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9

I think your translation is incorrect. I believe this would be something closer to "The mask-using Link" or "Link, using a mask...". The verb precedes the noun because it is describing it. I'm not sure what that's called, but it happens a lot.


9

As @Flaw flawlessly explains, Japanese sentences can have clausal predicates. This is what causes what is commonly known as double-subject constructions, although I believe "clausal predicates" really illustrates the structure better. I assume you have heard constructions like 彼は髪が長い He has long hair Some teachers/textbooks might explain this away by ...


9

I think this is how: Consider first Clause1: 家賃が安い. The structure is Subject1+が+Predicate1. Subject1: 家賃 Predicate1: 安い Now consider Clause2: (都心より)郊外のほうが家賃が安い. The structure is Subject2+が+Predicate2, where Predicate2 is Clause1. Subject2: 郊外のほう Predicate2: 家賃が安い Predicate: The part of a sentence or clause saying something about the subject


8

What is a subject? There's more than one theory of grammar, whether we're talking about English or Japanese, and you may find that the term subject has been defined multiple ways. But some definitions are more adequate than others. How can we define subject in a useful way? Let's start by looking at English, then move on to Japanese, and see we can ...


7

Just like adjectives, verbs in Japanese can be used to describe nouns. In this situation, the 連体形 of the verb is used, which happen to be the same as 終止形 (the form used to end sentence) in modern Japanese. In this formation, a sentence is not formed. It only gets a descriptive phrase, which can be used as part of the sentence (as a noun phrase). So the ...


6

Are there any obvious tricks I'm missing that help me keep track of who is speaking and who they are speaking about? Thanks. ・Pronouns This one's pretty obvious. What pronouns do each character tend to refer to themselves with? What pronouns do they tend to use to refer to certain other characters? ・Gender indicators Besides pronouns, there may be ...


5

This is actually an interesting little story. Old Japanese, as far as we can tell, didn't have a dedicated subject marker - if you wanted a subject that wasn't the topic also, you just left it unmarked. It had two genitive particles, though, *nə and *ŋga (modern の and が); which varied according to a kind of animacy hierarchy - *ŋga with personal pronouns ...


5

It's probably not "late to erase the distortion of the unstoppable chest" :-) It's 止まらない, not 止まれない. I think it's the 歪 which is 止まらない. In other words, 止まらない modifies the phrase 胸の歪. 〜ておくれよ is probably 〜てくれよ with the honorific お- added to くれる. Here we have an imperative form of 〜てくれる, so it seems the speaker is asking the listener to do something for ...


5

That sentence means "I want you to choose clothes which resonate with this pink scarf." After the te-form of a verb, ほしい means "I want (you) to do something" according to Edict.


4

In this specific "(電車を)降ります" case, I know the phrase like this is actually frequently used in a crowded train, and it means "I get off!". If the subject is "I", explicitly adding a subject ("私は降ります!") in such a case is very unnatural in Japanese. If the subject is not "me" but someone else, I know that people would usually say "降りる人がいます!" (lit. "There is a ...


4

I think your confusion may be arising from thinking that が is a prepositional particle. It is not preposed(placed before a word) to the verb. It is a post-positional subject marker, it is postposed(placed after a word) after the subject. By extension, there is no requirement for が to immediately precede the verb. The element of Xが may be freely moved around ...


3

There are many instances where の and が could both technically be used, but where one is more natural-sounding (or seems more relevant to the intent of the sentence) than the other. I'd think I'd say that this is probably one of those situations, though I'd never say it the second way, personally; I'd always use の. The clause 「彼女がどんな困難からも逃げない」 is most ...


2

There's no subordinate clause here. That's coordinate clauses: だけどかつのはいつも金太郎だ・です and おおきな体のくまさんでも金太郎にはかてません。で in 金太郎で is the continuative form of the auxiliary だ. The topic in だけどかつのはいつも金太郎だ is かつの, "the one who wins", and the subject in おおきな体のくまさんでも金太郎にはかてません is おおきな体のくまさん. でも, "even", has replaced the subject marker が.


2

だけど勝{か}つのは何時{いつ}も金太郎で大{おお}きな体{からだ}の熊{くま}さんでも金太郎には勝{か}てません So let's start from the beginning: だけど introduces a contrast with the previous sentence similar to but or although. 勝つのは nominalizes 勝つ and introduces it as the subject using particle は, thus the one who wins is 何時も adverb meaning always 金太郎で: This is the part stating that it's Kintarô who ...


2

を is an object marker, of course! The subject of this sentence is someone who killed the goblin, which is omitted and not shown in this excerpt. Assuming the omitted subject as "I"... 始末したコボルトを盾にするように群へと突っ込み、二匹のコボルトを巻き込んで地面に倒れ込む。 I rushed into the crowd (as if I were) using the goblins I killed as a shield, and collapsed on the ground dragging two ...


1

笑顔で、いや、寝付けなくてという僕の袖を、彼女が引いた。 I'm sure this sentence actually should have been 笑顔で、「いや、寝付けなくて」 と言う僕の袖を、彼女が引いた。 So it is the man that is having trouble sleeping. And for smiling, it is highly likely the woman that is smiling, because considering the 「」 and a comma after 笑顔で (、) in the sentence above, the clauses will be 笑顔で、(「いや、寝付けなくて」 ...


1

Like in English, Japanese nouns can be modified by phrases. The sentence you gave could be broken into: A cat is talking. ねこはしゃべっている。 I don't understand the cat. わたしはねこがわからない。 Combined, they yield: The cat I don't understand is talking. わたしがわからないねこは しゃべっている。 As you can see, one can simply prefix the noun with a descriptive phrase. It simply ...



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