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10

"What is 学校" is not an easy question; there are many definitions of it. but here's the summary: Legally speaking, "the narrow definition" of 学校 (aka 一条校), as defined in the first clause of the law called 学校教育法, includes public and private 小学校, 中学校, 高校, 大学, and so on. And it also does include kindergartens (!) but does not include so-called 大学校. Broader ...


7

チケット: Tickets for theaters, amusement parks, sport games, etc. 切符: Tickets in general used for trains, buses, etc. 乗車券: An official term used by railway companies for a type of 切符. 乗車券 refers to a basic fare ticket whose price is calculated based on the travel distance. You may additionally need other types of 切符 such as 特急券 ("limited express train ticket"). ...


6

I think the difference between 肩に乗せる and 肩にかける is trivial, and does not help understand the difference between 担ぐ and 担う. What's more important is the following sentence: (「担う」は)下から支える意味合いが強く、通常は「次代をになう」「責任をになう」のように、物事を支えるという抽象的な意味で用いられることが多い。 担【かつ】ぐ and 担【にな】う both means to carry, but the latter is almost always used metaphorically today (役割を担う, ~...


6

There is a difference and it is not so small. 「[苗字]{みょうじ}」 is the word we use to refer to one's family name (as opposed to one's given name) in our everyday life. In saying things like "What's your family name?", "I only know his family name: I forgot his given name.", "She has the same family name as I do.", everyone will use 「苗字」. No one would use 「[家名]{...


6

This is a really interesting question! Here is just my way of looking at it. “無理な X” does not really specify which aspects of X are 無理 (= extremely difficult, near impossible, or unreasonable). This is a little different from 負け戦 — which by the way can also be used a priori — because it's specified that the impossibility is in the winning/losing part. So ...


6

Regarding the difference between 歌 and 曲: An (entire) work of vocal music, A track (with vocal): Both 曲 or 歌 are used interchangeably, but the former is more common. ビートルズの[曲/歌]が2つ入ったCD A work of music without vocal (e.g. a piece of classical music): 曲 シューベルトの曲を演奏する Music (as opposed to lyrics/vocal), Melody: 曲 Song (as opposed to melody/lyrics), ...


5

When I see 歓喜の声を上げる, I have something "explosive" in mind, like this: On the other hand, when I see 喜悦の声を上げる in non-religious contexts, what I would have in mind is the voice of sensual pleasure, induced by things like drugs or orgasm. According to BCCWJ, 喜悦 is rarer and much more literary than 歓喜. 歓喜 frequently appears in light novels and casual blog ...


4

「[手招]{てまね}く」, as the 手 part would suggest, means "to signal a person using one's hand to tell that person to come near". The word, therefore, has a very limited meaning. 「[招]{まね}く」 just means "to invite" in general. To 「招く」 a person to a party, you may use the phone, email, snail mail, etc. You probably do not 「手招く」 someone to a "party" unless you are ...


3

多難{たなん} literally means "lots of difficulties". There are a few different ways of producing a potential "antonym", depending on what kind of meaning you're looking for. 多幸{たこう} literally means "lots of happinesses / good fortune", and this is often seen as the closest to an antonym. Other possibilities include 無難{ぶなん} "no difficulty", as noted by l'...


3

「[足利時代]{あしかがじだい}」 is just another name for 「[室町]{むろまち}時代」; There is no difference in what the two terms refer to. The former name exists because it was the 足利 family who were in control during that period (1336 - 1573). The latter is the usual name we learn in school in Japan. It is like calling 「[江戸]{えど}時代」 as 「[徳川]{とくがわ}時代」; The former is more common. ...


3

No, because it's not an action that you or the listener does. If anything, the action is done by mankind and you don't need to respect mankind ;) Similarly for e.g. 関西でよく食べられる明石焼をご存知ですか?. Here, the verb know is changed to show respect, but not the verb eat. If the action is performed by a group you need to show respect, that's a different story. E.g. ...


2

Using まめ is correct in the context of getting a blister on your sole. 水疱 and 水ぶくれ have same meaning, but the former one is academic term. 火ぶくれ is only used for it caused by burns.


2

無理 isn't so much 'unprofitable' or 'failed' or 'lost' as it is 'pointless' or 'not worth trying'. 無理だった is a statement that an attempt could never have succeeded in the first place, not merely that it failed. To my ears, there's a clear difference between 負け戦 and 無理な戦. A 負け戦 is simply lost, and that's that; there's nothing else implied about the war. A 無理な戦 ...


2

In addition to naruto's answer, I think there's an element of aspect: if I understand the terms correctly, katsugu is telic or momentary, describing the action of actually putting something on one's shoulders, whereas ninau has more atelic or ongoing connotations of something being on one's shoulders. This may be part of why the usage diverged over time.


1

学校 means a building or place in which people are educated. There are many kinds of 学校. 学校 which is set by Basic Act on Education are 幼稚園、小学校、中学校、義務教育学校、高等学校、中等教育学校、特別支援学校、大学(短期大学および大学院を含む),高等専門学校. Their name is set by its purpose and the studying number of years. It is said that they have formal kind. 大学 and 大学校 are different. 大学 means university and ...


1

This is a good question, since I have never paid due attention to before, and when I googled it some Japanese too have same question with you. The questioner went to ( probably a shrine ) on New Years Day and there he or she bought written oracles ( probably 2 ) and one of the oracles says 歓喜あり The other says 喜悦あるべし The answerer is responding ...


1

I'd translate 同然 as "so similar that it can now be considered X" or "as if it is X". It states there is effectively no difference between the two. E.g. 夫婦も同然の二人、もはや勝ったも同然だ. 同様 would be more generally, "in the same manner to X", e.g. 炭酸と同様の作用を有する、操作は先ほどと同様です 同性婚は認められていないものの、夫婦と同様の税制が適用される ... same tax rules are applied . 同性婚は認められていないものの、...


1

旨{むね} only partially substitutes for こと. It means "effect" in "I'll contact them to that effect." For telling the topic of matter, you can use 件{けん} instead. ご契約の旨連絡させていただきます。 I'll let them know to the effect that you (enter into the) contract. ご契約の件連絡させていただきます。 I'll let them know concerning your contract. Both of them are only used in formal/...



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