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23

Atashi is for females. Chicchai can be seen as more emphatic "tiny". They are both quite common. Remember that in most textbooks for any language the most ideal form of the language (often judged so by prescriptive grammarians) is taught. As you familiarize yourself with real world usage (through travel, friends, and media) you will discover all sorts of ...


22

YOU and Mark have already mentioned that 全然 can be used with a small set of positive descriptions, and that this is usage is not considered correct (which might be true, but it's absurdly common, so that doesn't really matter). But my impression is that the positive version of 全然 is not really limited to a small set of words, but rather to particular ...


14

もしもし is used to call for someone’s attention. Although it is often used on the phone, the use is not limited to phone calls. もしもし is a repetition of もし, which is also used to call for an attention. もし is a variation of 申し (もうし), which was used in the same way in old time. 申し definitely predates telephones, and I guess that both もし and もしもし for asking for ...


13

Like YOU mentioned, Zenzen being used with positive words is slang and not correct Japanese. That being said, Japanese people use it all the time, especially young people. Typically I hear 全然 with OK、大丈夫、平気, 楽しい、and きれい with others possibly I haven't heard. That is to say that the words that are used with 全然 in a positive sense are probably limited to just ...


12

It might have been おっす instead. According to gogen, it's おはようございます that has undergone shortening to form おっす.


11

You may be familiar with the concept of sentence-level pitch changes in English; for example when you are asking a question, you end the sentence with a rising pitch to indicate that it is indeed a question. Japanese also has sentence-level pitch changes, but more relevantly to this question, it has word-level pitch changes. Downstep Notation In the ...


11

Actually, you've already got the right answer! The verb in question is する, and one of its negative stems (未然形) is せ〜, as in せず, せぬ, and as you've just discovered, せん. The other negative stem of する is the well-known し〜. Note that these are not interchangeable: **せない is ungrammatical, as is **しず. The only verbs that have this extra negative stem are する and ...


10

No, it's not really used in everyday speech. "Everyday writing" is a little ambiguous because it's mostly the form of the writing that determines the tone. To address your edit, it would be weird to use まい in a message to your friend, but I wouldn't be surprised to see it in work correspondence if only because that tends to be more formal in general. The ...


9

I saw some people using it here but it is not common. One case I saw many times was a girl lecturing her friend and said 高校生じゃあるまいし kind of this.


9

In this example, やっぱり functions as something like "as I thought" and shows that the speaker had a preexisting suspicion that a certain matter was indeed true. なるほど shows that a greater understanding of the surrounding context has been gained from the confirmation of the fact referred to by そう. So yes, it does make sense. EDIT (for the updated question) I ...


9

You are parsing the sentence incorrectly. It should be 長年やってるけど かかった ためし (は) ない なぁ It then roughly means, I have been doing this for quite some years, but it's not like I have ever caught anything. ためし (written 試し) can mean "trial/test", but here it is used in the sense of "experience" (written 例 or 様; see Tsuyoshi Ito's comment below and the ...


9

Other samples from this character in your manga would be helpful to confirm this, but my guess is that せん is equivalent to しない (and possibly derived from せぬ, see Zhen Lin's comment below). Then, 苦労せん means something like "don't worry" or "don't fret". This is really part of the group of dialects from 'Western Japan'. In particular, [九州弁]{きゅうしゅうべん} uses せんで ...


9

Because Chinese doesn't have voiced consonants. In Chinese, voiced /b/d/g/ are just variants of their voiceless counterparts. So you can't hear the difference between voiced sounds and voiceless sounds. It's hard to explain and learn by text. Instead, I recommend you practice it by listening and imitating. The site 首都大学東京 mic-J 日本語教育 AV リソース may be ...


8

I agree with Chocolate: it is not expected, regardless of whether the traveler is a native speaker of Japanese or not. And as a result of doing something unexpected, some people may interpret it as making fun of the local accent, because it seems to be the most plausible explanation why anyone from another area would imitate (probably very poorly) the local ...


