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6

感じ(だ) is more colloquial than 感じがする, but I would say they're also slightly different. 感じだ doesn't necessarily have something to do with feelings, e.g. そんな感じ(だ) (It's) something like that Likewise 恋した時ってどんな感じなんですか could be asking about other circumstances than feelings, although feelings would be an obvious topic when talking about love: "What's it ...


3

どゆこと is a shortening of どういうこと. 言う is often pronounced ゆう and the ゆ appears in all sorts of inflections of いう, like ゆえない for いえない or ゆって for いって etc. TV subtitles often use spellings that are supposed to reflect words as they might be spoken, like どゆこと or やってます for やっています or やだ for いやだ. In the case of どゆこと it conveys maybe a little extra surprise, because ...


3

In my experience, the nature of the relationship and the nature of the communication are both important for knowing when/how to use the plain form and to knowing what the use of plain form signals. In written workplace communication, I never see plain form (I work at a university). In written personal communications (things like Facebook or IM), I rarely ...


3

I've heard it a few times myself and the subtitles do tend to either spell out the English letters or break up the syllables. While the characters of many languages (including Romance, Germanic, and Semitic languages) have names, the same is not true of Japanese, Chinese, or other Asiatic languages. Characters will sometimes break up their speech in anime ...


3

そういうこと = 彩葉さんが、誘いを断って帰っていったという結果・状況。


2

Japanese is not as tonal of a language as English with its rhythmic iambic pentameter (English is said to be "a stress-timed language") or Chinese (Japanese does have some tones, such as kami [paper] vs. kami [god] vs. kami [hair] or hashi [bridge] and hashi [chopsticks]). In English, emphasis is often accomplished by changing the tonal stress of the ...


2

In my personal experience, the transition from polite to plain form is done spontaneously, specifically if you are of the same age level or same position (at work). A month or two after your introduction, you may switch to plain form if there are no inhibitions from your part of any kind, or you have done a milestone together (project closure, etc) . ...


2

You are mostly on the right track. Those would not, however, be called "indirect quotes" if the words were not uttered in the first place. "Interpretation" is a good word for it as the 「~~」 part of 「~~というのなら」 is only what the speaker "assumes" to be true ; He did not "hear" it. 「というのなら」 is close to "if that is the case", "if that is what it means" in ...


2

It is definition 5-㋑. 「[上手]{うま}いモンでしょう」 is, in my own words, an "exclamatory rhetorical question". = "Looks awesome, doesn't it?" The "statement" form using this 「もん」 would be 「上手いもんだ/もんです」. So, 「モン」 does not refer to the scribble itself.


1

I think there's a lot of variation between speakers. Even as a foreigner at a university, I have met various types of speakers: never use teineigo at all, even though I'm clearly older people who use keigo for a few minutes and switch when I reply in casual form (most common) people who use keigo for weeks, and say it's uncomfortable to use casual form ...


1

I would say 私に厳しくしてください (but do you really want someone to be strict with you?)


1

Whenever it feels right. This is probably not the answer you were looking for, so here are my observations: If it's anything work related, or official, you stick to the polite language, no matter how well you know the person you are talking to. As soon as you are doing something else in your private life, let's say having a beer together, it's okay to use ...



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