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8

We call our pets by their (nick)names most of the time. [ The pet's name (+ chan to show extra affection)]、 こっちおいで。([...], kocchi oide.) You can replace the name with generic terms like 猫ちゃん(neko-chan; kitty) and ワンちゃん(wan-chan; doggy) if you don't know what they are called. 行くよ(iku yo) means "let's go", by the way.


6

I believe ブームメント is simply a typo. Some people seem to have mixed ブーム (boom) with ムーブメント (movement) and came up with ブームメント. Watch this video, where one idol accidentally said ブームメント, and was corrected by others at once. https://youtu.be/Hl8V6vtdYIc?t=35s


5

I would say 落札ってどういう意味?(casual) 落札ってどういう意味ですか?(polite) 落札とは、どういう意味でしょうか。(politer, formal)


5

It is difficult to give a precise answer to this question. In cases where the speaker has a choice between "da" and just ending the sentence, both have their own nuances. Omission may be more "feminine" and addition of da might be more "masculine". In some cases, da can be used for emphasis. Usage patterns vary by gender, age, social situation, and ...


4

なじむ is rarely used for a person, so まだアリサさんになじまない is unnatural. I think 知る、親しくなる、仲良くなる are better like ~さんをよく知らない、~さんと親しくなっていない、~さんと仲良くなっていない.


4

No. As 読んで and 呼んで have different accents in both standard Japanese and Kansai dialect. 呼ぶ and 呼び出す are... 呼ぶ: call someone. 呼び出す: call someone and ask him to come somewhere. They are similar, sometimes same.


4

突然 is more common, because its meaning is broader than that of どっと. 突然 is just "suddenly." どっと does have meaning of suddenness, but usage of どっと is limited to those 3 situation, according to Digital Daijirin. Lots of people letting out their voice at the same time. Lots of people / things coming at one time. Becoming (seriously) ill in a short ...


4

I think ブームメント can be either a simple malapromism, or an intended neology combining "boom" and "ment" of "movement." It may mean a sensational boom, but I'm not sure. The word, ブームメント isn't a standard Japanese word anyway.


4

It means something like He's always like that あの子 (or この子 if the child is nearby) is a standard way of referring to your own child in conversation. (だし)さ is displaying a mild concern (he's always playing with his food, he's always getting his clothes dirty, etc.) し is actually the listing particle ~し~し, but often used by itself for emphasis in ...


3

It's the girl who is showing her 包容力 (to her boyfriend). 彼氏くんの方が攻め攻め implies the boyfriend was aggressive and taking initiative, and the girl was acting rather passively. But in reality, the girl was not that passive, but was intentionally letting him do as he likes (with her "broad-mindedness" ≒ 包容力).


3

Your usage of ~のような is correct as long as grammar is concerned. "Children are like cherry blossoms" is a simile which is not widely recognized, and it's somewhat puzzling to me. Whether this is natural or not would depend on how successfully you can explain your intention in the following sentences. This もの should be written in hiragana, because it's a 形式名詞. ...


3

「すごいすごい。[初]{はじ}めてです、[広島]{ひろ・しま}は。」 is not wrong, but if you are a man, it's a little strange, because 「すごいすごい」 is a phrase that a girl says, usually (if it has a positive nuance). If you want to emphasize すごい, すっごい would be more natural to use than すごいすごい. すっごい is commonly used by both men and women. 「すっごい初めてです!」 is naturally said in casual ...


3

I feel this depends on the context and her character. (most likely) 湯花 was talking to her close friend, and she wanted to confess her feelings anyway, knowing it was not suitable. (全くだ ≒ Yeah, I know) (Can I say she's being ironical?) (less likely) 湯花 changed her mind after the other person pointed out it was not suitable. (全くだ ≒ Fine, you're right.) (...


3

Though I'm ignorant of the preceding setting, Yuhana declined the other character’s suggestion for Yuhana to join the production work of snow statues by adding an unnecessary and problematic reasoning – the teachers are letting their pupils engage in heavy work of removing accumulated snow from the schoolhouse because it’s troublesome for teachers to do it. ...


