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23

What Lyle said is true―you'll want to practice a lot. It's much easier to recognize words and phrases you're used to hearing, not just used to reading. That means ear training, and there's no way around it! Still, we can look at some facts about Japanese pronunciation. I'm a non-native speaker, and one of the trickiest things for a non-native speaker to ...


6

snailboat has already provided an excellent response, but I'd like to share an online resource that's pretty useful when trying to figure out the pitch accents of any given text. Just stick your Japanese text into Prosody Tutor Suzuki-kun, tweak the settings as you see fit, hit "analyze", and you'll see a rather accurate pitch analysis of the input text. ...


4

けど is the short form of けれども, which could be written け(れ)ど(も), because all of けれども, けれど, けども, けど are used. けども is what, in my experience, is often used in a half formal, half informal setting. It is more refined than けど, but not quite as stiff as けれども.


4

You probably heard ってば, which is a contraction of と言えば. From 大辞林: てば (「と言えば」の転。[...] 「ん」で終わる語に付く場合以外は、すべて「ってば」の形をとる) 一 [...] 二 (終助) 文末にあって種々の語に付く。じれったい気持ちをこめて、呼びかけるのに用いる。「お母さん、はやくっ—」「はやく来ないと、行列が過ぎちゃうっ—」 The keywords here are じれったい (impatient) and 呼びかける (call out to so.). The nuance of trying to "convince the listener of something" only ...


3

けれども is a contradictory conjugation expressing something along the lines of "but" or "however." The ど/ども part in this expression is the part that expresses the contradiction. By a means of shortening one's speech (through laziness, etc.) the different forms came into usage. The shortening is analogous to contractions in English (cannot -> can't). As such, ...



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