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8

A. 電話{でんわ}番号{ばんごう}は何番{なんばん}ですか。(What is your phone number?) B. 今年{ことし}は何年{なんねん}ですか。(What year is this?) C. 好{す}きな色{いろ}は何色{なにいろ}ですか。(What is your favorite color?) D. この車{くるま}はあなたの車{くるま}ですか。(Is this your car?) All of these four sentences include a kind of duplication, but nobody feels that they are redundant. Perhaps you think that A, B, C ...


8

They are not grammatical phrases. We just read the symbols verbatim like: [⁠1]{いち} [+]{たす} [⁠2]{に} [=]{は} [⁠3]{さん} It has nothing different than saying: [⁠1]{いち} [+]{プラス} [⁠2]{に} [=]{イコール} [⁠3]{さん} which is also commonly heard. Though we have both [+]{たす/プラス} and [−]{ひく/マイナス}, [×]{かける} and [÷]{わる} only ...


5

I think both of your sentences are occasionally used but the most common way of saying it is "電話番号を教えてください".


3

あなたの電話番号は何番ですか? is a common way of asking someone’s telephone number. We don’t have distinction of singular and plural form as you know. So its direct translation would be “What (number) is your telephone number? We don’t think it’s redundant. I think 貴方の電話, 何番ですか?is passable. But “貴方の電話番号は何ですか?” sounds weird and odd to me. You can also say ...


2

The 番 in 番号 is a part of the noun. The 番 in [何番]{なん・ばん} is a counter suffix ([助数詞]{じょ・すう・し}). Although these two 番s are same in kanji and pronunciation, their roles and nuances in a sentence are different. It's common for native Japanese speakers to use counter suffixes, even if it sounds repetitive in a sentence. For example, when someone goes to a bank ...



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