Hot answers tagged

31

While sawa's answer does cover the basic construction rules, it's definitely worth it to go over the different use cases of わけ. Grab a comfy chair and your favorite beverage, because this is a long one. The best and most complete analysis I've found of this use of わけ is in this 2001 paper by Atsuko Yokota: 文末【ぶんまつ】表現【ひょうげん】「わけだ」の用法【ようほう】 : ...


21

Chris です。 さん is never used (except jokingly perhaps) to refer to oneself. The same goes for other common endings such as くん, ちゃん, さま, 先輩 and 先生. That's because these endings usually convey a kind of relation: for instance, さま conveys respect, くん and ちゃん convey some endearment and while さん conveys very little meaning, it does convey separation. You ...


17

お仕事は? Oshigoto wa? is basically short for お仕事は何ですか? Oshigoto wa nan desu ka? あなたは仕事ですか? Anata wa shigoto desu ka? means "Are you work?" and is nonsensical†. は wa (not わ BTW) is the topic marker.* Just asking 〜は basically means "About ~..." and only hints at the actual question. Leaving things unspoken is a very typical thing in Japanese. "About (your) ...


17

Japanese has many particles (助詞), and they behave in many varying and different ways, so it's helpful to categorize them before we can see how they can be combined. The semi-traditional classification you'd find in Japanese dictionary usually goes along these lines (note that many particles can fall into more than one of these categories as they have ...


14

There are a few simple ways to express this. 「~~と(or に)+ [似]{に}ている」 = "similar to ~~" 「~~の + よう + です/だ/である」 = "like ~~" 「~~みたい + です/だ/である」 = "just like ~~" To use a slightly bigger word, one could say: 「~~と + [同様]{どうよう} + です/だ/である」 = "(very) similar to ~~" For the negative forms of the phrases above, make the following changes: 似ている ⇒ ...


12

Certainly vocabulary helps, but you can get quite far by considering the structure of a sentence. Nouns are usually written in kanji (or katakana) and are practically always followed by a particle (を, が, は, から, etc.) (unless they are followed by a copula で, だ, です, etc.) The stem of verbs (including adjectival verbs, or "i-adjectives") is usually written in ...


11

As ssb and fefe wrote, the sentence consists of two clauses which share the main verb あります. In this particular case, it would be easier to read if the author put a 読点 (“、”) in the sentence: 白い箱はカウチの上に、緑のランプは机の上にあります。 However, unlike commas in English, 読点 in Japanese is rarely (if ever) grammatically required. Authors are free to use 読点 wherever they ...


11

These are sometimes called embedded questions, but if you look them up you'll find a variety of terminology in use, including "embedded interrogative content clauses" and "indirect questions". I think the か in embedded questions is more or less the same か used to form regular questions. But there are a couple differences: In an embedded question, it's ...


10

This 〜た is the perfect, not past; that is, it's indicating a time before some reference time, rather than a time before speech time: 傘を持っていったほうがいい。 Lit. "Having brought an umbrella would be better." That said, I don't think native speakers actually have such a complicated model (of comparing possible future worlds, one of which where you have brought ...


9

Anastrophe exists in Japanese: Usual order: 前の彼女が放火、殺人、信号無視の罪で終身刑になったと知って安心した。 Anastrophe: 前の彼女が終身刑になったと知って安心した。放火、殺人、信号無視の罪で。 (Note about the word 終身刑: Strictly speaking, 終身刑 means life imprisonment without parole, and the usual life imprisonment with a possibility of parole is technically called 無期刑. However, in nontechnical context, 終身刑 often ...


9

There are many instances where one particle immediately follows another. Examples: アメリカでは何語が話されていますか。 車には一人分の空きがあった。 ごめん、僕にも責任があるんだ。 どんな子供でもそのくらい答えられる。* 雹が降るのを見たことがありますか。 彼は走るのが速くないわけではない。 Although it is very difficult to exhaustively explain all of the possibilities, one thing in particular stands out to me as a rule: Because the ...


9

Although it's sometimes hard to tell whether these are single particles put together or a different syntactic element made of two kana, I think it can happen: は will very easily follow a に or a で. For example: 日本には美しい都市が多い。 僕には彼女の言うことが分かった。 英日の翻訳と日英の翻訳では、英日の翻訳を希望する人のほうが多いようです。 (and many cases where it might be hard to decide whether では is really two ...


9

I think your translation is incorrect. I believe this would be something closer to "The mask-using Link" or "Link, using a mask...". The verb precedes the noun because it is describing it. I'm not sure what that's called, but it happens a lot.


