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9

Because Chinese doesn't have voiced consonants. In Chinese, voiced /b/d/g/ are just variants of their voiceless counterparts. So you can't hear the difference between voiced sounds and voiceless sounds. It's hard to explain and learn by text. Instead, I recommend you practice it by listening and imitating. The site 首都大学東京 mic-J 日本語教育 AV リソース may be ...


7

Use 「3つのグラフ」 or 「3枚【まい】のグラフ」. Whichever is OK, but maybe the latter will sound just a little bit more formal.


4

There are actually three sentences worth discussing (1) あなたはやさしい人です (2) あなたはやさしい人だ (3) あなたはやさしい人 For each sentence, we should consider three dimensions: grammaticality, softness, and politeness. (1) is soft (doesn't sound too direct), polite (shows respect for addressee). (2) is rough (sounds like a point's trying to be made), not polite ...


4

すげえまずい <= すごいまずい <= すごくまずい i.e. gross/really awful tasting. As for the change すごい => すげえ, you might be aware of, for example, いらない => いらねえ, both of which are very informal. P.S. Since you provide no context, I assumed that まずい refers to food. まずい is used in other contexts, so you may have to adjust the translation accordingly.


4

Use the latter if you want to speak and write "natural" Japanese. 「~~はどういう意味ですか。」 is how native speakers ask for a word's definition. 「~~の意味はなんですか。」, while grammatical, sounds SO "directly translated" from "What is the meaning of ~~?". It is not very natural, if not incorrect.


4

Yes, right. くそ・クソ・糞 is used in place here for what usually would be すごく, e.g. くそかわ = すごく可愛い くそうめぇ = すごくうまい (=すごくおいしい) etc. (As slang is usually more versatile, there are more expressions with クソ, where すごく isn't a valid substition, e.g. 糞美人. Also, note that くそ isn't traditionally a positive interjection/prefix/..., but traditionally used to ...


4

The difference is audible as Japanese pronunciation has a rhythm based on morae: Every simple kana あ, ぬ, や, etc., is one mora long. (This includes ん!) The contractions りゃ, ぴょ, etc. are one mora long. The long vowel mark (長音符) ー (e.g. in アート) is one mora long. The small つ (っ) counts one mora. So こんにちは is five morae long and should be pronounced that way, ...


3

I believe Darius hit all the points on how it differs in spoken Japanese. I'd like to add that tone and context also play a huge role when it comes to spoken Japanese, or any other spoken language for that matter. Generally speaking, です at the end of sentence has a high likelihood of signifying politeness, but it also depends on context and tone (which I ...


3

If I ignore semantics and discuss syntax only, I think that it went like this: もの was originally 物, a lexical noun (実質名詞), which could be modified by a relative clause ending in 用言の連体形. It was then grammaticalized into a formal noun (形式名詞), losing its literal meaning but still appearing in the same syntactic position, after a relative clause ending in ...


1

I hate to say, but at this point in your study, what's gonna help the most is just learning vocabulary, and lots and lots of repetition. So you know that おんなのこ is a word. But is おなのこ a word? At this point (to you), it very well could be, so look it up in a dictionary (some online dictionaries are listed here if you don't have one). If it's not a real ...


1

It sounds like much of what you are facing is a cultural more than syntactic problem. A コンビニ is not a bodega; there's no chummy socialization that happens there. All of the language I use in the convenience store is transactional: If you need to ask them to check out: お[会計]{かいけい}お[願]{ねが}いします。 / To indicate the method of payment: ~~で[払]{はら}います。 ...



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