words are also ubiquitous. To quote the first page (of 319 pages) from the counter word dictionary 数え方の辞典, アース ▲本 アーチ ▲本 アーティチョーク ▲本 ●株【かぶ】 ▲個 アーム ▲本 アーモンド ●粒 ▲個 合い鍵 ▲本 アイコン ▲個 挨拶 ...


3

If you must use ものだ/もんだ, I'd suggest 日本語の授業を受けるのは楽しいものだ(よ)。 日本語の授業を受けるのは楽しいもんだ(よ)。 日本語の授業を受けるのは楽しい(です)(よ)。


2

I'd go for 彼女はゆくあてもなく真夜中の列車に乗った。 What gets lost is that the English can be interpreted two ways: (1) she gets on some train and goes anywhere and (2) she gets on a train, which goes anywhere.


2

It might be easier to understand the usage if you think of ため as "for the sake of (smb/smth)". 会社{かいしゃ}のために働{はたら}く Work in interests of the company [=for the sake of the company] 彼女{かのじょ}は娘{むすめ}のためなら何でもやる She will do anything for her daughter. [=for the sake of her daughter] 正義{せいぎ}のために In the cause of justice [=for the sake of justice] ...


2

I never did figure out what the right answer was in traditional grammar, but I ended up reading in a linguistics paper somewhere that this is a complementizer. In other words, it turns a clause into a complement of the following verb. In your example, it turns どこにある into an interrogative complement of the verb 知っています:  1. デパートはどこにあるか?  As ...


2

I'm looking to test some Morphological Analysis tools, which split sentences into tokens and provide part of speech and pronunciation information. One of the beauties of Japanese is that there is no need for "pronunciation information". No diphthongs, "silent e", etc. Knowing the 振り仮名 is enough. Anyway, not sure of your purpose, but how about this old ...


2

Counters for days also use Japanese numerals, from 2 to 10: ふつか, みっか, よっか... . 20th also uses a native counter: はつか. Some day numbers use mixed counters (14, 24): じゅうよっか, にじゅうよっか.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible