Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

It's short for の家{うち}. You will normally see the abbreviation んち: (1a) 俺の家に来い。 (1b) 俺んちに来い。 (2a) お前の家に行きたいなぁ。 (2b) お前んちに行きたいなぁ。 But in cases where there is already an ん before the abbreviation (like おばあちゃん ends in ん in this case) we just see ち: (3a) タモリさんの家に行きたい。 (3b) タモリさんちに行きたい。 (4a) 明日麻美ちゃんの家に行く。 (4b) 明日麻美ちゃんちに行く。 So your ...


7

「め」 is a suffix of contempt when attached to a noun or another person's name. 「この[犬]{いぬ}め!」= "You stupid dog!" 「[許]{ゆる}せん、[田中]{たなか}め!」= "Will never forgive Tanaka the bastard!" Translation is an art. You could use whatever word you feel appropriate for the context that expresses contempt, scorn, disdain, etc. Note that it is a suffix of humility when ...


6

X在住 is the closest answer for your question. This can be used like 私は東京在住です。 and 東京在住の日本人. Also X居住 is acceptable. The difference between them is where the subject is living, which here means X. X in X在住 are like country, province, city or village. X in X居住 are like house, apartment.


6

The かん here is 間 in kanji, and this is used as a suffix to refer to a span of time. ろくしゅう in your sentence is spelled 六週 in kanji and means "six weeks", but in a way that is more ambiguous than the English. Various suffixes can be added on the end to make things more specific, like 目{め} to mean "the sixth week", or 分{ぶん} to indicate six weeks' worth of ...


6

There are various agent suffixes or just plain nouns that get used in Japanese, as opposed to the one straightforward -er suffix in English. You've mentioned a few, but all with the on'yomi -- the kun'yomi get used too for at least the following: 手 shu in on'yomi compounds, te in kun'yomi compounds 選手 senshu -- "chosen hand" → player chosen to be on a ...


6

It comes from the Classical honorific verb 「[賜]{たま}ふ」, which means "to give (from one in a higher position to one in the lower)". The Modern counterpart is 「お[与]{あた}えになる」 or 「[下]{くだ}さる」. The 「ふ」 has become 「う」 over time as you probably know. This verb can be used as an honorific subsidiary verb following another verb. The Modern counterparts are ...


5

It's contracted with the particle は: オレたち+は → オレたちゃ


5

お忘れなく means 忘れずに or 忘れないで, don't forget. It's the negative form of an honorific form of 忘れる. Here is the definition of お/ご~ある/ない in the dictionary: ある 動詞の連用形や動作性の漢語名詞などに付いて、多く「お…ある」「御(ご)…ある」の形で、その動作をする人に対する尊敬を表す。「おいで―・れ」「御笑覧―・れ」 More examples: お忘れなく -> 忘れないで お構いなく -> 構わないで ご遠慮なく -> 遠慮しないで ご心配なく -> 心配しないで お咎めなく -> 咎めないで お見逃しなく -> ...


5

The Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Japanese (BCCWJ, http://www.kotonoha.gr.jp/shonagon) draws on published sources such as literature, newspapers, etc., as recent as 2005. The numbers for the words in question are 移民者{いみんしゃ} iminsha 8 results 移住者{いじゅうしゃ} ijūsha 181 results 労働者{ろうどうしゃ} rōdōsha 6982 results 定住者{ていじゅうしゃ} teijūsha 19 results ...


4

I must be missing something obvious, but the article doesn't make sense to me As far as I know, an immigrant as an individual person is ijūsha. The Toronto Japanese Community Association refers to itself as 新移住者協会, for instance (http://torontonjca.com/). The term imin, to my understanding, generally refers to migration or immigration itself, rather than the ...


4

I don't think this is a very good question but rather than ignore it, I will try to explain why in an answer. First let's confirm what you are asking: Grammatically "i-adjectives" and "na-adjectives" can combine with そう to form new na-adjectives which decribe how a situation seems (as opposed to actually is). Examples include: おいしい ー> おいしそう(な)|delicious ...


4

「お寿司屋{すしや}さん」 is composed of 「お」,「寿司{すし}」,「屋{や}」 and 「さん」. Here, 「屋{や}」 is affixed to the name of some merchandise (「寿司{すし}」「魚{さかな}」「石{いし}」 etc.) or service (「クリーニング」「修理{しゅうり}」 etc.) to mean: A shop selling the merchandise or providing the service or all those shops as a whole The owner of a shop selling the merchandise or providing the service When ...


3

Generally there are three choices for the kind of quantifiers addressed here. Although the OP's question uses numeral quantifiers, the same would be true for others, such as すべて, etc. Attributive position That is the case where the quantifier, marked by の, precedes the noun, e.g. the OP's third example. Composition Composition is when the quantifier ...


3

It comes from the verb 給【たま】う via ウ音便. Other examples: 問【と】う → 問うた, しまう → しもうた, 言【い】う → 言【ゆ】うた. This is a feature of medieval Japanese and persists in western dialects of modern Japanese; in standard Japanese it is only found in fossilised forms.


3

I think one needs to distinguish two uses of ~そう. The one appears after a stem form, and is a derivational suffix of the na-adjectival class (NA). The other one appears after a fully inflected expression, and is thus particle (P). Here are two examples: a. その店、おいしそうだ。(NA) That shop looks tasty. (i.e. the food they sell there) b. その店、おいしいそうだ。(P) ...


3

They are exactly same. Appending さん after a store is common. The latter is a more polite form. However, the latter is not used in formal writing.


3

Sama (様【さま】) is a markedly more respectful version of san. It is used mainly to refer to people much higher in rank than oneself, toward one's guests or customers (such as a sports venue announcer addressing members of the audience), and sometimes toward people one greatly admires and can be used for either gender. See the Wikipedia article Japanese ...


3

Firstly, I searched Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ, http://www.kotonoha.gr.jp/shonagon) and all results were either そうさ (as in そうだよ) ごち そうさ ま そうさ せる and its conjugations. Here is why I think ~そう+さ as you suggested cannot exist. It would consist of two parts, where ~さ is describing a quality, an objective fact about ...


1

ーさん can be used as a courtesy title to address or refer to others with certain occupations. eg: 運転手さん 肉屋さん 看護師さん The addition of the お prefix to your example is an example of お being used for politeness, as opposed to respecting the position of the listener. Reference: "Japanese for all occasions" by Taeko Kamiya, p13 & 17 In my experience, when used ...


1

Yes, ditto what How to Japanese said, context is king. お兄さんに食べられる [something] is eaten by elder brother お兄さんが食べられる elder brother is eaten [by something] OR elder brother can eat [something] And, as Jeemusu notes, -られる is often turned into -れる in speech and more casual writing, precisely to help clarify this difference. About tense, @How to Japanese, ...


1

For ratios, 割{わり} is also used in other contexts to mean something like "10%", extending from the meaning of "split". So 十割そば are noodles that are 10 x 10% buckwheat, i.e. 100% buckwheat. 七割そば would be 70% buckwheat (the rest usually made up of wheat). For beverages, other kinds of 割 include: コーラ割り, like rum and coca cola 牛乳割り, like milk and brandy ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible