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「カッコイイのやってみたいと[思]{おも}ってます。」= 「カッコイイの + を + やってみたいと思ってます。」 「の」 is a nominalizer that turns the adjective 「カッコイイ」 into a noun-like form - "a カッコイイ one". What the thing is should be clear to you from the context. We have no way of knowing it here. "I'm hoping to pull off a good one." (I just used the adjective "good" because I do not know what ...


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In my experience, sounding similar to the sources that you study from (e.g. textbook, anime, women etc.) is almost like a rite of passage as you learn the language. But as you learn more and more you'll begin to learn the differences in intonation/word choice that fits your particular character, whether it be female or male. For me, this relates similar to ...


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Similar to you, I've studied Japanese with various resources, but the majority of the people I've learned conversation from have been women. On occasion I've been told by someone close to me that I have said things that sound feminine, either in word usage or intonation. I've tried to be careful about that and lately I haven't heard too many complaints in ...


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やっぱり has several meanings, such as: やっぱり、思った通りだ。 -- It is so, just as I thought/expected/suspected. -> That's exactly what I thought. / I knew it. やっぱり、こっちにします。 -- On the second thought, / I changed my mind, I'll pick this one. それでも / なんだかんだ言っても、やっぱり嬉しいです。 -- But I'm happy, nonetheless / all the same / after all. Here in your ...


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やっぱり is frequently used when someone is uncertain about what to do or how to feel about something. For example: イギリスに行こうかな。。。いや、やっぱり日本に行く! Maybe I should go to England. No, actually I'll go to Japan! Regarding your dialog, without the full context and knowing what they are talking about, it is hard to say for certain, but here I get the feeling ...



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