8

I live in Kansai area and speak Kansai-ben, and would not try to speak in Tohoku accent if I ever stayed in Tohoku for weeks/months, nor would I expect anyone from Tokyo to speak in Kansai accent when he/she is staying in Kansai for weeks/months.


8

As you probably already read in the question on dialects, Yakuzas are often pictured speaking Hiroshima-ben on TV. According to Japanese friends, this has probably as much to do with the fact that Hiroshima-ben naturally sounds quite hard to the ear (whereas soft-spoken Kyoto-ben is the typical dialect choice for cute, feminine characters) as any real-world ...


8

As you say, ねー is a (very) informal, rather masculine, way of replacing ない at the end of words. Works for both verbs: 行かない → 行かねー and い-adjectives (which are kind-of-verbs anyway, but let's not get into that debate here): 危ない【あぶない】→ アブねー in fact it also works with other "-a" kanas. E.g: ヤバい → ヤベー Adding のだ/んだ as you do in your example is only ...


8

Another possibility is that the /g/ is being lenited into a voiced velar fricative /ɣ/, as is common between vowels in Japanese. (See "Handbook of the International Phonetic Association: Japanese" by Hideo Okada, or Wikipedia.) Further, since the second /g/ has rounded vowels (/o/) on both sides, it is likely to be somewhat rounded (/ɣʷ/ = /w̝/). The ...


7

The usual placeholder in Japanese is 「なになに」, although type-specific placeholders such as 「だれだれ」 and 「なんとかなんとか」 may be used.


7

In some parts of Tohoku, the greeting "おやすみなさい" or "また明日" is said "おみょうにづ", with is a deformation from "おみょうにち". Even though it refers to the next day, I think that "お" is the same one as in "お早う". I can't remember whether "あした" is casually said "みょうにづ" though…


7

I have heard it used in formal (e.g. business) contexts. I have never heard it used in casual conversations among friends or family. This is what you might expect, because Sino-Japanese words like みょうにち do tend to have a more formal feel than native Japanese words like あした or あす, when they exist alongside each other with similar meanings.


7

I feel that speaking a foreign language in an accent other than the 'standard' one is kind of like playing the violin: it sounds really awful from a beginner, but from someone skilled it can sound very nice. I myself lived for two years in the Kanto area and learned to speak 'standard' Japanese. After that I spent a year in Kyoto and though I learned to ...


7

Use 「3つのグラフ」 or 「3枚【まい】のグラフ」. Whichever is OK, but maybe the latter will sound just a little bit more formal.


6

Yes, they're common, but those words in particular are very casual and あたし is only used by girls. Many women will not use it since it's so effeminate, but it's not uncommon.


6

あたし (atashi) is the female version of 私 for referring to yourself. わたし (watashi) is the neutral form for that, so you can use it always. あたし is only used by females, while 僕 (ぼく, boku) one of multiple possibilities for males is (although 僕 by itself is rather informal). There are many words that are dependent on who it says, or who it is addressed. あたし is ...


6

もしもし is from 申し(もうし) being double and shortened, and at Edo-era people use only もうし without repetition. 申す(もうす) is same meaning with 言う(いう)/話す(はなす), but we use as polite-from nowaday. ref: http://gogen-allguide.com/mo/moshimoshi.html


5

Omission of syntax to allow the user to infer meaning (for politeness or whatever reason) is one of the many characteristics of Japanese. What remains unsaid is often stronger than what is actually said. The Japanese abhor "spelling things out" for you, because it is not "harmonious" and puts them in a position of having to be direct. If you've read こころ by ...


5

I've often heard "おっす" as a shorter version of "おつかれさまです". That'd be a greeting you'd say after someone had a tough day, a long ride, or almost anything. It can also be used is a very derogative sentence "人生おっす!" (jinsei, oss(u)!" which I reckon is something like "thank you for living until today, you now useless piece of (…)" Notice that in both cases, I ...


5

You also have なんちゃら in the Kansai area.



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