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12

It has to do with the stroke order of the part underneath it. For this example, I'll refer to 左 as ナ and エ, and 右 as ナ and ロ. For 左、 since the first stroke of the underneath part (the エ) is horizontal, the ナ is started with the horizontal stroke. For 右, since the first stroke of the ロ is vertical, the ナ is also started vertically. Similarly for 有 and 布. ...


8

Left side of those two words are different originally There is some meaning that shorter stroke mean 手のひら "Palm", longer one is 腕 "arm". Normally, shorter stroke which mean "手のひら" write first most of the time, so according to original kanji, 右 "Right" need to write a vertical slant stroke first and 左 "Left" need to write horizonal stroke first.


6

Stroke order is important for hand-written Japanese, which includes normal handwriting and various styles of calligraphy. The stroke order gives a flow to the character that can be recognized, even when the character looks very different to its [楷書]{かいしょ} incarnation. For the non-expert, a character written in 楷書 (in the correct order) probably cannot be ...


6

I feel that at the extremes of stroke order perfection foreigners always seem to be better than native Japanese, maybe because there are just too many who make it a pastime to know all stroke orders for all sorts of obscure 漢字. Unless you are dealing with a 書道 teacher (or school teacher), the general focus is more on whether you are able to remember all ...


5

If you compare these two links: http://www.vividict.com/WordInfo.aspx?id=2831 for 牛 and http://www.vividict.com/WordInfo.aspx?id=2512 for 生 you can see how these characters have evolved over time. Basically, 牛 starts as the image of the face of a water cow with its horns. so the down stroke came last. Conversely, the life image emerged from 屮 and 土 at ...


5

The font you're looking for is 教科書体【きょうかしょたい】. It is based on how people handwrite kanji. Textbooks for elementary school students are printed with this font family. After graduating from elementary schools, 明朝体 is primarily used. The following article explains why 教科書体 is better than 明朝 or ゴシック family, for learners. ...


5

When you want to ask a Japanese person about a kanji/word... they may ask you to write it out. If you trace out the character with a finger on your palm IN THE CORRECT ORDER, they will probably be able to recognize the strokes and answer your question quickly. This shows up way more often than you'd expect. Frankly, it's easier to remember complex kanji if ...


5

Well, a han-dakuten isn't a kanji, so I would say that it doesn't matter one way or another. However, the actual kanji 〇 has a "stroke order" (stroke direction?) of a single stroke starting at the top and going counter-clockwise. (Link) So, if 。 does have one, my bet is that's what it is.


5

Although the modern characters are very similar, they show a remarkable difference when written in seal script. Since the short stroke representing the hand is drawn first, and the hands are on the corresponding sides of the character, the stroke drawn from the character's meaning to the opposite (e.g. from left to right on 左) is drawn first. (Yes, I ...


4

I think that in elementary school stroke type (at least はねる) is definitely regarded an important part of learning kanji. For instance, the kanji 竹 is a first-year character and the hook on the last stroke is an important part. I think that most elementary schools would take marks off (i.e. not ◯ but △) for omitting the hook in a test. (The hook is even ...


3

To quote Toritoribe from JapaneseReference (JRef.com) forums: も was made from the 草書体[そうしょたい] of the kanji 毛[モウ, け]. So, the stroke order of も was also from the the stroke order of 毛. Incidentally, the stroke order is different in 楷書体[かいしょたい]. (The link of the wiktionary page doesn't work due to garbled characters. Please search 毛 on Wiktionary. ...


3

Yes, it is not that big a deal to get some ordering wrong. Most of the time, unless someone is watcing you write, they won't even be able to tell how you wrote it! The reason the stroke order is emphasized in Japanese schools is that as you start writing kanjis faster and faster, strokes start to join together. You can see the most beautiful example of this ...


1

Not a native, however here are a couple of observations on my part between my learning experience and the semester of 書道 I studied when I was in Japan. 大丈夫 has always been a favorite example of mine to use for this topic, because I can't think of any other word in Japanese that composed of more similar, yet different, characters. The first two (大丈), in ...


1

Most of the Japanese text that is produced is produced by printing (books, newspapers, magazines, office printing, electronic displays, ...) and in printing there is no stroke order, or no evidence of stroke order in the end-result.



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