3

She's teasing him. 一丁前に照れちゃって is something like "So you are no longer a kid, you know how to be shy!" (like an adolescent boy, in a situation like this where a woman touches a man) もー at the end is もう, which is not a conjunction but an interjection like "gee", "whew". From a dictionary: 5 自分の判断・感情などを強める気持ちを表す語。感動詞的にも用いる。まさに。なんとも。「これは―疑う余地のない事実だ」「...


2

Without any context, (あなたより)私の方が好き can mean either of: I love someone more than you love him/her. Someone loves me more than he/she loves you. But it doesn't mean "I love you more than I love someone." nor "I love someone more than I love you." In this context, this sentence means "I love people (=mankind in general) more than you love people." If one ...


2

When いや is used in the sense of being a casual way to say 'no', yes, it is mostly only used by men. And as Hideki says, 嫌だ meaning disgust or dislike is the other meaning. The reason I'm submitting a separate answer that says the same as his is because of potential difference in dialect. I've been living in Tokyo for several years and I hear women(usually ...


2

There are two kinds of いや. One is the one you mentioned. It basically means 'no'. The other is a short form of 嫌{いや}だ. This word expresses a feeling of disgust / dislike. Actually young female speakers use the short form a lot. Male speakers say いやだ and seldom use the short form.


2

I think 冬に助けられたし in this sentence means "This(His) room didn't smell because the winter morning air cleaned up the air of his room", that is to say, "he was helped by winter".


2

Regarding your quote,「ったく、銀貨5枚とどちらが割に合うんだかな」, "ったく" doesn't make sense in Japanese. Is it "全く"? Something is missing. "どちらが割に合うんだかな" means "Which would be worth more?" or "Which is more advantageous (profitable)?" A more common way of saying this is "どちらが割に合うのかな" or "どちらが割に合うの(ん)だか." I think "な" at the tail is used for the purpose of emphasis or self-...


2

To use your words. I think it is something like "I wonder what is/would be more worth it, those 5 silver coins that boy offered, or this 'free' meal I will receive. Clearly dissatisfied with the the reward he will receive, which is presumably, worth less and the request will be more troublesome if he has to look after this other person as well.


2

やっぱり has several meanings, such as: やっぱり、思った通りだ。 -- It is so, just as I thought/expected/suspected. -> That's exactly what I thought. / I knew it. やっぱり、こっちにします。 -- On the second thought, / I changed my mind, I'll pick this one. それでも / なんだかんだ言っても、やっぱり嬉しいです。 -- But I'm happy, nonetheless / all the same / after all. Here in your ...


2

Similar to you, I've studied Japanese with various resources, but the majority of the people I've learned conversation from have been women. On occasion I've been told by someone close to me that I have said things that sound feminine, either in word usage or intonation. I've tried to be careful about that and lately I haven't heard too many complaints in ...


1

In my experience, sounding similar to the sources that you study from (e.g. textbook, anime, women etc.) is almost like a rite of passage as you learn the language. But as you learn more and more you'll begin to learn the differences in intonation/word choice that fits your particular character, whether it be female or male. For me, this relates similar to ...


1

そういうこと in the first dialog corresponds to the second meaning: 「前述の発言内容を全面的に肯定する」. This そういうこと refers to the "lesson" which 音ちゃん just realized (自慢しちゃダメ). This kind of そういうこと can be translated as "Now you understand it", "Yeah, that's what I mean", etc. (Strictly speaking, in this case, 音ちゃん had not explicitly said something like 自慢しちゃダメだった when he said ...


1

The sentence means "I can't tell you only once or twice. I want to tell you more.".


1

Yes this can be found in everyday speech. It can sometimes be expressed by using a pause or saying "なかぽつ" but this is generally used for quoting or reading off something exactly the way it is written. I would say it is much more common for a speaker to include とか or など to the same effect in colloquial speech. Saying なかぽつ can sound a bit tongue in cheek by ...



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