Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Recently, @naruto mentioned the phrase 頭が赤い魚を食べた猫, which can be understood in many ways. There is some ambiguity in how each word relates to each other. Among other possibilities, it could mean [(頭が赤い)魚]を食べた猫 (red-headed fish) [(頭が赤い)+(魚を食べた)]猫 (red-headed cat) The same applies here. Consider the following pattern: AとBとCのD As far as logic and ...


3

Question 1 可能です。ただし挙げてくださった例文は、実際はあまり使われないでしょう。なぜなら [明日早く起きたら] [食べられる朝ごはんはアイスクリームです。] [子供がうるさいので] [たまらない父はイヤホンをつけた。] という構造に解釈する方が自然なので、そう誤解される可能性が高いからです。 以下のように、被修飾語が最後に来る文であれば一般的です。 こちらがポイントを貯めるともらえる景品です。 「ポイントを貯めるともらえる」が「景品」を修飾しています。 Question 2 これも可能です。ただし説明にある そして「途中で何か良い物を拾ったら半分はヘルメスの神に捧げるから」は「無事に旅をさせてくれといったものです」を修飾しているのですか? ...


3

Roughly saying, you're right. Compared with 日本では…, the sentence with 日本は… lacks solid image of a grammatical case, and are likely to appear along with another sentence in which 日本 doesn't function as a locative case. e.g. 旅行するならどこだろうか? 日本だろうか? 日本は美味しい和食が食べられる・・・ You say 日本で美味しい和食が食べられる” から 変わった文, but whether what you say is right or not depends on what ...


2

(1)“[日本]{にほん}では[美味]{おい}しい[和食]{わしょく}が[食]{た}べられる” (2)“日本は美味しい和食が食べられる” The difference, the way I see it, is that while (1) is a complete sentence by any standard, (2) would only be considered a complete sentence by the standard of informal and/or colloquial speech. 「日本ではおいしい和食が食べられる。」, without adding anything, is simply a good and natural-sounding ...


2

There's no subordinate clause here. That's coordinate clauses: だけどかつのはいつも金太郎だ・です and おおきな体のくまさんでも金太郎にはかてません。で in 金太郎で is the continuative form of the auxiliary だ. The topic in だけどかつのはいつも金太郎だ is かつの, "the one who wins", and the subject in おおきな体のくまさんでも金太郎にはかてません is おおきな体のくまさん. でも, "even", has replaced the subject marker が.


2

だけど勝{か}つのは何時{いつ}も金太郎で大{おお}きな体{からだ}の熊{くま}さんでも金太郎には勝{か}てません So let's start from the beginning: だけど introduces a contrast with the previous sentence similar to but or although. 勝つのは nominalizes 勝つ and introduces it as the subject using particle は, thus the one who wins is 何時も adverb meaning always 金太郎で: This is the part stating that it's Kintarô who ...


1

Japanese 瞬間 always refers to a very short period of time, typically less than a second. (It can refer to a longer period of time, for example if you're talking about the history of the earth, though.) 目を閉じる瞬間 the very moment someone closes their eyes 目を閉じている時 when someone's eyes are closed So you cannot use 瞬間 in the following sentence: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible