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8

We call our pets by their (nick)names most of the time. [ The pet's name (+ chan to show extra affection)]、 こっちおいで。([...], kocchi oide.) You can replace the name with generic terms like 猫ちゃん(neko-chan; kitty) and ワンちゃん(wan-chan; doggy) if you don't know what they are called. 行くよ(iku yo) means "let's go", by the way.


7

感じ(だ) is more colloquial than 感じがする, but I would say they're also slightly different. 感じだ doesn't necessarily have something to do with feelings, e.g. そんな感じ(だ) (It's) something like that Likewise 恋した時ってどんな感じなんですか could be asking about other circumstances than feelings, although feelings would be an obvious topic when talking about love: "What's it ...


7

In my experience, the nature of the relationship and the nature of the communication are both important for knowing when/how to use the plain form and to knowing what the use of plain form signals. In written workplace communication, I never see plain form (I work at a university). In written personal communications (things like Facebook or IM), I rarely ...


6

I'm by no means anything more than a beginner, but I've both used (and had the skit script I wrote it in scrutinized for grammar and spelling) and heard 「まあいいじゃん」 used to say "it doesn't matter", "whatever then, it's okay if you're not clear on it", which are just slightly different words for "never mind", "don't worry about it", so yes, it is.


6

I believe ブームメント is simply a typo. Some people seem to have mixed ブーム (boom) with ムーブメント (movement) and came up with ブームメント. Watch this video, where one idol accidentally said ブームメント, and was corrected by others at once. https://youtu.be/Hl8V6vtdYIc?t=35s


5

I would say 落札ってどういう意味?(casual) 落札ってどういう意味ですか?(polite) 落札とは、どういう意味でしょうか。(politer, formal)


4

In my personal experience, the transition from polite to plain form is done spontaneously, specifically if you are of the same age level or same position (at work). A month or two after your introduction, you may switch to plain form if there are no inhibitions from your part of any kind, or you have done a milestone together (project closure, etc) . ...


4

どこまでドジっ娘{こ}なのよ、あの子{こ} あはは…ま、まあ、わざとじゃないんだし こういうのって天然{てんねん}が一番怖{いちばんこわ}いのよ 「こういうの」 here refers to the "ドジ-ness" of people in general. 「ドジ」 is a colloquial word meaning "clumsiness", "goof-ups", etc. The speaker is saying that among the different kinds of goofiness people display, the 「天然{てんねん}」= "natural, innate, etc." kind scares her the ...


4

I've heard it a few times myself and the subtitles do tend to either spell out the English letters or break up the syllables. While the characters of many languages (including Romance, Germanic, and Semitic languages) have names, the same is not true of Japanese, Chinese, or other Asiatic languages. Characters will sometimes break up their speech in anime ...


4

No. As 読んで and 呼んで have different accents in both standard Japanese and Kansai dialect. 呼ぶ and 呼び出す are... 呼ぶ: call someone. 呼び出す: call someone and ask him to come somewhere. They are similar, sometimes same.


4

なじむ is rarely used for a person, so まだアリサさんになじまない is unnatural. I think 知る、親しくなる、仲良くなる are better like ~さんをよく知らない、~さんと親しくなっていない、~さんと仲良くなっていない.


4

突然 is more common, because its meaning is broader than that of どっと. 突然 is just "suddenly." どっと does have meaning of suddenness, but usage of どっと is limited to those 3 situation, according to Digital Daijirin. Lots of people letting out their voice at the same time. Lots of people / things coming at one time. Becoming (seriously) ill in a short ...


4

I think ブームメント can be either a simple malapromism, or an intended neology combining "boom" and "ment" of "movement." It may mean a sensational boom, but I'm not sure. The word, ブームメント isn't a standard Japanese word anyway.


4

「カッコイイのやってみたいと[思]{おも}ってます。」= 「カッコイイの + を + やってみたいと思ってます。」 「の」 is a nominalizer that turns the adjective 「カッコイイ」 into a noun-like form - "a カッコイイ one". What the thing is should be clear to you from the context. We have no way of knowing it here. "I'm hoping to pull off a good one." (I just used the adjective "good" because I do not know what ...


3

Your usage of ~のような is correct as long as grammar is concerned. "Children are like cherry blossoms" is a simile which is not widely recognized, and it's somewhat puzzling to me. Whether this is natural or not would depend on how successfully you can explain your intention in the following sentences. This もの should be written in hiragana, because it's a ...


3

「すごいすごい。[初]{はじ}めてです、[広島]{ひろ・しま}は。」 is not wrong, but if you are a man, it's a little strange, because 「すごいすごい」 is a phrase that a girl says, usually (if it has a positive nuance). If you want to emphasize すごい, すっごい would be more natural to use than すごいすごい. すっごい is commonly used by both men and women. 「すっごい初めてです!」 is naturally said in casual ...


3

「それ」 here does not refer to an actual utterance made. Instead, it would refer to 流星's logic, reasoning or way of thinking that has been expressed by the line 「…わ、分かった。嫁達{よめたち}の健康{けんこう}と笑顔{えがお}には代えられん。」= "Alright. Nothing could replace our wives' good health and smiles.". 「それでいい」 often means 「その考{かんが}え方{かた}でいい」 or 「そのやり方でいい」 and this one is no exception. ...


3

「やりい」 is a light or friendly imperative form of the Standard 「やれ(よ)/やりなさい(よ)/やりな(よ)」 used in parts of Western Japan. 「早{はや}く言{い}いなさい」⇒「はよ言い」 「食{た}べなさい」⇒「食べえ」 「よく見{み}なさい」⇒「よう見い」


3

普段、気が荒い流星が、「難しいな」という(気弱な、あるいは、女の子を気づかう)発言をするとは思わなかった という意味だと思います。 「そういうところ」 は、「なぜだ?」という発言から感じられる、気が荒い、あるいは、女の子の気持ちなど気にしない性格 をさしていると思います。 Girl2's 「そういうところが」 means she feels blunt part of Ryusei from 「なぜだ?」 and she cannot image Ryusei says 「難しいな・・」(= そんな言葉)


3

It looks like you already understand the feeling of 駄目だこいつ or 駄目人間 used in this kind of comical situation. Then it's the same thing that is referred to here. Simply put, she just said 駄目 twice for emphasis. You can think こいつら or 人間 is omitted in the first sentence. 「駄目だこいつら…ここは駄目人間の巣窟だわ」 or 「駄目人間だ…ここは駄目人間の巣窟だわ」 both makes sense, but these sentences sound a ...


3

そういうこと = 彩葉さんが、誘いを断って帰っていったという結果・状況。


3

どゆこと is a shortening of どういうこと. 言う is often pronounced ゆう and the ゆ appears in all sorts of inflections of いう, like ゆえない for いえない or ゆって for いって etc. TV subtitles often use spellings that are supposed to reflect words as they might be spoken, like どゆこと or やってます for やっています or やだ for いやだ. In the case of どゆこと it conveys maybe a little extra surprise, because ...


3

「俺とお前の腕に大した差はないよ」というのは、つまり「俺とおまえの腕には、差がある。」ということだからです。「大した差は、ない。」は、「少しは、差がある。」「俺のほうが腕が上だ。/ 俺のほうが強い。」ということを前提として(当たり前のこととして)言っていることになるので、こう言われると、普通、ムカつくと思います。 Because 「俺とお前の腕に大した差はないよ」 means/implies there is difference. This is like "(I'm stronger/better than you, but) the difference in our skills is not so big (that I have to do 手加減)."


3

She's teasing him. 一丁前に照れちゃって is something like "So you are no longer a kid, you know how to be shy!" (like an adolescent boy, in a situation like this where a woman touches a man) もー at the end is もう, which is not a conjunction but an interjection like "gee", "whew". From a dictionary: 5 ...


3

Though I'm ignorant of the preceding setting, Yuhana declined the other character’s suggestion for Yuhana to join the production work of snow statues by adding an unnecessary and problematic reasoning – the teachers are letting their pupils engage in heavy work of removing accumulated snow from the schoolhouse because it’s troublesome for teachers to do it. ...


3

I feel this depends on the context and her character. (most likely) 湯花 was talking to her close friend, and she wanted to confess her feelings anyway, knowing it was not suitable. (全くだ ≒ Yeah, I know) (Can I say she's being ironical?) (less likely) 湯花 changed her mind after the other person pointed out it was not suitable. (全くだ ≒ Fine, you're right.) ...


3

It's the girl who is showing her 包容力 (to her boyfriend). 彼氏くんの方が攻め攻め implies the boyfriend was aggressive and taking initiative, and the girl was acting rather passively. But in reality, the girl was not that passive, but was intentionally letting him do as he likes (with her "broad-mindedness" ≒ 包容力).


2

You are mostly on the right track. Those would not, however, be called "indirect quotes" if the words were not uttered in the first place. "Interpretation" is a good word for it as the 「~~」 part of 「~~というのなら」 is only what the speaker "assumes" to be true ; He did not "hear" it. 「というのなら」 is close to "if that is the case", "if that is what it means" in ...


2

I think there's a lot of variation between speakers. Even as a foreigner at a university, I have met various types of speakers: never use teineigo at all, even though I'm clearly older people who use keigo for a few minutes and switch when I reply in casual form (most common) people who use keigo for weeks, and say it's uncomfortable to use casual form ...


2

It is definition 5-㋑. 「[上手]{うま}いモンでしょう」 is, in my own words, an "exclamatory rhetorical question". = "Looks awesome, doesn't it?" The "statement" form using this 「もん」 would be 「上手いもんだ/もんです」. So, 「モン」 does not refer to the scribble itself.



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