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6

This is a relative clause. You might translate it as "The time has come, where (I) die in the greenhouse" or "The time to [die in the greenhouse] has come". It's split up the following way: 温室で死ぬ - die in the greenhouse 時が来た - time has come Literally "Die-in-the-greenhouse time has come". English has signal words that introduce a relative clause, ...


5

A lot has changed, IMO one good way is to compare newspapers from the days. This one is from the Meiji era: http://www.geocities.jp/tanaka_kunitaka/takeshima/saninshimbun/02.gif This one from during WW2: http://userdisk.webry.biglobe.ne.jp/005/523/32/N000/000/000/123528635262516412541.jpg This is from 1960: ...


2

I think the accepted answer by dainichi to this question answers it pretty well: It depends not only on the verb, but on the form of the verb. The general rule is that static verbs and adjectives take "ga" and "action verbs" take "o" on the direct object. piano-o hiku play the piano piano-ga hikeru can play the piano ...


1

Passing judgement about your own Japanese skills while talking with a Japanese native speaker is a little strange. I'd recommend: "日本語{にほんご}ができるようになっている気{き}がしています。" (1) "気{き}がしています" adds the meaning that your opinion about your Japanese skills is yours alone. (2) The present continuous tense "~~になっている" adds the meaning that you think that you are on the ...



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