9

As with almost anything, there are people who care and others who don't! But it is definitely a thing to consider if you are trying to write well. Degrees of severity There are two angles to this. One is “trivial“, in that the consideration is mostly about legibility, flow, and aesthetics. The other is more consequential, where the “false compound” could ...


9

They are not grammatical phrases. We just read the symbols verbatim like: [⁠1]{いち} [+]{たす} [⁠2]{に} [=]{は} [⁠3]{さん} It has nothing different than saying: [⁠1]{いち} [+]{プラス} [⁠2]{に} [=]{イコール} [⁠3]{さん} which is also commonly heard. Though we have both [+]{たす/プラス} and [−]{ひく/マイナス}, [×]{かける} and [÷]{わる} only ...


8

I'd like to supplement Boaz's excellent answer with some concrete examples, for those members who learn better by example. Using this categorization system, you can say that linking particles may generally follow grammatical role particle when they indicate a role in a sentence... 僕に難しすぎるよ。It is too difficult for me. 僕には難しすぎるよ。[Others may find ...


8

At the risk of going slightly off-topic, I'm going to agree 100% with Kentaro and say that putting the demonstrative determiner (learned a new term today!) in the middle sounds more literary. But there are cases where you can (and indeed must) use this "literary" form in everyday Japanese to avoid ambiguity. Take the following examples: 絵を描いたあの子供 ...


8

You are asking what や in 大きすぎやしないか is. I think that it is a colloquial deformation of は, as is explained in this entry in Daijirin. According to this explanation, it was originally 大きすぎはしないか, in which particle は was used to emphasize the part 大きすぎ. When attached to certain verbs, it is often further contracted as in わかりやしない → わかりゃしない, 聞きやしない → 聞きゃしない. ...


8

I see two big problems with your sentence: In your sentence, 受けている doesn't relate in a natural way to what follows. 楽{たの}しい is an adjective, but you're conjugating it as though it's the non-existent verb 楽{たの}す. (Actually, because the kanji are the same, it looks like a form of 楽{らく}する, but I don't think that's what you intended.) I think you could ...


8

It's not a mistake, it's just a stylistic choice. They do it all the time: 長野)松本山雅がホーム初勝利 岐阜に1―0 愛媛)愛媛FC、松本山雅に競り負け 4戦白星なし 岐阜)船来山古墳群、国史跡へ調査本腰 近畿外で最大級 長野)SKF、バレエ二山さんと共演へ 9月 青森)原発の電源喪失防げ 東北電が送電線工事公開 茨城)原電がウェブで資料公開 東海第二の安全審査巡り 長野)上高地で開山祭 観光シーズン本番に I only spent about 30 seconds looking through headlines to find these examples—I'm not ...


8

To match the tone of "woe" and the slightly older sounding English of the original, why not? 沼地に近寄る者に災いあれ Your それらのための災いは誰が沼に行きます Is, I'm sorry to say, mostly nonsensical: "disasters for the benefit of those, who goes to the swamp?"


8

That depends on context. (After/Once) I wake up, I feed my cat. 起きたら、猫にえさをやる。 (The order/sequence is) after I wake up, I feed my cat. or (Only) after I wake up, I feed my cat. 起きてから、猫にえさをやる。 (After) I wake up, (then) I feed my cat. 起きた後(で)、猫にえさをやる。 PS △ 起きると、猫にえさをやる。 is unnatural, especially for talking about your own actions. ...


8

As Yuu wrote, there is a tendency that よく immediately before a verb often means “well” and that よく at the beginning of a sentence often means “often,” but it is by no means a firm rule. Word order is one of the clues, but in the end, the distinction depends on the context. For example, suppose that someone said よく先生の講義を聞いていれば、試験でいい点がもらえる。 Does it ...


8

A. 電話{でんわ}番号{ばんごう}は何番{なんばん}ですか。(What is your phone number?) B. 今年{ことし}は何年{なんねん}ですか。(What year is this?) C. 好{す}きな色{いろ}は何色{なにいろ}ですか。(What is your favorite color?) D. この車{くるま}はあなたの車{くるま}ですか。(Is this your car?) All of these four sentences include a kind of duplication, but nobody feels that they are redundant. Perhaps you think that A, B, C ...


7

Separating words in a sentence, at least when done by computer, is called segmentation (分かち書き) or tokenization (トークン化). When using an IME to input Japanese, when you hit the space bar to convert the kana to kanji, the IME has to segment whatever it is that you typed, then use a dictionary to replace the kana with it's kanji. As you've probably learned by ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible