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Maybe there are the same . it depends were you used yappari so desu and naruhodo .. Its my opinion


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It comes from: つく[つく·付く], which primarily means to stick onto, to attach to, although it has several other meanings. In the situation you mentioned, it can be used as an English equivalent of "Follow (them/him/her/it)!" as the act of following is in fact, 'sticking on' to someone who is running or walking away. Just on a side note, Korean shares a lot of ...


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This repeated そう are kind of aizuchi 相槌. It might be regarded as a backchannel also. (I'm not a linguistic expert.) As you may know, native Japanese often use the combinations of verbal and non-verbal backchannels like そうそう/うんうん and nodding during the conversation. This small study shows some numbers.


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"そう、そう、そう" implies strong agreement and affirmation with the remark of the other. To me, it's very different from simple and curt "そう." She is saying "It's really delicious" and demanding affirmation of the other on her statement and judgement. We usually and casually say "そう、そう" in agreement, but don't repeat "そう" so many times. But she repeated it four ...



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